Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Anderson, Evan E."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Texas A&M University

1. Mai, Zhibin. On Design and Realization of New Generation Misson-critial Application Systems.

Degree: PhD, Computer Engineering, 2011, Texas A&M University

Mission-critical system typically refers to a project or system for which the success is vital to the mission of the underlying organization. The failure or delayed completion of the tasks in mission-critical systems may cause severe financial loss, even human casualties. For example, failure of an accurate and timely forecast of Hurricane Rita in September 2005 caused enormous financial loss and several deaths. As such, real-time guarantee and reliability have always been two key foci of mission-critical system design. Many factors affect real-time guarantee and reliability. From the software design perspective, which is the focus of this paper, three aspects are most important. The first of these is how to design a single application to effectively support real-time requirement and improve reliability, the second is how to integrate different applications in a cluster environment to guarantee real-time requirement and improve reliability, and the third is how to effectively coordinate distributed applications to support real-time requirements and improve reliability. Following these three aspects, this dissertation proposes and implements three novel methodologies: real-time component based single node application development, real-time workflow-based cluster application integration, and real-time distributed admission control. For ease of understanding, we introduce these three methodologies and implementations in three real-world mission-critical application systems: single node mission-critical system, cluster environment mission-critical system, and wide-area network mission-critical system. We study full-scale design and implementation of these mission-critical systems, more specifically: 1) For the single node system, we introduce a real-time component based application model, a novel design methodology, and based on the model and methodology, we implement a real-time component based Enterprise JavaBean (EJB) System. Through component based design, efficient resource management and scheduling, we show that our model and design methodology can effectively improve system reliability and guarantee real-time requirement. 2) For the system in a cluster environment, we introduce a new application model, a real-time workflow-based application integration methodology, and based on the model and methodology, we implement a data center management system for the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) project. We show that our methodology can greatly simplify the design of such a system and make it easier to meet deadline requirements, while improving system reliability through the reuse of fully tested legacy models. 3) For the system in a wide area network, we narrow our focus to a representative VoIP system and introduce a general distributed real-time VoIP system model, a novel system design methodology, and an implementation. We show that with our new model and architectural design mechanism, we can provide effective real-time requirement for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP). Advisors/Committee Members: Zhao, Wei (advisor), Lively, William (committee member), Liu, Jyh-Charn (committee member), Anderson, Evan E. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: mission-critical; real-time; component systems; data center systems; voice over IP systems

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mai, Z. (2011). On Design and Realization of New Generation Misson-critial Application Systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-8803

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mai, Zhibin. “On Design and Realization of New Generation Misson-critial Application Systems.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-8803.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mai, Zhibin. “On Design and Realization of New Generation Misson-critial Application Systems.” 2011. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Mai Z. On Design and Realization of New Generation Misson-critial Application Systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-8803.

Council of Science Editors:

Mai Z. On Design and Realization of New Generation Misson-critial Application Systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-8803


Texas A&M University

2. Shah, Saurin Bipin. Improvements in distribution of meteorological data using application layer multicast.

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2007, Texas A&M University

The Unidata Program Center is an organization working with the University Center for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in Colorado. It provides a broad variety of meteorological data, which is used by researchers in many real-world applications. This data is obtained from observation stations and distributed to various universities worldwide, using Unidata’s own Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, and software called the Local Data Manager (LDM). The existing solution for data distribution has many limitations, like high end-toend latency of data delivery, increased bandwidth usage at some nodes, poor scalability for future needs and manual intervention for adjusting to changes or faults in the network topology. Since the data is used in so many applications, the impact of these limitations is often substantial. This thesis removes these limitations by suggesting improvements in the IDD system and the LDM. We present new algorithms for constructing an application-layer data distribution network. This distribution network will form the basis of the improved LDM and the IDD system, and will remove most of the limitations given above. Finally, we perform simulations and show that our algorithms achieve better average end-to-end latency as compared to that of the existing solution. We also compare the performance of our algorithms with a randomized solution. We find that for smaller topologies (where the number of nodes in the system are less than 38) the randomized solution constructs efficient distribution networks. However, if the number of nodes in the system increases (more than 38), our solution constructs efficient distribution networks than the randomized solution. We also evaluate the performance of our algorithms as the number of nodes in the system increases and as the number of faults in the system increases. We find that even if the number of faults in the system increases, the average end-to-end latency decreases, thus showing that the distribution topology does not become inefficient. Advisors/Committee Members: Pike, Scott M. (advisor), Anderson, Evan E. (committee member), Bettati, Riccardo (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Multicast; Application Layer Multicast; Meteorological; Data distribution

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shah, S. B. (2007). Improvements in distribution of meteorological data using application layer multicast. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4798

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shah, Saurin Bipin. “Improvements in distribution of meteorological data using application layer multicast.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4798.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shah, Saurin Bipin. “Improvements in distribution of meteorological data using application layer multicast.” 2007. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Shah SB. Improvements in distribution of meteorological data using application layer multicast. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2007. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4798.

Council of Science Editors:

Shah SB. Improvements in distribution of meteorological data using application layer multicast. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4798


Texas A&M University

3. Brown, Houghton Gregory. Interpersonal traits and the technology acceptance model: applying the interpersonal circumplex model as a nomological net for understanding user perceptions within human-to-computer interaction.

Degree: PhD, Management Information Systems, 2009, Texas A&M University

This study examines the effects that individual personality traits have on technology acceptance. Previous research on technology acceptance focuses primarily on exogenous variables such as trustor’s perceptions, attitudes, computer anxiety, positive or negative affect, age, and experience. This research seeks to improve our understanding of technology acceptance by examining user interpersonal traits as the underpinnings of user perceptions of technology and disposition to trust. A general theory of personality, the interpersonal circumplex (IPC) model, is used here as a framework to explain IT-users’ computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety, and perceptions about- and trust in technology. The interpersonal circumplex model is well established and provides a strong foundation for understanding interaction styles and interpersonal trust. Based on the interpersonal circumplex model, I develop predictions about how various personality types will interact with technology acceptance model (TAM) related variables: that is, I predict how individuals with different interpersonal traits will rate the following: their computer selfefficacy, computer anxiety, and perceptions of an information system’s performance; the system’s trustworthiness, ease of use, usefulness; as well as the user’s behavioral intention to use the system in the future. In general, I hypothesize that a computer user’s blend of the primary interpersonal dimensions of Control and Affiliation influences his or her responses to computer usage related questions. In this study, student-participants completed an on-line assessment of their interpersonal dispositions, using the Circumplex Scales of Interpersonal Values (CSIV; Locke, 2000); subsequently the studentparticipants reported their perceptions of- and trust in a computer-based learning system that they used as part of their class. In particular, this research suggests that the Communality (Affiliation) dimension of personality, as measured by the CSIV, indicates particular and significant correlations to user’s computer anxiety, perceived system performance, perceived usefulness (of the technology), and behavioral intent to use (IT) in the future. The Interpersonal Circumplex demonstrates improved acuity in detecting personality differences that may impact the way users respond to, perceive, and evaluate technology. As a new tool for information systems research, the IPC shows potential to provide further insight into IS theory by building a bridge between interpersonal theory and technology acceptance models. Advisors/Committee Members: Anderson, Evan E. (advisor), Poole, M. Scott (advisor), Barry, Evelyn (committee member), Street, Richard L. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Interpersonal Circumplex Model; Technology Acceptance Model

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brown, H. G. (2009). Interpersonal traits and the technology acceptance model: applying the interpersonal circumplex model as a nomological net for understanding user perceptions within human-to-computer interaction. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-3016

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Houghton Gregory. “Interpersonal traits and the technology acceptance model: applying the interpersonal circumplex model as a nomological net for understanding user perceptions within human-to-computer interaction.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-3016.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Houghton Gregory. “Interpersonal traits and the technology acceptance model: applying the interpersonal circumplex model as a nomological net for understanding user perceptions within human-to-computer interaction.” 2009. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Brown HG. Interpersonal traits and the technology acceptance model: applying the interpersonal circumplex model as a nomological net for understanding user perceptions within human-to-computer interaction. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-3016.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown HG. Interpersonal traits and the technology acceptance model: applying the interpersonal circumplex model as a nomological net for understanding user perceptions within human-to-computer interaction. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-3016

.