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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Houghton, Stephanie A"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Cancho Diez, Cesar. Essays on Energy and Regulatory Compliance.

Degree: 2012, Texas A&M University

This dissertation contains two essays on the analysis of market imperfections. In the first essay, I empirically test whether in a three-level hierarchy with asymmetries of information, more competition among intermediaries leads to more deception against the principal. In this setting, intermediaries supervise agents by delegation of the principal, and compete among themselves to provide supervision services to the agents. They cannot be perfectly monitored, therefore allowing them to manipulate supervision results in favor of the agents, and potentially leading to less than optimal outcomes for the principal. Using inspection-level data from the vehicular inspection program in Atlanta, I test for the existence of inspection deception (false positives), and whether this incidence is a function of the number of local competitors by station. I estimate the incidence of the most common form of false positives (clean piping) to be 9% of the passing inspections during the sample period. Moreover, the incidence of clean piping  – passing results of a different vehicle fraudulently applied to a failing vehicle  – per station increases by 0.7% with one more competitor within a 0.5 mile radius. These results are consistent with the presence of more competitors exacerbating the perverse incentives introduced by competition under this setting. In the second essay, we test whether electricity consumption by industrial and commercial customers responds to real-time prices after these firms sign-up for prices linked to the electricity wholesale market price. In principle, time-varying prices (TVP) can mitigate market power in wholesale markets and promote the integration of intermittent generation sources such as wind and solar power. However, little is known about the prevalence of TVP, especially in deregulated retail markets where customers can choose whether to adopt TVP, and how these firms change their consumption after signing up for this type of tariff. We study firm-level data on commercial and industrial customers in Texas, and estimate the magnitude of demand responsiveness using demand equations that consider the restrictions imposed by the microeconomic theory. We find a meaningful level of take-up of TVP ? in some sectors more than one-quarter of customers signed up for TVP. Nevertheless, the estimated price responsiveness of consumption is still small. Estimations by size and by type of industry show that own price elasticities are in most cases below 0.01 in absolute value. In the only cases that own price elasticities reach 0.02 in absolute value, the magnitude of demand response compared to the aggregate demand is negligible. Advisors/Committee Members: Puller, Steven L. (advisor), Wiggins, Steven N. (committee member), Houghton, Stephanie A. (committee member), Taylor, Lori L. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Vehicular Emission Inspections; Local Competition; Fraud; Clean Piping; Electricity; Time-varying prices; ERCOT; Texas.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cancho Diez, C. (2012). Essays on Energy and Regulatory Compliance. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-08-11512

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cancho Diez, Cesar. “Essays on Energy and Regulatory Compliance.” 2012. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed December 09, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-08-11512.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cancho Diez, Cesar. “Essays on Energy and Regulatory Compliance.” 2012. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Cancho Diez C. Essays on Energy and Regulatory Compliance. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-08-11512.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cancho Diez C. Essays on Energy and Regulatory Compliance. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-08-11512

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

2. Han, Sungmin. Three Essays in Applied Microeconomics.

Degree: 2013, Texas A&M University

My dissertation is composed of three sections. The first section examines the effect of monetary incentives on student performance in public education in Texas. I address how to deal with non-random samples caused by self-selection bias by using propensity score matching method. For the second part, using household level panel data, it addresses the substantial heterogeneity across demographic groups. In addition, for the last section, I also investigate firm?s optimal innovation strategy. It addresses the relationship among firm growth, firm size and firm behavior in the U.S. manufacturing industry. The first section investigates the causal relationship between a teacher incentive program (District Awards for Teacher Excellence (D.A.T.E.) Program) and student academic achievement in Texas by using school-grade level panel data. I find that D.A.T.E. schools obtain significantly higher student achievement gains in reading and math than non-D.A.T.E. schools after the implementation of the program. In addition, D.A.T.E. schools implementing selected school plan obtain greater student achievement gains than those implementing district wide plan. However, the causal effects are found mainly among middle school. Importantly, these findings imply that the teacher incentive program could be an effective policy tool in Texas for developing student performance, but should be cautiously implemented due to the difference in effects according to the U.S. school level. The second section shows that while financial benefit and moral hazard appears to be the main cause of bankruptcy for less educated individuals, well-educated individuals file due to negative income shocks. This is consistent with some evidence suggesting that educated individuals face greater stigma and/or worse information regarding bankruptcy than less-educated individuals. Importantly, these results imply that optimal bankruptcy policy should likely vary across different demographic groups. In the third section, I find that firm size is negatively related to firm growth and positively correlated with firm survivability in the manufacturing industry. R&D investment has a significantly positive effect on firm growth and survivability in the same industry. In the services industry, advertising investment causes a reverse effect on firm growth. This suggests that innovative activities should vary depending on the characteristics of each industry. Advisors/Committee Members: Gronberg, Timothy J (advisor), Houghton, Stephanie A (committee member), Gan, Li (committee member), Kim, Hwagyun (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Monetary Incentive; Personal Bankruptcy; Innovation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Han, S. (2013). Three Essays in Applied Microeconomics. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/149338

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Han, Sungmin. “Three Essays in Applied Microeconomics.” 2013. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed December 09, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/149338.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Han, Sungmin. “Three Essays in Applied Microeconomics.” 2013. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Han S. Three Essays in Applied Microeconomics. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/149338.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Han S. Three Essays in Applied Microeconomics. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/149338

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.