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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("H., Welsh Jr., Thomas"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Keen, Heidi A. Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2007, Texas A&M University

Activity of group-transported horses was evaluated during onboard rest stops to determine if horses derive meaningful rest. A single-deck semi-trailer separated into three compartments was used for all shipments. In Experiment One, twelve video cameras were used to record behavior of horses during five, 16 to 20 h shipments, with a high (397.44kg/m2), medium (348.48 kg/m2) and low (220.91 kg/m2) density group in each shipment. One-hour rest stops occurred after 8 h of transport and prior to unloading, during which two groups were provided water. Movement of each horse visible on video was quantified by counting the number of times the head crossed the vertical and/or horizontal axes of the body at the withers. Mean number of movements per 5-min interval in each group (n=13) was used to compare effects of density, access to water, and order of stops. The high and low-density watered groups had increased activity during the first 10 min of both rest stops potentially due to maneuvering for access to water. The medium-density watered groups had increased activity during the first 10 min of only the second rest stop. Activity slightly increased in the medium and low-density groups after 55 min possibly indicating adequate rest, but a similar increase did not occur in highdensity groups. In Experiment Two, two shipments, lasting 23 h and 24 h respectively, consisted of three groups of horses loaded at high density (397.32 kg/m2). Ninety-minute rest stops occurred after every 6 h of transport and prior to unloading for a total of three rest stops. Percentage of visible horses "active" was averaged across each 5-min interval of the stop. Activity was highly variable within and between shipments. Activity was high at the beginning of stops one and three of Shipment One. A similar but less dramatic settling occurred at the start of all three rest stops in Shipment Two. Twenty three of thirty-four noted increases in alertness were due to aggression or noises outside the trailer. In both experiments horses remained active during all stops indicating fatigue had not become a major factor in these studies. Advisors/Committee Members: Friend, Theodore H. (advisor), Varner, Gary E. (committee member), H., Welsh Jr., Thomas (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: horse transport; rest stops

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APA (6th Edition):

Keen, H. A. (2007). Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4708

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keen, Heidi A. “Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4708.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keen, Heidi A. “Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops.” 2007. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Keen HA. Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2007. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4708.

Council of Science Editors:

Keen HA. Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4708


Texas A&M University

2. Oliphint, Ryan Allan. Evaluation of the inter-relationships of temperament, stress responsiveness and immune function in beef calves.

Degree: MS, Physiology of Reproduction, 2006, Texas A&M University

A series of in vivo and in vitro approaches were followed to assess the inter-relationships of temperament, stress responsiveness and immune function in beef bulls and steers. In experiment one, Brahman bull calves were weaned at approximately six months of age when pen score and exit velocity were measured to sort calves into groups with extremes in temperament (calm n = 10 and temperamental n = 10). The calves were vaccinated on day 0 and 42 of the study with serial blood samples colleted for 11 weeks. Calm calves tended to have higher primary and secondary immune responses as indicated by increased serum concentrations of immunoglobulin G following Clostridial vaccination. In vitro lymphocyte cultures were performed on day 0 and 42 to measure proliferation and IgM production. Calm calves had significantly higher proliferative responses on both day 0 and 42. Lymphocyte IgM production was significantly higher in calm calves on day 0 and tended to be higher on day 42 than temperamental calves. In experiment two, weaned and yearling steers were arrayed by pen score and exit velocity, to assign steers to groups with extremes in temperament (trial 1: calm n = 7 and temperamental n = 5; trial 2: calm n = 5 and temperamental n = 5). In both trials, temperamental steers had higher proliferative responses than calm steers. Immunoglobulin M production did not differ in either trial. The effects of stress responsiveness on animal performance and health are considerable because they affect the profitability of the cattle industry. Investigations into animal temperament can help cattle producers identify animals that may be more susceptible to decreased performance and immunosuppression. The effectiveness of vaccines given to calves is important in conferring immunity to common diseases at times when they are at a higher risk for infection. If we can identify temperamental animals that will not perform as well as their cohorts, management procedures can be altered to reduce the risks associated with decreased performance and morbidity. Advisors/Committee Members: Randel, Ron D. (advisor), H., Welsh Jr., Thomas (advisor), Forbes, Thomas D. A. (committee member), Laurenz, Jaime C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: temperament; immune; stress

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Oliphint, R. A. (2006). Evaluation of the inter-relationships of temperament, stress responsiveness and immune function in beef calves. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3981

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Oliphint, Ryan Allan. “Evaluation of the inter-relationships of temperament, stress responsiveness and immune function in beef calves.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3981.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Oliphint, Ryan Allan. “Evaluation of the inter-relationships of temperament, stress responsiveness and immune function in beef calves.” 2006. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Oliphint RA. Evaluation of the inter-relationships of temperament, stress responsiveness and immune function in beef calves. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3981.

Council of Science Editors:

Oliphint RA. Evaluation of the inter-relationships of temperament, stress responsiveness and immune function in beef calves. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3981


Texas A&M University

3. Jacobs Hollenbeck, Regina. Evaluation of adrenal function, growth, carcass characteristics, blood metabolites, hematological and immune parameters in Angus, Brahman, Bonsmara X Angus and Bonsmara beef steers.

Degree: MS, Physiology of Reproduction, 2006, Texas A&M University

Adrenal function, blood metabolites, hematological parameters, growth, and carcass characteristics were compared in tropically-adapted (Brahman,) intermediate (Bonsmara and Bonsmara X Angus crossbred,) and temperate (Angus; n=10 each) beef steers. An adrenal gland challenge was conducted, entailing serial blood collection at 15-min intervals for a 12.5-h period, with administration of exogenous ACTH (0.1 IU/kg BW) 2.5-h into the experiment. Steers were maintained on Coastal bermudagrass pastures overseeded with ryegrass for five month; body weights and blood samples were obtained every 21 days. An anterior pituitary/adrenal gland challenge was conducted, entailing serial blood collection at 120, 90, 60 and 30 min prior to, and 10, 20, 30, 60 and 120 min following administration of exogenous CRH (0.1 ug/kg BW). Physical and physiological signs of heat stress were assessed, and blood samples were obtained for analysis. Exit velocity was measured. Carcass characteristics were determined post-slaughter. Statistical analysis was conducted using ANOVA for repeated measures, using least square means and Pearson’s and Spearman’s correlation analyses. Bonsmara and Bonsmara X Angus had lower basal cortisol (CS) than Angus and Brahman steers. Angus steers had greater adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, and responded faster to CRH than the other breedtypes. Bonsmara steers were slower in responding to CRH, and returning to basal CS following ACTH or CRH administration. Angus and Bonsmara X Angus grew faster during the finishing phase than Brahman or Bonsmara steers. Angus had higher quality grades than other breedtypes; rib-eye area and hot carcass weight were greater in Angus than Brahman steers, but similar among Angus, Bonsmara X Angus and Bonsmara steers. Angus and Brahman were less docile than Bonsmara and Bonsmara X Angus steers. Angus steers had higher respiration rates and serum concentrations of sodium, lower aldosterone during moderate heat exposure, and lesser serum concentrations of glucose, urea and cholesterol than tropically-influenced breedtypes. Angus had rectal and surface temperatures similar to those of Brahman, but greater than those of Bonsmara X Angus or Bonsmara steers. Intermediate breedtypes like the Bonsmara provide a compromise to producers, allowing them to address the demands of consumers while raising cattle better suited to survival in tropical climates. Advisors/Committee Members: H., Welsh Jr., Thomas (advisor), Carstens, Gordon E. (committee member), Forbes, T.D.A. (committee member), Randel, Ronald D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Stress; Growth

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jacobs Hollenbeck, R. (2006). Evaluation of adrenal function, growth, carcass characteristics, blood metabolites, hematological and immune parameters in Angus, Brahman, Bonsmara X Angus and Bonsmara beef steers. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4435

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jacobs Hollenbeck, Regina. “Evaluation of adrenal function, growth, carcass characteristics, blood metabolites, hematological and immune parameters in Angus, Brahman, Bonsmara X Angus and Bonsmara beef steers.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4435.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jacobs Hollenbeck, Regina. “Evaluation of adrenal function, growth, carcass characteristics, blood metabolites, hematological and immune parameters in Angus, Brahman, Bonsmara X Angus and Bonsmara beef steers.” 2006. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Jacobs Hollenbeck R. Evaluation of adrenal function, growth, carcass characteristics, blood metabolites, hematological and immune parameters in Angus, Brahman, Bonsmara X Angus and Bonsmara beef steers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4435.

Council of Science Editors:

Jacobs Hollenbeck R. Evaluation of adrenal function, growth, carcass characteristics, blood metabolites, hematological and immune parameters in Angus, Brahman, Bonsmara X Angus and Bonsmara beef steers. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4435

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