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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Webb, Stuart Alexander"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Matsumura, Yuko. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE LEXICAL INFERENCING OF JAPANESE EFL LEARNERS.

Degree: 2010, Temple University

CITE/Language Arts

Ed.D.

Although studies of lexical inferencing indicate that second language learners frequently encounter difficulties inferring lexical meaning from context, lexical inferencing, or deriving lexical meaning from contextual analysis, constitutes an essential part of reading comprehension. Two main purposes motivated the current study. The first purpose was to investigate how 139 Japanese EFL learners performed in lexical inferencing tasks and the second purpose concerned to what degree their linguistic and extralinguistic knowledge sources were related to lexical inferencing and which knowledge sources contributed to successful lexical inferencing. Linguistic knowledge sources were categorized into lexical knowledge (recognition vocabulary and collocation), syntactic knowledge (syntactic property of words and sentence-level grammar), and discourse knowledge of cohesion and coherence (conjunction, pronoun reference, and discourse prediction). Extralinguistic knowledge sources concern background knowledge related to the topic of texts. The participants were relatively successful at the lexical inferencing tasks for two reasons. First, the lexical density of the texts was controlled so that almost all of the non-target words were at the 2,000 word frequency level, a comprehensible level for the participants in this study. Second, the data were analyzed in a way that gave the participants credit for acquiring partial knowledge of the semantic features of the target words. All the knowledge sources were significantly correlated with lexical inferencing, and a hierarchical multiple regression identified the three best predictors of lexical inferencing. Discourse prediction was the best predictor of lexical inferencing due to the similarities of the cognitive processes of bridging information gaps through scrutinizing textbase input. The second best predictor was written receptive vocabulary size, the most fundamental component of deriving meaning in a text. It was followed by text-related background knowledge. Other significant, but minor predictors were knowledge of the part-of-speech of words and syntax, both of which are constituents of sentence-level processing. Collocational knowledge and knowledge associated with discourse-processing constituents were not significant predictors of lexical inferencing. To summarize, three semantically oriented knowledge sources, i.e., discourse prediction, recognition vocabulary, background knowledge, were more important predictors of lexical inferencing than structurally oriented knowledge sources such as part-of-speech and syntax.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Beglar, David, Nation, I. S. P., Webb, Stuart Alexander, Daulton, Frank E., Kozaki, Yoko.

Subjects/Keywords: Education, Curriculum and Instruction; English as a Second Language; EFL learners; lexical inferencing; reading; vocabulary

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Matsumura, Y. (2010). FACTORS INFLUENCING THE LEXICAL INFERENCING OF JAPANESE EFL LEARNERS. (Thesis). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,99794

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Matsumura, Yuko. “FACTORS INFLUENCING THE LEXICAL INFERENCING OF JAPANESE EFL LEARNERS.” 2010. Thesis, Temple University. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,99794.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Matsumura, Yuko. “FACTORS INFLUENCING THE LEXICAL INFERENCING OF JAPANESE EFL LEARNERS.” 2010. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Matsumura Y. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE LEXICAL INFERENCING OF JAPANESE EFL LEARNERS. [Internet] [Thesis]. Temple University; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,99794.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Matsumura Y. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE LEXICAL INFERENCING OF JAPANESE EFL LEARNERS. [Thesis]. Temple University; 2010. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,99794

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Temple University

2. Matikainen, Tiina Johanna. Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students.

Degree: 2011, Temple University

CITE/Language Arts

Ed.D.

In a series of studies using semantic relatedness judgment response times, Jiang (2000, 2002, 2004a) has claimed that L2 lexical entries fossilize with their equivalent L1 content or something very close to it. In another study using a more productive test of lexical knowledge (Jiang 2004b), however, the evidence for this conclusion was less clear. The present study is a partial replication of Jiang (2004b) with Japanese learners of English. The aims of the study are to investigate the influence of the first language (L1) on second language (L2) lexical knowledge, to investigate whether lexical knowledge displays frequency-related, emergent properties, and to investigate the influence of the L1 on the acquisition of L2 word pairs that have a common L1 equivalent. Data from a sentence completion task was completed by 244 participants, who were shown sentence contexts in which they chose between L2 word pairs sharing a common equivalent in the students' first language, Japanese. The data were analyzed using the statistical analyses available in the programming environment R to quantify the participants' ability to discriminate between synonymous and non-synonymous use of these L2 word pairs. The results showed a strong bias against synonymy for all word pairs; the participants tended to make a distinction between the two synonymous items by assigning each word a distinct meaning. With the non-synonymous items, lemma frequency was closely related to the participants' success in choosing the correct word in the word pair. In addition, lemma frequency and the degree of similarity between the words in the word pair were closely related to the participants' overall knowledge of the non-synonymous meanings of the vocabulary items. The results suggest that the participants had a stronger preference for non-synonymous options than for the synonymous option. This suggests that the learners might have adopted a one-word, one-meaning learning strategy (Willis, 1998). The reasonably strong relationship between several of the usage-based statistics and the item measures from R suggest that with exposure learners are better able to use words in ways that are similar to native speakers of English, to differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate contexts and to recognize the boundary separating semantic overlap and semantic uniqueness. Lexical similarity appears to play a secondary role, in combination with frequency, in learners' ability to differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate contexts when using L2 word pairs that have a single translation in the L1.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Beglar, David, Childs, Marshall, Willis, Martin, Nation, I. S. P., Webb, Stuart Alexander.

Subjects/Keywords: Language; Linguistics; L2 lexical knowledge; lexical similarity; semantic relatedness; usage-based statistics; word frequency

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Matikainen, T. J. (2011). Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students. (Thesis). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,133319

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Matikainen, Tiina Johanna. “Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students.” 2011. Thesis, Temple University. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,133319.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Matikainen, Tiina Johanna. “Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students.” 2011. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Matikainen TJ. Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students. [Internet] [Thesis]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,133319.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Matikainen TJ. Semantic Representation of L2 Lexicon in Japanese University Students. [Thesis]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,133319

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Temple University

3. Ogawa, Kyoko. EFL learner autonomy and unfamiliar vocabulary learning.

Degree: 2012, Temple University

CITE/Language Arts

Ed.D.

The notion of learner autonomy is one of the major theoretical constructs studied in L2 learning. Drawing on Deci and Ryan's (1985) Self-Determination Theory (SDT), I sought to investigate and describe L2 learner autonomy and how an educational intervention influences it. The SDT conceptualizing human motivation for learning as existing on a continuum from extrinsic to intrinsic motivation provides ways of measuring learner autonomy and a rationale for educational interventions for developing it. First, Japanese adult EFL learners' characteristics were described in terms of learner autonomy-related psychological constructs (motivation, affect, and strategy use) according to levels of learner autonomy based on SDT. Second, the adapted VSS yielded significant effects on the participants' vocabulary learning and L2 learning anxiety (for the high and low autonomous motivation groups) and social strategy use (for the low autonomous motivation group). Third, the implementation of the adapted VSS into the adult L2 English classes was considered in terms of the development of linguistic and autonomous forms of learning quoting from the participants' quantitative and qualitative responses for this approach.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Beglar, David, Nation, I. S. P., Webb, Stuart Alexander, Daulton, Frank E., Swenson, Tamara;.

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Language; autonomy; EFL; Rasch Rating Scale; Self Determination Theory; vocabulary learning; Vocabulary Self-Collection

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ogawa, K. (2012). EFL learner autonomy and unfamiliar vocabulary learning. (Thesis). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,174127

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ogawa, Kyoko. “EFL learner autonomy and unfamiliar vocabulary learning.” 2012. Thesis, Temple University. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,174127.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ogawa, Kyoko. “EFL learner autonomy and unfamiliar vocabulary learning.” 2012. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Ogawa K. EFL learner autonomy and unfamiliar vocabulary learning. [Internet] [Thesis]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,174127.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ogawa K. EFL learner autonomy and unfamiliar vocabulary learning. [Thesis]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,174127

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.