Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Barnhardt, Terrence M."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Texas A&M University

1. Handy, Justin Dean. The Continued March Towards Ecological Validity in Laboratory Studies of Blocked and Recovered Memories.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2015, Texas A&M University

The debate over the existence of recovered memories remains a divisive issue for mental health practitioners and cognitive scientists, in part due to a limited understanding of the processes underlying motivated forgetting behaviors. The present study argues motivated forgetting is best understood in the context of normal memory processes. For instance, previous studies utilizing a retrieval-biasing procedure, referred to as the dropout procedure, have shown that practiced avoidance activities can create profound memory blocks for lists of words and short stories. Experiment 1 addressed whether these forgetting effects extend to memories with greater personal significance, such as autobiographical memories. In Experiment 1 participants studied descriptions of target and non-target autobiographical events. Non-target memory descriptions were then re-presented several times during the practiced avoidance phase of the experiment. In contrast, target memory descriptions were “dropped out” of the study list and did not receive extra study exposures. On a subsequent memory test, significant memory deficits were observed for target memory descriptions when performance was compared to a control condition that did not participate in the practiced avoidance phase. These results provided evidence that emotionally-laden autobiographical memories are susceptible to memory blocks, and further support the theoretical contention that practiced avoidance could be used to regulate unwanted memories. The present study also examined how and under what circumstances forgetting effects following the dropout procedure occur. Experiments 2 and 3 report dissociable effects of avoidance activities involving competitive retrieval practice and incidental re-presentations of non-target items. Although both avoidance tasks resulted in significant forgetting effects, greater memory impairments were observed for target items following competitive retrieval practice of non-target items. This finding was consistent with predictions from inhibition theory, and suggests that different avoidance activities may recruit different forgetting mechanisms. Finally, Experiments 2 and 3 examined the relationship between individual differences in repressive coping style and forgetting effects produced by the dropout procedure. Participants assessed to be repressive copers were more likely to forget negative target items, but only under conditions where avoidance tasks involved competitive retrieval practice. This finding was consistent with previous research demonstrating enhanced memory control abilities among repressive copers. Advisors/Committee Members: Smith, Steven M (advisor), Geraci, Lisa (committee member), Barnhardt, Terrence M. (committee member), Tassinary, Louis G. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Memory Blocking; Memory Recovery

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Handy, J. D. (2015). The Continued March Towards Ecological Validity in Laboratory Studies of Blocked and Recovered Memories. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155158

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Handy, Justin Dean. “The Continued March Towards Ecological Validity in Laboratory Studies of Blocked and Recovered Memories.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155158.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Handy, Justin Dean. “The Continued March Towards Ecological Validity in Laboratory Studies of Blocked and Recovered Memories.” 2015. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Handy JD. The Continued March Towards Ecological Validity in Laboratory Studies of Blocked and Recovered Memories. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155158.

Council of Science Editors:

Handy JD. The Continued March Towards Ecological Validity in Laboratory Studies of Blocked and Recovered Memories. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155158


Texas A&M University

2. Miller, Tyler. Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2012, Texas A&M University

Metacognition is defined as a person's awareness of the capabilities and vulnerabilities of their own cognition and also encompasses the actions that a person takes as a result of that awareness. The awareness and actions that a person takes are known as monitoring and control respectively. The relationship between accurate monitoring and improved control and performance has been borne out in multiple research studies. Unfortunately, people's metacognitive judgments are far from perfect; for low performers, that inaccuracy is most often in the form of overconfidence. Attempts to improve metacognitive monitoring and control have led to mixed results. The purpose of the experiments here was to examine whether participants could use confidence in their predictions to recalibrate subsequent performance predictions and to determine if improved metacognitive monitoring would confer benefits to metacognitive control. Would participants become less overconfident and would they then decide to study longer to improve performance? In three experiments, participants made predictions about their upcoming memory performance and reported their confidence that their predictions were accurate. Participants then adjusted their predictions so that they could be more confident the prediction was accurate. Experiment 1 served as a proof of concept ? it established that confidence judgments could be used to improve metacognitive monitoring accuracy. Experiment 2 explored the boundary conditions of the calibration improvement effect. The results revealed that continuous improvement in performance predictions was possible after reporting confidence. And finally, Experiment 3 showed that participants' improved monitoring accuracy did not influence metacognitive control, which in this study was allocation of study time. One possible reason why reporting confidence did not affect metacognitive control was that participants required feedback about the benefits of confidence judgments before the improved calibration effect would influence their decisions to allocate study time. Future research will examine the influence of reporting confidence and other interventions to improve calibration and performance. Advisors/Committee Members: Geraci, Lisa (advisor), Barnhardt, Terrence M. (committee member), Smith, Steven M. (committee member), Tassinary, Louis G. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Metacognition; Confidence; Overconfidence

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Miller, T. (2012). Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-08-11610

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miller, Tyler. “Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-08-11610.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miller, Tyler. “Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control.” 2012. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Miller T. Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-08-11610.

Council of Science Editors:

Miller T. Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-08-11610

.