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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Goldsby, Diane"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Li, Xiaobao. Cognitive analysis of students' errors and misconceptions in variables, equations, and functions.

Degree: 2009, Texas A&M University

The fundamental goal of this study is to explore why so many students have difficulty learning mathematics. To achieve this goal, this study focuses on why so many students keep making the same errors over a long period of time. To explore such issues, three basic algebra concepts - variable, equation, and function ? are used to analyze students? errors, possible buggy algorithms, and the conceptual basis of these errors: misconceptions. Through the research on these three basic concepts, it is expected that a more general principle of understanding and the corresponding learning difficulties can be illustrated by the case studies. Although students? errors varied to a great extent, certain types of errors related to students? misconceptions occurred frequently and repeatedly after one year of additional instruction. Thus, it is possible to identify students? misconceptions through working on students? systematic errors. The causes of students? robust misconceptions were explored by comparing high-achieving and low-achieving students? understanding of these three concepts at the object (structural) or process (operational) levels. In addition, high achieving students were found to prefer using object (structural) thinking to solve problems even if the problems could be solved through both algebra and arithmetic approaches. It was also found that the relationship between students? misconception and object-process thinking explained why some misconceptions were particularly difficult to change. Students? understanding of concepts at either of two stages (process and object) interacted with either of two aspects (correct conception and misconception). When students had understood a concept as a process with misconception, such misconception was particularly hard to change. In addition, other concerns, such as rethinking the misconception of the ?equal sign,? the influence of prior experience on students? learning, misconceptions and recycling curriculum, and developing teachers? initial subject knowledge were also discussed. The findings of this study demonstrated that the fundamental reason of misconception of ?equal sign? was the misunderstanding of either side of equation as a process rather than as an object. Due to the existence of robust misconceptions as stated in this study, the use of recycling curriculum may have negative effect on students? understanding of mathematics. Advisors/Committee Members: Kulm, Gerald (advisor), Li, Yeping (advisor), Goldsby, Diane (committee member), Willson, Victor (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: errors; misconceptions; object and process

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Li, X. (2009). Cognitive analysis of students' errors and misconceptions in variables, equations, and functions. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1098

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Xiaobao. “Cognitive analysis of students' errors and misconceptions in variables, equations, and functions.” 2009. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1098.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Xiaobao. “Cognitive analysis of students' errors and misconceptions in variables, equations, and functions.” 2009. Web. 20 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Li X. Cognitive analysis of students' errors and misconceptions in variables, equations, and functions. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2019 Mar 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1098.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Li X. Cognitive analysis of students' errors and misconceptions in variables, equations, and functions. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1098

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

2. Venegas, Annette Mich?le. Developing Kindergarten and Second Grade Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Academic Science Vocabulary Instruction.

Degree: 2014, Texas A&M University

An extensive academic vocabulary in science is a critical component required for students' abilities to construct their own conceptual understandings about how things work in the natural and designed worlds. While science curriculum reformers use hands-on, minds-on scientific investigations to form the heart of science learning for young children, the acquisition of science vocabulary is also an essential part of the process of science learning. Words allow students to communicate their ideas to others and "make sense" of the world. Words are the representations of experiences and ideas about students' experiences within the world. Despite the importance of vocabulary acquisition, little research has been done on methods for teaching primary students academic science vocabulary. The purpose of this study was to explore how professional development alters primary grade teachers' abilities to incorporate vocabulary instruction during science lessons. The solution explored in this record of study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of a self-designed model for professional learning preparing teachers in primary grades to teach academic science vocabulary. This model included four and a half hours of professional learning, a pre- and post- vocabulary questionnaire, four classroom observations including instructional support and coaching, post-observation conversations, one interview per participant, and one group discussion. The study took place over a four-month period. Participants included three kindergarten teachers and three second-grade teachers, and took place in a rural public primary school near San Antonio, Texas. The researcher used a mixed methods approach to investigate teachers' subsequent use of vocabulary instruction methods in their own classes while teaching science. Quantitative data were collected from teachers' responses to the Science Vocabulary Questionnaire (SVQ). Additionally, the rating scale on the Science Classroom Observation Worksheet (SCOW) was used to generate a scaled score. Qualitative data included teachers' open-ended responses from the SVQ, observational notes entered on the Rationale for Rating section on the SCOW, teachers' responses to post-observation interview questions, and teachers' responses during the informal group discussion. Analyses of the data revealed five out of six teachers implemented suggested methods of teaching academic science vocabulary during their science lessons. Furthermore, four of the six teachers consistently improved their practices of teaching vocabulary instruction after each individual professional development sessions. In the teachers? final remarks regarding their professional development experiences, five out of six teachers stated they believed the individualized model of professional support was more effective than whole group professional development. Results from this exploratory study provide preliminary evidence associating the professional development model the researcher developed with teachers' improved used of vocabulary… Advisors/Committee Members: Stuessy, Carol (advisor), Goldsby, Diane (advisor), Loving, Cathleen (committee member), Scott, Timothy (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: vocabulary instruction; primary grades; science

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Venegas, A. M. (2014). Developing Kindergarten and Second Grade Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Academic Science Vocabulary Instruction. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153892

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Venegas, Annette Mich?le. “Developing Kindergarten and Second Grade Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Academic Science Vocabulary Instruction.” 2014. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153892.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Venegas, Annette Mich?le. “Developing Kindergarten and Second Grade Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Academic Science Vocabulary Instruction.” 2014. Web. 20 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Venegas AM. Developing Kindergarten and Second Grade Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Academic Science Vocabulary Instruction. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153892.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Venegas AM. Developing Kindergarten and Second Grade Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Academic Science Vocabulary Instruction. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153892

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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