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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Huber, John C."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Wills, Laura Jean. Effects of Parental Notification and Consent Laws on Teenage Births and Abortions in Texas.

Degree: PhD, Health Services Research, 2014, Texas A&M University

Teen pregnancy and teen abortions are major public health concerns in the United States. The more than 300,000 births to teens each year often involve increased risk to the health of the mother and the baby. Teenage pregnancy and births also raise a variety of related political, clinical, social, and economic concerns. To make effective recommendations regarding contraception, teenage pregnancy, abortion, and sexual education programs, researchers must produce empirical evidence, which accurately evaluates policy options for persons involved in public health policy and legislation. This study investigated the effect of parental notification and consent laws on teen births and abortions in Texas. This research examined health data of females aged 13 - 21 from Texas for 1995 through 2009. In January 2000, Texas enacted a law requiring a medical provider to notify the parents of a minor female seeking an abortion, before performing the abortion. In 2005, the law changed, requiring notarized parental consent in addition to notification for an unemancipated minor to receive an abortion. Teenage birth and abortion rates, as well as other health outcomes related to pregnancy were analyzed. The data included years before notification laws (1995 – 1999), the years following enactment of the notification law (2000 – 2004), and the most current data following the more rigid consent law (2005 – 2009). The analysis used a time-series approach, specifically Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model-fitting processes, to identify any changes in the patterns of the dependent variables resulting from this legislation. Overall, parental notification and consent laws did seem to have an effect on birth and abortion rates for minors in Texas. Specifically, notification laws seemed to have the greatest impact on 16 – 17 year old females, reducing birth and abortion rates. Results were mixed in terms of the effect of the more stringent consent laws and the overall impact of both laws on health outcomes. Findings did differ by race/ethnicity category. Advisors/Committee Members: Phillips, Charles (advisor), Hawes, Catherine (committee member), Bolin, Jane (committee member), Huber, John C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: pregnancy; abortion; ARIMA

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wills, L. J. (2014). Effects of Parental Notification and Consent Laws on Teenage Births and Abortions in Texas. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153672

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wills, Laura Jean. “Effects of Parental Notification and Consent Laws on Teenage Births and Abortions in Texas.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153672.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wills, Laura Jean. “Effects of Parental Notification and Consent Laws on Teenage Births and Abortions in Texas.” 2014. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Wills LJ. Effects of Parental Notification and Consent Laws on Teenage Births and Abortions in Texas. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2014. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153672.

Council of Science Editors:

Wills LJ. Effects of Parental Notification and Consent Laws on Teenage Births and Abortions in Texas. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153672

2. Rollo, Susan Noble. Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Sciences, 2012, Texas A&M University

The purpose of this dissertation is threefold: to determine the differences in apparent prevalence and the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. between antimicrobial-free and conventional swine farms; secondly, to introduce an appropriate statistical model to compare the minimum inhibitory concentration distributions of Escherichia coli and Campylobacter spp. isolated from both farm types; and thirdly, to examine the potential herd level risk factors that may be associated with antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter spp. and E. coli isolates from finishers on antimicrobial-free and conventional farming systems. In addition, a critical review of studies that have compared the levels and patterns of antimicrobial resistance among animals from antimicrobial-free and conventional farming practices was performed. Fecal samples from 15 pigs were collected from each of 35 antimicrobial-free and 60 conventional farms in the Midwestern U.S. Campylobacter spp. was isolated from 464 of 1,422 fecal samples, and each isolate was tested for susceptibility to 6 antimicrobials. The apparent prevalence of Campylobacter spp. isolates was approximately 33 percent on both conventional and antimicrobial-free farms. The proportion of antimicrobial resistance among Campylobacter was higher for three antimicrobials within conventional compared to antimicrobial-free farms. The susceptibilities of populations of bacteria to antimicrobial drugs were summarized as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) frequency distributions. The use of MIC values removed the subjectivity associated with the choice of breakpoints which define an isolate as susceptible or resistant. A discrete-time survival analysis model was introduced as the recommended statistical model when MICs are the outcome. A questionnaire was completed by each farm manager on biosecurity, preventive medication, vaccines, disease history, and production management. Multivariable population-averaged statistical models were used to determine the relationships among antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and potential herd-level risk factors. Controlling for herd type (antimicrobial-free versus conventional), each antimicrobial-bacterial species combination yielded unique combinations of risk factors; however, housing type, history of rhinitis, farm ventilation, and history of swine flu were significant in more than one model. A variety of herd-level practices were associated with the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance on swine farms. Further studies are encouraged when considering interventions for antimicrobial resistance on both antimicrobial-free and conventional farms. Advisors/Committee Members: Norby, Bo (advisor), Scott, H M. (committee member), Fajt, Virginia R. (committee member), Huber, John C. (committee member), Libal, Melissa (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: antimicrobial resistance; minimum inhibitory concentration; discrete time survival analysis; antimicrobial-free farms; Escherichia coli; Campylobacter; risk factors; swine

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rollo, S. N. (2012). Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-08-9755

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rollo, Susan Noble. “Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-08-9755.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rollo, Susan Noble. “Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin.” 2012. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Rollo SN. Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2012. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-08-9755.

Council of Science Editors:

Rollo SN. Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-08-9755

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