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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Willis, Martin"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Abe, Mariko. Syntactic variation across proficiency levels in Japanese EFL learner speech.

Degree: 2015, Temple University

Teaching & Learning

Ed.D.

Overall patterns of language use variation across oral proficiency levels of 1,243 Japanese EFL learners and 20 native speakers of English using the linguistic features set from Biber (1988) were investigated in this study. The approach combined learner corpora, language processing techniques, visual inspection of descriptive statistics, and multivariate statistical analysis to identify characteristics of learner language use. The largest spoken learner corpus in Japan, the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology Japanese Learner English (NICT JLE) Corpus was used for the analysis. It consists of over one million running words of L2 spoken English with oral proficiency level information. The level of the material in the corpus is approximately equal to a Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) range of 356 to 921. It also includes data gathered from 20 native speakers who performed identical speaking tasks as the learners. The 58 linguistic features (e.g., grammatical features) were taken from the original list of 67 linguistic features in Biber (1988) to explore the variation of learner language. The following research questions were addressed. First, what linguistic features characterize different oral proficiency levels? Second, to what degree do the language features appearing in the spoken production of high proficiency learners match those of native speakers who perform the same task? Third, is the oral production of Japanese EFL learners rich enough to display the full range of features used by Biber? Grammatical features alone would not be enough to comprehensively distinguish oral proficiency levels, but the results of the study show that various types of grammatical features can be used to describe differences in the levels. First, frequency change patterns (i.e., a rising, a falling, a combination of rising, falling, and a plateauing) across the oral proficiency levels were shown through linguistic features from a wide range of categories: (a) part-of-speech (noun, pronoun it, first person pronoun, demonstrative pronoun, indefinite pronoun, possibility modal, adverb, causative adverb), (b) stance markers (emphatic, hedge, amplifier), (c) reduced forms (contraction, stranded preposition), (d) specialized verb class (private verb), complementation (infinitive), (e) coordination (phrasal coordination), (f) passive (agentless passive), and (g) possibly tense and aspect markers (past tense, perfect aspect). In addition, there is a noticeable gap between native and non-native speakers of English. There are six items that native speakers of English use more frequently than the most advanced learners (perfect aspect, place adverb, pronoun it, stranded preposition, synthetic negation, emphatic) and five items that native speakers use less frequently (past tense, first person pronoun, infinitive, possibility modal, analytic negation). Other linguistic features are used with similar frequency across the levels. What is clear is that the speaking…

Advisors/Committee Members: Nation, Paul, Beglar, David;, Willis, Martin, Tono, Yukio, Visgatis, Brad;.

Subjects/Keywords: Foreign language education; Linguistics;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abe, M. (2015). Syntactic variation across proficiency levels in Japanese EFL learner speech. (Thesis). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,350754

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abe, Mariko. “Syntactic variation across proficiency levels in Japanese EFL learner speech.” 2015. Thesis, Temple University. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,350754.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abe, Mariko. “Syntactic variation across proficiency levels in Japanese EFL learner speech.” 2015. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Abe M. Syntactic variation across proficiency levels in Japanese EFL learner speech. [Internet] [Thesis]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,350754.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Abe M. Syntactic variation across proficiency levels in Japanese EFL learner speech. [Thesis]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,350754

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Temple University

2. Robson, Graham George. A MODEL OF SITUATIONAL CONSTRUCTS ACCOUNTING FOR WILLINGNESS TO COMMUNICATE AT A JAPANESE UNIVERSITY.

Degree: 2015, Temple University

Language Arts

Ed.D.

Many researchers have highlighted the need for students to have a willingness to communicate (WTC) in second and foreign language classrooms. WTC is important because it is believed that WTC leads to eventual communication both inside and outside the classroom. Previous research into WTC has centered mainly on the use of structural models and trait, self-reported measurements of WTC, but recent research has shown that WTC is also heavily dependent on the situation. However, very few studies recognize this and have, thus, not employed situational measurements of WTC. After a thorough review of WTC literature, 13 pertinent constructs were modified to reflect the situation in the foreign language classroom. These were related to constructs of the classroom, beliefs about communication; self-determined motivation; self-perceived competence; communication anxiety and willingness to communicate. A preliminary study employing exploratory factor analysis and Rasch analysis, followed by a main study conducted with and confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis were undertaken with first- and second-year Japanese university students. The factor analysis was used to investigate the underlying structures of the factors and the Rasch analysis was used to determine fit, category functioning and dimensionality. Nine reliable and unidimensional factors were brought forward from the main study, which were Classroom Efficacy Factor and Classroom Affective Factor as the two classroom factors; Intrinsic Motivation for Communication, Introjected Regulation for Communication and External Regulation for Communication as the three self-determined motivation constructs, and finally, Self-Perceived Competence, Communicative Anxiety and Willingness to Communicate split in two subconstructs of pair/work and whole class activities. The second half the study was the formulation of a structural equation model using the above constructs to predict situational WTC. The model also included an often under-utilized resource, the teacher, who assessed the learners’ actual communication to identify if WTC leads to language use. All the fit indices in the final model (N = 376) were good, and the model included three additional paths. The model indicated that classroom constructs led to motivation and self-perceived competence, which predicted confidence. Motivation led directly to WTC and indirectly to WTC through confidence. Lastly, WTC predicted actual communication. The constructs in this study can be applied in other studies of situational WTC. This study helps to both expand our understanding of constructs affecting situational WTC and actual communication, and provides more validity to the construct of situational WTC. It also reaffirms the importance of what happens in the classroom, which is main arena for communication in the EFL setting.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Elwood, James Andrew;, Beglar, David, In’nami, Yo, Willis, Martin, Nemoto, Tomoko;.

Subjects/Keywords: Foreign language education;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Robson, G. G. (2015). A MODEL OF SITUATIONAL CONSTRUCTS ACCOUNTING FOR WILLINGNESS TO COMMUNICATE AT A JAPANESE UNIVERSITY. (Thesis). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,362956

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Robson, Graham George. “A MODEL OF SITUATIONAL CONSTRUCTS ACCOUNTING FOR WILLINGNESS TO COMMUNICATE AT A JAPANESE UNIVERSITY.” 2015. Thesis, Temple University. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,362956.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Robson, Graham George. “A MODEL OF SITUATIONAL CONSTRUCTS ACCOUNTING FOR WILLINGNESS TO COMMUNICATE AT A JAPANESE UNIVERSITY.” 2015. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Robson GG. A MODEL OF SITUATIONAL CONSTRUCTS ACCOUNTING FOR WILLINGNESS TO COMMUNICATE AT A JAPANESE UNIVERSITY. [Internet] [Thesis]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,362956.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Robson GG. A MODEL OF SITUATIONAL CONSTRUCTS ACCOUNTING FOR WILLINGNESS TO COMMUNICATE AT A JAPANESE UNIVERSITY. [Thesis]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,362956

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Temple University

3. Matikainen, Tiina Johanna. Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students.

Degree: 2011, Temple University

CITE/Language Arts

Ed.D.

In a series of studies using semantic relatedness judgment response times, Jiang (2000, 2002, 2004a) has claimed that L2 lexical entries fossilize with their equivalent L1 content or something very close to it. In another study using a more productive test of lexical knowledge (Jiang 2004b), however, the evidence for this conclusion was less clear. The present study is a partial replication of Jiang (2004b) with Japanese learners of English. The aims of the study are to investigate the influence of the first language (L1) on second language (L2) lexical knowledge, to investigate whether lexical knowledge displays frequency-related, emergent properties, and to investigate the influence of the L1 on the acquisition of L2 word pairs that have a common L1 equivalent. Data from a sentence completion task was completed by 244 participants, who were shown sentence contexts in which they chose between L2 word pairs sharing a common equivalent in the students' first language, Japanese. The data were analyzed using the statistical analyses available in the programming environment R to quantify the participants' ability to discriminate between synonymous and non-synonymous use of these L2 word pairs. The results showed a strong bias against synonymy for all word pairs; the participants tended to make a distinction between the two synonymous items by assigning each word a distinct meaning. With the non-synonymous items, lemma frequency was closely related to the participants' success in choosing the correct word in the word pair. In addition, lemma frequency and the degree of similarity between the words in the word pair were closely related to the participants' overall knowledge of the non-synonymous meanings of the vocabulary items. The results suggest that the participants had a stronger preference for non-synonymous options than for the synonymous option. This suggests that the learners might have adopted a one-word, one-meaning learning strategy (Willis, 1998). The reasonably strong relationship between several of the usage-based statistics and the item measures from R suggest that with exposure learners are better able to use words in ways that are similar to native speakers of English, to differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate contexts and to recognize the boundary separating semantic overlap and semantic uniqueness. Lexical similarity appears to play a secondary role, in combination with frequency, in learners' ability to differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate contexts when using L2 word pairs that have a single translation in the L1.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Beglar, David, Childs, Marshall, Willis, Martin, Nation, I. S. P., Webb, Stuart Alexander.

Subjects/Keywords: Language; Linguistics; L2 lexical knowledge; lexical similarity; semantic relatedness; usage-based statistics; word frequency

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Matikainen, T. J. (2011). Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students. (Thesis). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,133319

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Matikainen, Tiina Johanna. “Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students.” 2011. Thesis, Temple University. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,133319.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Matikainen, Tiina Johanna. “Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students.” 2011. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Matikainen TJ. Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students. [Internet] [Thesis]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,133319.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Matikainen TJ. Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students. [Thesis]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,133319

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.