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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Goidel, Robert K"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Merrill, Alison Higgins. The Dynamics of Issue Attention on the United States Supreme Court.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2018, Texas A&M University

Throughout history, the United States Supreme Court has served as a major player in shaping the character and direction of public policy through the decisions it hands down. The issues that have garnered the Court’s attention have also changed over time, suggesting that the type of cases that receive certiorari fluctuate according to judicial preferences. Most research on certiorari has highlighted the importance of this process for understanding judicial decision-making, especially in regards to which cases are selected for review. But, we know less about the importance of issues in the agenda-setting process, and why issues, not specific cases, explain agenda-setting. This project brings together a theoretical framework that focuses on the influence of macro-level considerations on certiorari with a methodological emphasis on explaining dynamic agenda-setting. The macro-political theory of agenda setting produces three predictions about the dynamics of issue attention on the Supreme Court. First, the Supreme Court’s issue attention should shift toward policy domains over which Republicans exert greater issue ownership as the membership of the Court becomes more conservative, and, conversely, the Court should pay greater attention to policy domains over which Democrats have stronger issue ownership as the Court becomes more liberal. Second, the Court’s issue attention should follow public perceptions of problems in the political, economic, or social environment, leading the Court to take more cases in issue areas where the American people identify important public problems. Finally, the Court’s issue agenda should respond to changes in the political, economic and social environment that produce changes in the volume of litigation activity in particular policy domains, influencing the composition of the set of cases from which the Court constructs its docket and, therefore, its issue agenda. Another contribution of this dissertation is the introduction of compositional dependent variable models to judicial politics. This methodology examines the trade-off relationships that shape the Supreme Court’s agenda over time, with the underlying theory that the composition of the agenda reflects the relative importance of the Court’s partisan priorities. Using this approach, the data indicate that the partisan composition of the Court alters the policy preferences represented on the judicial agenda and that there are trade-off relationships that have been largely masked by exploring the ebb and flow of issue attention across different issue areas separately. The results indicate that issue attention by the U.S. Supreme Court is not merely the result of the incidental aggregation of the policy domains in which individual cases are situated. The Court’s attention to different issues is systematically associated with macro-political dynamics in the ideological orientations of the Court’s members and the political environment. This mirrors patterns of aggregate issue attention in the elected branches of national government and… Advisors/Committee Members: Ura, Joseph D (advisor), Kellstedt, Paul M (committee member), Cook, Scott J (committee member), Goidel, Robert K (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Supreme Court; Agenda Setting; Judicial Politics; Certiorari

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Merrill, A. H. (2018). The Dynamics of Issue Attention on the United States Supreme Court. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174166

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Merrill, Alison Higgins. “The Dynamics of Issue Attention on the United States Supreme Court.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174166.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Merrill, Alison Higgins. “The Dynamics of Issue Attention on the United States Supreme Court.” 2018. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Merrill AH. The Dynamics of Issue Attention on the United States Supreme Court. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174166.

Council of Science Editors:

Merrill AH. The Dynamics of Issue Attention on the United States Supreme Court. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174166

2. Chen, Hongliang. Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks.

Degree: PhD, Communication, 2017, Texas A&M University

The current study tests the third-person effect (TPE) in the context of Internet privacy. TPE refers to the phenomenon that people tend to perceive greater media effects on others than on themselves. The behavioral component of TPE holds that the self-others perceptual gap is positively associated with support for restricting harmful media messages. Using a sample (N=613) from Amazon Mturk, the current research documented firm support for the perceptual and behavioral components of TPE in the context of Internet privacy. Moreover, social distance, perceived Internet privacy knowledge, negative online privacy experiences, and Internet use were found to be significant predictors of the TPE perceptions of Internet privacy risks. There are four novel contributions of the current study. First, this study systematically tests TPE in a new context―Internet privacy. Second, this study examines five antecedents of TPE perceptions, of which perceived Internet privacy knowledge, negative online privacy experiences, and Internet use are novel to TPE studies. Unlike prior studies which assume social distance and desirability of media content, the current study provides direct empirical tests of these two antecedents. Third, prior research primarily examines support for censorship of harmful media messages, a context in which individuals do not have control over policy enforcement. In the case of Internet privacy, people can decide whether to adopt privacy protective measures or not. The current study addresses two types of behavioral intentions to reduce privacy risks: (1) the willingness to adopt online privacy protection measures; and (2) recommend such measures to others. Fourth, unlike prior studies using fear based theories to investigate Internet privacy issues, the current tests Internet privacy from a novel perspective—TPE theory. Advisors/Committee Members: Goidel, Robert K (advisor), Street, Richard L (committee member), Lueck, Jennifer (committee member), Yoon, Myeongsun (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Third person effect; Internet privacy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, H. (2017). Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165727

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Hongliang. “Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165727.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Hongliang. “Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks.” 2017. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Chen H. Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165727.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen H. Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165727

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