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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Dorsey, Alicia M."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Boenker, Madeline Lee. Scared Textless: The Influence of Sensation Seeking Tendencies and Need for Cognition on Texting while Driving Fear Appeals.

Degree: MA, Communication, 2012, Texas A&M University

Texting is ubiquitous; the International Association for the Wireless Telecommunications Industry reported that 4.1 billion text messages were sent per day in the first half of 2009. In isolation, texting does not injure individuals; however, when combined with driving, lives have changed for the worse. The National Safety Council estimates that 1.6 million crashes per year can be attributed to distracted drivers either talking on cell phones or texting while driving and nearly 28 percent of all crashes in the United States can be ascribed to these behaviors. An increasing number of texting while driving fear appeal campaigns are being utilized in the media. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to create and test theoretically-based messages aimed at discouraging texting while driving. Formative research along with the Extended Parallel Process Model was used for guidance in the creation of the fear appeal messages. No low threat message was used for the main study after repeated message validations failed. For the study, three high threat messages varied only by a single paragraph which targeted beliefs about benefits, mastery, and ubiquity of texting while driving. 155 undergraduates at Texas A & M University completed a pretest, read the high threat message, and answered a posttest. Need for cognition and sensation seeking tendencies were measured in order to understand the effects such personality traits have on message perceptions. Five major outcomes were revealed even though numerous hypotheses were unsupported. There was a significant interaction between perceived threat and sensation seeking tendencies on message realism. There was a significant interaction between perceived threat and need for cognition on message realism. There was a significant interaction between perceived threat and need for cognition on message accuracy. There was a significant interaction between perceived threat and need for cognition on attitudes. There was a significant positive correlation between perceived threat and perceived message sensation value. This project provides support that sensation seeking tendencies and need for cognition do interacted with perceived threat on perceptions of message effectiveness and that perceived message sensation value was positively related to perceived threat. Results also revealed the prevalence of texting while driving behavior and relationships between personality traits and texting while driving. Sensation seeking tendencies were positively correlated with initiating text messages while driving. Need for cognition was negatively correlated with reading and replying to text messages while driving. Advisors/Committee Members: Stephenson, Michael T. (advisor), Dorsey, Alicia M. (committee member), Beaudoin, Christopher E. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: campaigns; sensation seeking; need for cognition; texting while driving; fear appeals; the extended parallel process model

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Boenker, M. L. (2012). Scared Textless: The Influence of Sensation Seeking Tendencies and Need for Cognition on Texting while Driving Fear Appeals. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-08-9918

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boenker, Madeline Lee. “Scared Textless: The Influence of Sensation Seeking Tendencies and Need for Cognition on Texting while Driving Fear Appeals.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-08-9918.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boenker, Madeline Lee. “Scared Textless: The Influence of Sensation Seeking Tendencies and Need for Cognition on Texting while Driving Fear Appeals.” 2012. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Boenker ML. Scared Textless: The Influence of Sensation Seeking Tendencies and Need for Cognition on Texting while Driving Fear Appeals. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-08-9918.

Council of Science Editors:

Boenker ML. Scared Textless: The Influence of Sensation Seeking Tendencies and Need for Cognition on Texting while Driving Fear Appeals. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-08-9918


Texas A&M University

2. Head, Katharine J. Tanning bed use, deviance regulation theory, and source factors.

Degree: MA, Speech Communication, 2009, Texas A&M University

Tanning bed use, especially among young, white females, has become a serious health problem in the United States. Those who use tanning beds value a tanned appearance; thus, one possible way to get individuals to stop using tanning beds is to persuade them to begin using an alternative method: a sunless tanner. This study sought to use persuasive messages to encourage individuals to both stop using tanning beds and start using a sunless tanner. Deviance Regulation Theory (DRT) was used to design three messages, and source expertise was manipulated (high and low). In addition, attitudes, perceived norms, benefits and threats about tanning were examined. Results indicate that the combination of DRT message design and source expertise produced several message conditions that were effective at decreasing tanning bed use intent. No combined message condition was effective at changing sunless tanner use intent. DRT message design alone did not produce results, nor did source expertise. Tanning attitudes were influenced by reference groups, and perceived norms about tanning predicted individual‘s tanning bed use for several reference groups. In addition, there was an interaction between benefits and threats of tanning. Advisors/Committee Members: Dorsey, Alicia M. (advisor), Stephenson, Michael T. (advisor), Ramasubramanian, Srividya (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: tanning bed use; source credibility

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Head, K. J. (2009). Tanning bed use, deviance regulation theory, and source factors. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2368

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Head, Katharine J. “Tanning bed use, deviance regulation theory, and source factors.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2368.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Head, Katharine J. “Tanning bed use, deviance regulation theory, and source factors.” 2009. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Head KJ. Tanning bed use, deviance regulation theory, and source factors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2368.

Council of Science Editors:

Head KJ. Tanning bed use, deviance regulation theory, and source factors. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2368


Texas A&M University

3. Quick, Brian Lee. An explication of the reactance processing model.

Degree: PhD, Speech Communication, 2005, Texas A&M University

The present dissertation applied the theoretical assumptions of Psychological Reactance Theory into a model depicting how individuals cognitively process reactanceinducing print messages utilizing a communication framework, the Reactance Processing Model (RPM). Specifically, the RPM conceptualizes reactance as a motivational state, investigates the degree of reactance arousal elicited by threat-tochoice, vivid, and explicit language (along with an additive effect of the aforementioned message features), empirically measures reactance restoration, and explores the role of issue involvement on message processing of reactance-inducing print messages advocating exercise and sunscreen usage by college students (N = 550). The RPM was tested using an experimental 2 (implicit vs. explicit) X 2 (non-vivid vs. vivid) X 2 (lowthreat- to-choice language vs. high-threat-to-choice language) posttest only design. Four general conclusions are drawn from this investigation. First, results support operationalizing reactance as a latent construct comprised of unfavorable cognitions and state anger. Second, of the three message features examined, high threat-to-choice and vivid language, along with a combination of both were found to elicit reactance. Explicit language did not trigger reactance in this study. Third, perceived high threat-tochoice language was positively associated with reactance whereas perceived vivid and explicit language was either negatively or not associated with reactance. Fourth, reactance was positively related to three types of restoration including ??Boomerang,?? ??Related Boomerang,?? and ??Vicarious Boomerang.?? Specifically, ??Boomerang?? restoration appears to be triggered regardless of threat attractiveness whereas ??Related Boomerang?? and ??Vicarious Boomerang?? require an attractive threat before being set into motion. Results from this investigation along with the limitations and heuristic value of the RPM are provided. Advisors/Committee Members: Stephenson, Michael T. (advisor), Dorsey, Alicia M. (committee member), Miller, Katherine I. (committee member), Street, Richard L. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Reactance; Cognitive Processing; Health

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Quick, B. L. (2005). An explication of the reactance processing model. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2634

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Quick, Brian Lee. “An explication of the reactance processing model.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2634.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Quick, Brian Lee. “An explication of the reactance processing model.” 2005. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Quick BL. An explication of the reactance processing model. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2005. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2634.

Council of Science Editors:

Quick BL. An explication of the reactance processing model. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2634

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