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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Allen, Colin F."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Grimes, Jeffrey Scott. The impact of a noise stressor on capsaicin-induced primary and secondary hyperalgesia.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2004, Texas A&M University

In searching for new human pain models that more closely resemble clinical pain states, the capsaicin pain model has emerged as a viable model for both inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. A principal benefit of the capsaicin model is that it allows study of two different pain processes, primary and secondary hyperalgesia. Primary hyperalgesia is characterized by spontaneous pain and both heat and mechanical hyperalgesia. In addition, it is likely the result of activation and sensitization of both peripheral and central nociceptors. In contrast, secondary hyperalgesia is characterized by only mechanical hyperalgesia and is caused by the sensitization of central nociceptive neurons. Previous research utilizing the capsaicin pain model has primarily focused on the neural properties with little focus on the impact of affective states on capsaicin-related pain processes. The present study examined the impact of a noise stressor on both primary and secondary hyperalgesia. Results indicated that the effects of the noise stressor impacted secondary hyperalgesia, but not primary hyperalgesia. Advisors/Committee Members: Meagher, Mary W. (advisor), Allen, Colin F. (committee member), Grau, James W. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: pain; stress; emotion; capsaicin; hyperalgesia; human pain models; pain modulation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Grimes, J. S. (2004). The impact of a noise stressor on capsaicin-induced primary and secondary hyperalgesia. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/249

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Grimes, Jeffrey Scott. “The impact of a noise stressor on capsaicin-induced primary and secondary hyperalgesia.” 2004. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/249.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Grimes, Jeffrey Scott. “The impact of a noise stressor on capsaicin-induced primary and secondary hyperalgesia.” 2004. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Grimes JS. The impact of a noise stressor on capsaicin-induced primary and secondary hyperalgesia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2004. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/249.

Council of Science Editors:

Grimes JS. The impact of a noise stressor on capsaicin-induced primary and secondary hyperalgesia. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/249


Texas A&M University

2. Shriver, Adam Joseph. What's wrong with pain?.

Degree: MA, Philosophy, 2006, Texas A&M University

The experience of pain is something that most people are extremely familiar with. However, once we begin to examine the subject from an ethical point of view, and particularly when we examine so-called marginal cases such as nonhuman animals, we are quickly confronted with difficult questions. This thesis, through an examination of a particular feature of moral language and a description of recent research on pain, provides an analysis of how pain fits into ethical theory. It is argued that universalizability is an important feature of ethical systems and provides a basis for claiming that an agent is acting inconsistently if he or she evaluates similar situations differently. Though the additional features prescriptivity and overridingness provide an important connection between moral judgment and action in Hare’s two-level utilitarianism, it is argued that they ultimately lead to claims incompatible with lived moral experience. Arguments by Parfit and Sidgwick are discussed which tie acting morally to acting consistently, and it is concluded that selfinterest theory is not a tenable position. After the features of moral judgment are discussed, the necessary features of a moral subject are examined. It is concluded that sentience, or the ability to feel pleasure or pain, is a sufficient condition for being a moral subject. Arguments are examined that attempt to show which animals likely consciously experience pain. Difficulties for these arguments are discussed and an original argument is presented that at least partially addresses these difficulties. It is concluded that from an ethical perspective our current practices such as factory farming are probably not justified. It appears especially likely that our treatment of other mammals is unethical, but the answers are not as clear with other animals. However, all of the conclusions are tentative, as no doubt future scientific investigation will shed more light on our knowledge. Advisors/Committee Members: Varner, Gary E. (advisor), Allen, Colin F. (committee member), Grau, Jim W. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: animal cognition; animal pain; animal welfare

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shriver, A. J. (2006). What's wrong with pain?. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4285

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shriver, Adam Joseph. “What's wrong with pain?.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4285.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shriver, Adam Joseph. “What's wrong with pain?.” 2006. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Shriver AJ. What's wrong with pain?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4285.

Council of Science Editors:

Shriver AJ. What's wrong with pain?. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4285

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