Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Esteve-Gasent, Maria D"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Texas A&M University

1. Modarelli II, Joseph James. Novel Molecular Strategies for the Detection and Characterization of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Domestic Dogs.

Degree: PhD, Genetics, 2018, Texas A&M University

Tick-borne diseases (TBD) are common across the United States and can result in critical and chronic disease states in a variety of veterinary patients, specifically domesticated dogs. Borreliosis, anaplasmosis, rickettsiosis, ehrlichiosis, and babesiosis have been cited as the most common TBDs. Despite recent reports revealing past exposure of TBD, there are no molecular epidemiological reports for dogs in Texas. Therefore, data to support the level of actively infected dogs in the population is inadequate. Limited molecular data for TBDs is due, in part, to the lack of consolidated molecular tools available to researchers. Real-time PCR (qPCR) assays are a commonly utilized tool for molecular detection of TBDs, and achieve species specificity by assigning each pathogen a unique fluorogenic label. However, current limitations of qPCR instruments include restricting the number of fluorogenic labels that can be differentiated by the instrument per a given reaction. As such, this dissertation explored the development of a qPCR methodology, termed layerplexing, that would allow for the simultaneous detection and characterization of 11 pathogens responsible for causing common TBDs in domestic dogs. Additionally, an endogenous internal positive control was designed and integrated into the assay for quality assurance of attained molecular results. Analysis revealed that the layerplex assay format was comparable in terms of target sensitivity and specificity to other qPCR assays utilized in the field. The layerplex assay was then applied to conducting a molecular prevalence investigation of TBDs affecting dogs across Texas ecoregions. By conducting molecular prevalence studies for TBDs, updated rates of active exposure and specific regions that may contain sentinels of disease could be identified. Results obtained indicated molecular prevalence of borrelial, rickettsial, and babesial pathogens varied across the Texas study area and indicated specific regions where susceptible hosts may be at higher risk for infection with TBD. Furthermore, the layerplex assay lead to the first reported molecular detection of Anaplasma platys in Texas and coinfection with Ehrlichia canis and A. platys in Texas dogs. Overall, findings from this dissertation provided substantial evidence that the layerplex technique can be utilized for grouping multiple targets under a single fluorogenic label without impeding diagnostic efficacy. The layerplex technique also demonstrated utility in facilitating large scale molecular analyses of animals in Texas. Surveillance data obtained from this study may aid public health agencies in updating maps depicting high-risk areas of disease and provide baseline data for future research aiming to characterize TBDs in additional animal models. Advisors/Committee Members: Esteve-Gasent, Maria D (advisor), Derr, James N (advisor), Ferro, Pamela J (committee member), Tomeček, John M (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: molecular diagnostics; layerplex; nucleic acid amplification test; tick-borne pathogens; zoonoses

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Modarelli II, J. J. (2018). Novel Molecular Strategies for the Detection and Characterization of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Domestic Dogs. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174467

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Modarelli II, Joseph James. “Novel Molecular Strategies for the Detection and Characterization of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Domestic Dogs.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174467.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Modarelli II, Joseph James. “Novel Molecular Strategies for the Detection and Characterization of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Domestic Dogs.” 2018. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Modarelli II JJ. Novel Molecular Strategies for the Detection and Characterization of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Domestic Dogs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174467.

Council of Science Editors:

Modarelli II JJ. Novel Molecular Strategies for the Detection and Characterization of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Domestic Dogs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174467


Texas A&M University

2. Alhaboubi, Amer Rasoolfadhl. In Vitro Growth and Molecular Characterization of Vector-Borne Intraerythrocytic Parasites of Domestic Animals and Wildlife.

Degree: PhD, Veterinary Pathobiology, 2018, Texas A&M University

Haemogregarines are a group of blood sporozoans that parasitize reptiles, most commonly turtles, or tortoises. Haemogregarine-like inclusions in the red blood cells of a severely underweight alligator snapping turtle Macrochelys temminckii Troost in Harlan were examined in this study. The morphology and morphometric data for intraerythrocytic forms found on microscopic examination were similar to Haemogregarina macrochelysi n. sp. previously reported in the same species. The 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene was cloned and five sequences deposited in the NCBI GenBank® database. All five showed ∼96 % identity to Haemogregarina balli, Hepatozoon sp., and Hemolivia stellata. A phylogenetic tree generated from the five sequences aligned with 18S rDNA sequences of other hematozoa and two outgroup species revealed the cloned sequences clustered on their own branch within the Haemogregarina spp. clade. There is no genetic data for H. macrochelysi n. sp., so it is unclear if the Texas turtle parasite is conspecific with H. macrochelysi n. sp. Babesia spp. are intraerythrocytic protozoans that parasitize mammals. Cultured Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina, parasites of cattle, were recovered from liquid nitrogen (LN₂) storage nearly 30 years after cryopreservation. Four cattle were compared as donors of red blood cells (RBC) and serum for microaerophilous stationary phase (MASP) cultures in the recovery of B. bigemina. RBC and serum from only one donor supported the growth of B. bigemina. Two B. bigemina (frozen in 1986 and 1987) and two B. bovis (both frozen in 1986) cryostocks were resuscitated from LN₂ storage and all four recovered and thrived in the donor bovine RBC and serum. In the 3rd passage after recovery, B. bovis cultures were cryopreserved. Six months later they were successfully recovered from LN₂ using RBC and serum from the same donor. This study shows that B. bovis and B. bigemina stored nearly 30 years in LN₂ can be successfully recovered in the MASP system. This study also confirms previous observations that selection of a suitable bovine donor of RBC and serum is critical to the success of the Babesia sp. culture. Two markers, 18S rRNA gene and rRNA intervening transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2 (ITS), in B. bovis and B. bigemina from Puerto Rico (PR) cattle and archived culture samples from Mexico (B. bovis) and the Virgin Islands (B. bigemina) were PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced. In total, 54 18S rDNA and 21 ITS sequences were deposited in GenBank. The identity scores among the PR B. bovis 18S rDNA cloned sequences were 92.3% to 100%, and 97.7% to 99.99% among the archived Mexico B. bovis. PR and the Virgin Islands B. bigemina 18S rDNA sequence identity scores ranged from 99.1% to 99.98%. The UPMGA cladogram generated from 18S rDNA sequences shows the clear distinction of B. bovis and B. bigemina (and B. ovis). The PR ITS cloned sequences showed 69.3% to 100% identity among them. In the UPMGA cladogram, the PR sequences fell into seven different groups, except for one outlier that branched… Advisors/Committee Members: Esteve-Gasent, Maria D (advisor), Holman, Patricia J (advisor), Logan, Linda (committee member), Pérez de Léon, Adalberto A (committee member), Berghman, Luc R (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Blood sporozoans; Haemogregarines; Babesia bovis; Babesia bigemina; culture; Genotying

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alhaboubi, A. R. (2018). In Vitro Growth and Molecular Characterization of Vector-Borne Intraerythrocytic Parasites of Domestic Animals and Wildlife. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173687

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alhaboubi, Amer Rasoolfadhl. “In Vitro Growth and Molecular Characterization of Vector-Borne Intraerythrocytic Parasites of Domestic Animals and Wildlife.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173687.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alhaboubi, Amer Rasoolfadhl. “In Vitro Growth and Molecular Characterization of Vector-Borne Intraerythrocytic Parasites of Domestic Animals and Wildlife.” 2018. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Alhaboubi AR. In Vitro Growth and Molecular Characterization of Vector-Borne Intraerythrocytic Parasites of Domestic Animals and Wildlife. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173687.

Council of Science Editors:

Alhaboubi AR. In Vitro Growth and Molecular Characterization of Vector-Borne Intraerythrocytic Parasites of Domestic Animals and Wildlife. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173687

.