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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Dror, Olga"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Chavanne, Jonathan Blackshear. Upriver to Hue and Dong Ha: The U.S. Navy's War in I Corps, Vietnam 1967-1970.

Degree: 2012, Texas A&M University

The United States Navy's involvement in the Vietnam War, especially its role in the region's inland waterways, has long been an overshadowed aspect of the conflict. Most histories ignore or minimize the Navy's contribution, especially its river patrol or 'brown water' role. Through archival and library research as well as interviews with U.S Navy Vietnam War veterans this thesis demonstrates the vital role played by the brown water navy in the northern provinces of South Vietnam. A key but understudied component of this effort was Task Force Clearwater, an improvised brown water fleet that-along with the maritime logistics campaign that it supported-would prove essential for the successful defense of South Vietnam's northernmost provinces and demonstrate the vital importance of inland naval power. Task Force Clearwater and its supported maritime logistics effort form a little explored component of the U.S. Navy's role in South Vietnam. A brown water task force that proved essential for the successful defense of the northern provinces of I Corps, Clearwater repeatedly demonstrated the vital importance of inland naval power and the critical need for reliable and protected routes of supply. The task force revealed many lessons that had been long understood, forgotten, and then relearned by the U.S. Navy, among them that control of inland waterways was perhaps the most advantageous form of logistical supply in war. Created in part to satisfy the ancient maxim of "keeping the supply lines open", the task force's role broadened with time. In the course of its existence the men and boats of Clearwater would provide not only the tools of war in I Corps but also provide key lessons for the future. Advisors/Committee Members: Bradford, James C. (advisor), Dror, Olga (committee member), Dickson, D B. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: brown water navy; PBR; riverine; inland waterways; logistics; lines of communications; LCU; LCM; task force; Clearwater; Game Warden; Market Time; Vietnam War; I Corps

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APA (6th Edition):

Chavanne, J. B. (2012). Upriver to Hue and Dong Ha: The U.S. Navy's War in I Corps, Vietnam 1967-1970. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10454

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chavanne, Jonathan Blackshear. “Upriver to Hue and Dong Ha: The U.S. Navy's War in I Corps, Vietnam 1967-1970.” 2012. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10454.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chavanne, Jonathan Blackshear. “Upriver to Hue and Dong Ha: The U.S. Navy's War in I Corps, Vietnam 1967-1970.” 2012. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Chavanne JB. Upriver to Hue and Dong Ha: The U.S. Navy's War in I Corps, Vietnam 1967-1970. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10454.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chavanne JB. Upriver to Hue and Dong Ha: The U.S. Navy's War in I Corps, Vietnam 1967-1970. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10454

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

2. Bath, David William. Flameout: The Rise and Fall of Missiles in the U.S. Air Force, 1957-1967.

Degree: 2015, Texas A&M University

This dissertation documents how the U.S. national perspective toward ballistic nuclear missiles changed dramatically between 1957 and 1967 and how the actions and attitudes of this time brought about long term difficulties for the nation, the Air Force, and the missile community. In 1957, national leaders believed that ballistic missiles would replace the manned bomber and be used to win an anticipated third world war between communist and capitalist nations. Only ten years later, the United States was deep into a limited war in Vietnam and had all but proscribed the use of nuclear missiles. This dissertation uses oral histories, memoirs, service school theses, and formerly classified government documents and histories to determine how and why the nation changed its outlook on nuclear ballistic missiles so quickly. The dissertation contends that because scientists and engineers created the revolutionary weapon at the beginning of the Cold War, when the U.S. and U.S.S.R. were struggling for influence and power, many national leaders urged the military to design and build nuclear ballistic missiles before the Soviet Union could do so. This pressure prompted the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force to compete for the new mission and wasted billions of dollars as the services built duplicative, unreliable and unsafe liquid fueled missiles that were only in use for a few years. Then, as the Cuban Missile Crisis revealed the true threat of nuclear conflict, the perspective towards nuclear missiles changed considerably. The dissertation also argues that the Air Force garnered control of the new capability, primarily to retain and protect their manned strategic air mission, so it chose not to deal with inherent problems of missile duty that were revealed almost immediately, such as loneliness, boredom, tedium, and an inability to find a sense of accomplishment. Once U.S. political leaders turned their focus away from nuclear war and toward the Vietnam conflict, the Air Force relegated the missileers  – those selected to operate the new missiles  – to secondary status, allowing their concerns to fester for decades. Missileers created a proud, but dysfunctional organization that rewarded what Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James in 2014 called unrealistic test scores rather than operational experience and expertise. At the same time, the Air Force intensified an unhealthy focus on manned flight that prevented the service from most effectively incorporating and using advances in technology to defend the nation. Advisors/Committee Members: Dawson III, Joseph G. (advisor), Anderson, Terry H. (committee member), Dror, Olga (committee member), Pulley Hudson, Angela (committee member), Burk, James (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Air Force; ballistic missiles; ICBM; Cuban Missile Crisis; missileers; nuclear conflict; social change

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bath, D. W. (2015). Flameout: The Rise and Fall of Missiles in the U.S. Air Force, 1957-1967. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156176

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bath, David William. “Flameout: The Rise and Fall of Missiles in the U.S. Air Force, 1957-1967.” 2015. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156176.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bath, David William. “Flameout: The Rise and Fall of Missiles in the U.S. Air Force, 1957-1967.” 2015. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bath DW. Flameout: The Rise and Fall of Missiles in the U.S. Air Force, 1957-1967. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156176.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bath DW. Flameout: The Rise and Fall of Missiles in the U.S. Air Force, 1957-1967. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156176

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

3. Chavanne, Jonathan Blackshear. The Battle for China: The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and the Cold War in Asia, 1944-1949.

Degree: PhD, History, 2017, Texas A&M University

The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps’ long history in China before World War II was a prelude to a little known struggle. In the aftermath of Japan’s surrender in August 1945, the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps embarked on a complex series of operations to rescue Allied prisoners of war, stabilize North China, and repatriate millions of Japanese soldiers and civilians. The more than 50,000 Marines and over a hundred vessels of the U.S. Seventh Fleet committed to China repatriated over three million Japanese and transported 200,000 Chinese Nationalist soldiers to North China. While doing so, they became enmeshed in the complex military and political landscape that was the Chinese Civil War. Over the next four years, U.S. Navy leaders, intent on reestablishing the longstanding presence and strategic role of the Navy in China, opposed efforts by the U.S. Army and State Department to withdraw all U.S. forces from the vast country. From 1944 to 1949, a core group of civilian and naval leaders worked steadily to shore up Nationalist China in the face of a growing and intractable Chinese Communist Party. Unwavering in their view that China was a strategic priority and that Asia stood at the forefront of the nascent Cold War, these leaders repeatedly clashed with General George C. Marshall and President Harry Truman. Exacerbated by an atmosphere of distrust and intra-service rivalry, this conflict over China revealed stark divisions between the U.S. Navy and its sister services, and illuminated inherent differences as the United States struggled to come to terms with both the new Cold War and the reality of nuclear warfare. Advisors/Committee Members: Bradford, James C (advisor), Dror, Olga M (committee member), Parker, Jason C (committee member), Dickson, D Bruce (committee member), Paine, Sally M (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: United States Navy; United States Marine Corps; Intra-service rivarly; Asia; Cold War

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chavanne, J. B. (2017). The Battle for China: The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and the Cold War in Asia, 1944-1949. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/159085

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chavanne, Jonathan Blackshear. “The Battle for China: The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and the Cold War in Asia, 1944-1949.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/159085.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chavanne, Jonathan Blackshear. “The Battle for China: The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and the Cold War in Asia, 1944-1949.” 2017. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Chavanne JB. The Battle for China: The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and the Cold War in Asia, 1944-1949. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/159085.

Council of Science Editors:

Chavanne JB. The Battle for China: The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and the Cold War in Asia, 1944-1949. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/159085

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