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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Dague, Laura"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Zheng, Yiying. Essays on Health and Public Economics.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2017, Texas A&M University

This dissertation introduces three essays on health and public economics. In the first essay, I reexamine how false ID laws with scanner provisions affect underage drinking. Yoruk uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and finds that false ID laws with scanner provisions have large impacts on underage drinking. I first demonstrate that analyses based on NLSY97 data fail falsification exercises testing for significant pre-intervention effects, and that the estimated effects based on these data are highly sensitive to the inclusion of a lead term and to sample selection, which weakens confidence in the large estimated effects reported in the previous literature. I then use data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System for the analysis and show that estimates based on these data indicate that these policies have no effect on underage drinking behavior. In the second essay, I take advantage of the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure process to analyze the effect of government spending on local economic conditions. Exploiting variation in the timing and amount of construction funding provided across counties, my analyses yield an estimated cost per job of $65,000 per year and a local fiscal multiplier of 1.21. Analyses of neighboring counties show little evidence of spillover effects. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these results, I investigate the effects of government spending on migration and show that the funding has positive effects on in-migration, but these effects are too small to explain the main results. In the final essay, we examine how childbearing responds to changes in economic conditions. We exploit variation driven by the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure process, in which $25 billion of construction funding was distributed across the United States in different amounts and at different points in time. We show that this stimulus improved men’s—but not women’s—economic conditions, providing a rare opportunity to assess different theoretical models of childbearing. We find that the stimulus led to significant increases in birth rates. These results are consistent with models in which child quantity is a normal good and women’s foregone earnings are a major component of the costs of having children. Advisors/Committee Members: Lindo, Jason (advisor), Hoekstra, Mark (committee member), Meer, Jonathan (committee member), Dague, Laura (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Health Economics; Public Economics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zheng, Y. (2017). Essays on Health and Public Economics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/166007

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zheng, Yiying. “Essays on Health and Public Economics.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/166007.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zheng, Yiying. “Essays on Health and Public Economics.” 2017. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Zheng Y. Essays on Health and Public Economics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/166007.

Council of Science Editors:

Zheng Y. Essays on Health and Public Economics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/166007


Texas A&M University

2. Freytag, Jennifer Jeanene. Three Studies of the Communication Ecology of Advance Care Planning.

Degree: PhD, Communication, 2018, Texas A&M University

Using an ecological perspective, this dissertation focuses on personal and communicative factors affecting advance care planning. It situates and studies the process of advance care planning within three different contexts: an individual, cognitive context, the familial context, and the clinical context. Study One focused on beliefs and attitudes toward advance care planning using a survey that was completed by patients and their family member healthcare surrogates. The study found differing degrees of concordance for different measures of advance care planning preferences. Concordance ran from fair to good for measures of patient priorities and attitudes toward advance care planning, while concordance was low for decision-making preferences and goals. The study also found that patient perceptions of surrogate openness to talking about death predicts concordance across all but one measure. This finding provides a basis for arguing that interventions targeted exclusively at patients should also focus on surrogates. The study finally connects family communication environment types to concordance scores. Pluralistic family types, which value open communication and free thinking, are associated with improved concordance across two measures. Study Two uses a qualitative approach to focus on the way family communication environment types can be used to classify family attitudes toward advance care planning conversation and decision-making. The analysis identifies important characteristics of these family communication environments that coordinate with the way patients and surrogates frame the problem of advance care planning, the way they discuss it, and the way they approach decision making in this context. Finally, Study Three uses a mixed-methods approach to analyze secondary data from patient-clinician interactions in a clinical setting, focusing on discursive strategies physicians and patients use during conversation about end-of-life care and decision-making strategies. It highlights a gulf between patients and physicians in terms of the advance care planning content they become more engaged in discussing. Based on ratings from outside observers, the study found that patients are more engaged when talking about surrogate decision-makers in detail, while physicians are more engaged when talking about advance care planning documents. Advisors/Committee Members: Street , Richard L (advisor), Rauscher, Emily (committee member), Dague, Laura (committee member), Goidel, Kirby (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: advance care planning; family communication; clinical communication; family communication patterns; patient-physician interaction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Freytag, J. J. (2018). Three Studies of the Communication Ecology of Advance Care Planning. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173524

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Freytag, Jennifer Jeanene. “Three Studies of the Communication Ecology of Advance Care Planning.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173524.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Freytag, Jennifer Jeanene. “Three Studies of the Communication Ecology of Advance Care Planning.” 2018. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Freytag JJ. Three Studies of the Communication Ecology of Advance Care Planning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173524.

Council of Science Editors:

Freytag JJ. Three Studies of the Communication Ecology of Advance Care Planning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173524


Texas A&M University

3. Hoffmann, Manuel. Demand and Welfare in Health Economics.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2020, Texas A&M University

In this dissertation I present three projects related to the topic demand and welfare in health economics by leveraging changes in technology, institutions and policies through quasi-experimental and experimental approaches. In the first essay "Television, Health, and Happiness", which is joint work with Adrian Chadi, we study the consequences of television consumption. Watching television is the most time-consuming human activity besides work but its role for individual well-being is unclear. Negative consequences portrayed in the literature raise the question whether this popular activity constitutes an economic good or whether it is an economic bad and hence serves as a prime example of irrational behavior reducing individual health and happiness. We are the first to comprehensively address this question by exploiting a large-scale natural experiment in West Germany, where households in a few geographically restricted areas received commercial television via terrestrial frequencies. Rich panel data allow us to determine how signal availability over time changes individual time-use and well-being. Contrary to previous research, we find no health impact when television consumption increases. For life satisfaction, we even find positive effects. Additional data support the notion that television is not an economic bad and that non-experimental evidence seems to be driven by negative selection. The second essay "Vaccines at Work", which is joint work with Roberto Mosquera and Adrian Chadi, is investigating the causes and consequences of vaccination. Influenza vaccination could be a cost-effective way to reduce costs in terms of human lives and productivity losses, but low take-up rates and vaccination unintentionally causing moral hazard may decrease its benefits. We ran a natural field experiment in cooperation with a bank in Ecuador, where we experimentally manipulated incentives to participate in a health intervention, which allows us to determine the personal consequences of being randomly encouraged to get vaccinated using administrative firm data. In a first stage, we find strong evidence that opportunity costs and peers matter to increase vaccination demand. In the second stage, contrary to the company’s expectation, vaccination did not reduce sickness absence during the flu season. Getting vaccinated was ineffective with no measurable health externalities from coworker vaccination. We rule out meaningful individual health effects when considering several thresholds of expected vaccine effectiveness. Using a dataset of administrative records on medical diagnoses and employee surveys, we find evidence consistent with vaccination causing moral hazard, which could decrease the effectiveness of vaccination. The third essay studies "The Unintended Consequences of Health Insurance" in a universal health care system. Universal healthcare is associated with desirable health and equity outcomes and often allows individuals to purchase supplementary private health insurance. While the purchase of private health… Advisors/Committee Members: Petrie, Ragan (advisor), Castillo, Marco (committee member), Lindo, Jason (committee member), Dague, Laura (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Health; Happiness; Well-being; Natural experiment; Television consumption; Time-use; Entertainment; CSPT; ArcGIS; Mass media; Health Intervention, Flu Vaccination; Sickness-Related Absence; Field Experiment; Random Encouragement Design; Moral Hazard; Technology Adoption; Private Health Insurance; Universal Health Care; Supplementary Insurance; Regression Kink Design; Australia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hoffmann, M. (2020). Demand and Welfare in Health Economics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/191679

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hoffmann, Manuel. “Demand and Welfare in Health Economics.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/191679.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hoffmann, Manuel. “Demand and Welfare in Health Economics.” 2020. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Hoffmann M. Demand and Welfare in Health Economics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/191679.

Council of Science Editors:

Hoffmann M. Demand and Welfare in Health Economics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/191679

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