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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Donnellan, M. Brent"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Ruchensky, Jared Robert. The Validity of a Youth Measure of the Triarchic Model of Psychopathy.

Degree: 2017, Texas A&M University

The Triarchic Model suggests that psychopathy is comprised of three phenotypic constructs, including disinhibition (i.e., elevated impulsivity combined with negative affect), meanness (i.e., interpersonal antagonism and callousness), and boldness (i.e., social charm and resistance to stress). Recently, the field has just begun to examine whether Triarchic traits exist and can be measured in youth populations. Specifically, researchers have recently devised scales measuring these three constructs using items from the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) and found some support for their validity in a college sample. This study extended previous research by examining the psychometric properties of the YPI-Triarchic scales in a large, multi-site adolescent offender sample using a myriad of criterion measures (e.g., psychopathy, personality, antisocial behavior, psychopathology). Results suggested some limited support for the YPI-Triarchic scales, although significant concern exists regarding the practical utility of these scales in both clinical (e.g., predicting recidivism) and research settings. Advisors/Committee Members: Edens, John F (advisor), Donnellan, M Brent (committee member), Elliott, Timothy R (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: psychopathy; YPI

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ruchensky, J. R. (2017). The Validity of a Youth Measure of the Triarchic Model of Psychopathy. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161345

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ruchensky, Jared Robert. “The Validity of a Youth Measure of the Triarchic Model of Psychopathy.” 2017. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed May 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161345.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ruchensky, Jared Robert. “The Validity of a Youth Measure of the Triarchic Model of Psychopathy.” 2017. Web. 29 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Ruchensky JR. The Validity of a Youth Measure of the Triarchic Model of Psychopathy. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2017. [cited 2020 May 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161345.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ruchensky JR. The Validity of a Youth Measure of the Triarchic Model of Psychopathy. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161345

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

2. Tibbett, Thomas P. The Personality Consistency Scale.

Degree: 2017, Texas A&M University

Perceived personality consistency is the degree to which an individual believes their personality is reliable across situations. Perceived personality consistency may contribute to the personality variability literature because it is a separate individual difference measure, rather than measuring change in personality trait self-reports. Rather than assessing actual change, perceived personality consistency involves the extent to which people see themselves changing. This individual difference measure should be associated with specific attitudes, cognitive styles, and behavior beyond that of trait measures. To capture this construct, I created a Personality Consistency Scale (PCS), assessing perceived personality consistency between contexts. Next, I assessed incremental validity in order to compare this scale to similar measures in variability and creativity research. Results found psychometric support for a 5-item inventory, which correlated with authenticity, indecision, meaning in life, and creative flexibility performance on the Alternative Uses Task. This scale explained variance above that of the conceptually similar Self-Pluralism scale and in conjunction with the personality trait openness to experience. These results suggest that perceived personality consistency should be assessed in addition to standard trait measures when predicting creative performance. Advisors/Committee Members: Lench, Heather C (advisor), Donnellan, M. Brent (committee member), Smith, Steven M (committee member), Barrick, Murray R (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: personality consistency; personality; variability; psychometrics; creativity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tibbett, T. P. (2017). The Personality Consistency Scale. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161422

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tibbett, Thomas P. “The Personality Consistency Scale.” 2017. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed May 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161422.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tibbett, Thomas P. “The Personality Consistency Scale.” 2017. Web. 29 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Tibbett TP. The Personality Consistency Scale. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2017. [cited 2020 May 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161422.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tibbett TP. The Personality Consistency Scale. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161422

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

3. Zimmerman, Carla A. Confrontation: An Interpersonal Response to Ostracism.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, Texas A&M University

Confrontation is defined as expressing displeasure with mistreatment and is a behavioral response to ostracism – being ignored and excluded by others. According to the temporal need-threat model of ostracism, targets’ interpersonal behaviors following ostracism act to restore depleted need satisfaction and mood. The aims of this research were 1) to examine the use of confrontation in response to ostracism, and 2) to study its effectiveness as a coping method. In sum, these studies established confrontation as a frequent response to ostracism that is influenced by both the targets’ psychological response and the social context in which it occurs. Four experiments were conducted using participants from an introductory psychology subject pool. Study 1 manipulated ostracism to targets’ attitudes towards contacting the sources of ostracism. Study 2 used a mixed design and behavioral measure of confrontation to examine how frequently people confront, and potential effects on need-satisfaction and mood over time. Study 3 manipulated the coping method used following ostracism to compare confrontation’s effectiveness to a solo writing task and a distraction task. Study 4 examined individual differences and contextual factors that influence the likelihood of confrontation. Study 1 found that while participants most preferred to take no action, public contact with the ostracism sources was preferred over other options. In Study 2, one in three ostracized participants chose to confront, more frequent than included participants. Study 3 found that confrontation was more effective for reducing anger than the writing task. Distraction was more effective in increasing need-satisfaction compared to the confrontation task. Study 4 showed that male gender, need-depletion, and negative affect increased the likelihood of confrontation. However, these effects varied based on whether or not participants believed they were playing with members of their racial in-group or out-group. In sum, confrontation was a common response to ostracism. The usage of confrontation was influenced by sadness as well as interactions between social context and psychological responses or individual differences. Advisors/Committee Members: Carter-Sowell, Adrienne R (advisor), Donnellan, M. Brent (committee member), Keith, Verna M (committee member), Mathur, Vani A (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Ostracism; Confrontation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zimmerman, C. A. (2017). Confrontation: An Interpersonal Response to Ostracism. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165944

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zimmerman, Carla A. “Confrontation: An Interpersonal Response to Ostracism.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed May 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165944.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zimmerman, Carla A. “Confrontation: An Interpersonal Response to Ostracism.” 2017. Web. 29 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Zimmerman CA. Confrontation: An Interpersonal Response to Ostracism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. [cited 2020 May 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165944.

Council of Science Editors:

Zimmerman CA. Confrontation: An Interpersonal Response to Ostracism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165944

.