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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Witham, Keith"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Randolph, Laura. Understanding Black Undergraduate Females' Sense of Belonging at a Predominantly White Institution.

Degree: 2017, Temple University

Educational Leadership

Ed.D.

As college and university continue to recruit and enroll more diverse student populations and maintain institutional priorities of diversity and inclusion, it is imperative we understand the distinct experiences of our minority populations. This research will specifically focus on the experiences of Black undergraduate females. To ensure the success of our Black females students, it is imperative we understand their need for a sense of belonging on a predominantly White campus in order to achieve higher-level opportunities of classroom and campus success. Sense of belonging is defined as the ability to connect, feel validated, accepted, and matter. This understanding is key to Black undergraduate females’ ability to successfully integrate academically and socially in their college environment. Existing research provides insight into the Black male experience, not limited to the challenges Black males face, as well as variables needed to enable Black males’ educational success. However, there is a general lack of awareness and attention to the nuanced experiences of our Black female students on predominantly White campuses. What challenges do Black females face and what factors can enable their educational success? This missed opportunity of understanding of their experiences limits faculty, staff, and administrators from creating an environment where Black females can succeed both inside and outside the classroom. This research gives voice to the experiences of this seemingly silent minority and challenges campus environments to address their operating norm of campus rituals and culture. The purpose of this qualitative study is to examine the experiences of nine Black undergraduate females at one predominantly White urban institution located in the North East. Through the use semi-structured interviews, this study seeks to understand in what ways Black female students’ understanding of self, relationship development, and engagement with their campus environment aids in the creation of their sense of belonging to their institution. Findings from this study demonstrate key components of belonging are rooted in understanding of self, and self in relation to others; the impact of participating in institutional programs; and the ability to navigate rules of engagement, both in the classroom and social environments. Participants demonstrate varying levels of belonging but provide key insight for higher education administrators to reflect upon their institutional programs, services, and opportunities to provide intentional space and place of support and ultimately find a place where they matter; their place of belonging.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Davis, James Earl;, Schifter, Catherine, Witham, Keith, Brooks, Wanda M.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Higher education administration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Randolph, L. (2017). Understanding Black Undergraduate Females' Sense of Belonging at a Predominantly White Institution. (Thesis). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,442767

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Randolph, Laura. “Understanding Black Undergraduate Females' Sense of Belonging at a Predominantly White Institution.” 2017. Thesis, Temple University. Accessed June 19, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,442767.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Randolph, Laura. “Understanding Black Undergraduate Females' Sense of Belonging at a Predominantly White Institution.” 2017. Web. 19 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Randolph L. Understanding Black Undergraduate Females' Sense of Belonging at a Predominantly White Institution. [Internet] [Thesis]. Temple University; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 19]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,442767.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Randolph L. Understanding Black Undergraduate Females' Sense of Belonging at a Predominantly White Institution. [Thesis]. Temple University; 2017. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,442767

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Temple University

2. Moore, Janice R. The Impact of Retention Programming on At-risk First-year Students in a Private, Proprietary College.

Degree: 2015, Temple University

Educational Leadership

Ed.D.

Institutions continually try to balance the access/retention/success pendulum by accepting students on a contingent or probationary basis and enrolling them in student success or support programs. These programs are offered to help colleges increase enrollment while at the same time supporting fair and equitable access policies. The two primary purposes for conducting this study are to determine what variables have the greatest impact upon student persistence or student attrition and to evaluate the effectiveness of a retention program designed to assist at-risk students. The barriers that have the largest impact upon student persistence or attrition are explored. The extent to which performance in developmental English impacts persistence and attrition are examined as well as the effectiveness of a retention program specifically designed to assist students accepted contingently to college. The goal of this study examines how one institution's retention program was interpreted and experienced by students and what impact it had upon those students' persistence and overall college success. This study further examines the necessity for institutions to assess established policies and processes as inadvertent barriers to success. According to Laskey and Hetzel, 41 percent of entering community college students, and 29 percent of all entering college students are under prepared in at least one of the basic skills.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: DuCette, Joseph P.;, Davis, James Earl, Schifter, Catherine, Witham, Keith, Farley, Frank;.

Subjects/Keywords: Educational evaluation; Educational administration; Educational leadership;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moore, J. R. (2015). The Impact of Retention Programming on At-risk First-year Students in a Private, Proprietary College. (Thesis). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,322138

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moore, Janice R. “The Impact of Retention Programming on At-risk First-year Students in a Private, Proprietary College.” 2015. Thesis, Temple University. Accessed June 19, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,322138.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moore, Janice R. “The Impact of Retention Programming on At-risk First-year Students in a Private, Proprietary College.” 2015. Web. 19 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Moore JR. The Impact of Retention Programming on At-risk First-year Students in a Private, Proprietary College. [Internet] [Thesis]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 19]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,322138.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Moore JR. The Impact of Retention Programming on At-risk First-year Students in a Private, Proprietary College. [Thesis]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,322138

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Temple University

3. Schwartz, Mark Scott. Risk Modeling of First Year Student Retention at a Community College: An Early Exploration of Data, Feasibility, and Application.

Degree: 2016, Temple University

Educational Leadership

Ed.D.

Set in a medium sized, suburban, two-year community college, this study explores the initial development of an actionable predictive risk model for first-year retention based on data currently collected and to identify target variables upon which data should be collected to improve future versions of the model. Institutional data were analyzed by means of Analysis of Variance and logistic regression and ordinary least squares regression analyses. Results suggested there are several important variables for which data as available but the risk model as developed has relatively low predictive power. The results of this study are used to inform College administrators, faculty, and staff about risk modeling, conclusions that can be drawn from existing data, and provide guidance on additional relevant variables upon which data should be collected. Additionally, recommendations for future research are discussed for this study’s institution and the field of education as it relates to Community Colleges.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: DuCette, Joseph P., Davis, James Earl;, DuCette, Joseph P., Davis, James Earl, Witham, Keith, Carter, Virginia;.

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Educational administration; Educational leadership;

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schwartz, M. S. (2016). Risk Modeling of First Year Student Retention at a Community College: An Early Exploration of Data, Feasibility, and Application. (Thesis). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,418735

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schwartz, Mark Scott. “Risk Modeling of First Year Student Retention at a Community College: An Early Exploration of Data, Feasibility, and Application.” 2016. Thesis, Temple University. Accessed June 19, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,418735.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schwartz, Mark Scott. “Risk Modeling of First Year Student Retention at a Community College: An Early Exploration of Data, Feasibility, and Application.” 2016. Web. 19 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Schwartz MS. Risk Modeling of First Year Student Retention at a Community College: An Early Exploration of Data, Feasibility, and Application. [Internet] [Thesis]. Temple University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 19]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,418735.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Schwartz MS. Risk Modeling of First Year Student Retention at a Community College: An Early Exploration of Data, Feasibility, and Application. [Thesis]. Temple University; 2016. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,418735

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.