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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Udo-Inyang, Philip D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Cetin, Mehmet. PAVEMENT DESIGN WITH POROUS ASPHALT.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Temple University

Civil Engineering

In this research study, a strategy was used for assigning stiffness values to various layers of the pavement system so that there are negligible tensile stresses in the subgrade and base layers. The stiffnesses of the aggregate base layers were assigned double the values of the corresponding subgrade materials. The layer thicknesses were designed to achieve surface deflection values within the acceptable limit. An innovative design procedure was developed for designing pavement sections covering various layer thicknesses, material and environmental variables. The designed sections were compared with the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) procedure and the differences were critiqued. Porous asphalt layer was used as the surface course for all pavement sections. The calculations validated the general principle of pavement design, as the subgrade stiffness decreased the base thickness increased for the same surface course thickness and traffic. Structural design of 63 pavements sections was accomplished representing various temperature and materials including additives. Low Density Polyethylene, performance graded asphalt, different soils, aggregates, lime and cement were the component materials utilized in this research study. An explanation on the mechanics of the mixtures is given in the results and discussion section.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Brooks, Robert M., Udo-Inyang, Philip D., Udoeyo, Felix F., Diloyan, Oleksandr, Guo, Yuhong;.

Subjects/Keywords: Engineering; Civil engineering;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cetin, M. (2013). PAVEMENT DESIGN WITH POROUS ASPHALT. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,224799

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cetin, Mehmet. “PAVEMENT DESIGN WITH POROUS ASPHALT.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed October 29, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,224799.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cetin, Mehmet. “PAVEMENT DESIGN WITH POROUS ASPHALT.” 2013. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Cetin M. PAVEMENT DESIGN WITH POROUS ASPHALT. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,224799.

Council of Science Editors:

Cetin M. PAVEMENT DESIGN WITH POROUS ASPHALT. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,224799


Temple University

2. Switala-Elmhurst, Katherine. Life Cycle Assessment of Residential Windows: Analyzing the Environmental Impact of Window Restoration versus Window Replacement.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Civil Engineering

New windows are rated based on their energy performance during the use phase. This rating neglects the overall environmental impact caused by raw material extraction, manufacturing, maintenance and disposal. Due to the number of residential window replacements occurring today in the United States, there is a growing need to quantify the sustainability of window preservation as an alternative to window replacement. This study assessed the environmental impact of historic wood window restoration versus window replacement for the entire "cradle to grave" life cycle of the window assembly. This study focused on a typical, mid-twentieth century housing development in the Northeast United States using four window configurations as follows: 1. Restored original wood window with a new exterior aluminum storm window; 2. PVC replacement window; 3. Aluminum-clad wood replacement window; 4. Wood replacement window. The dissertation assessed the life cycle of window configurations using GaBi Software. The life cycle inventories were analyzed using the TRACI 2.1 impact method which translated the environmental consequences of the life cycle assessment processes into quantifiable environmental impacts. The dissertation also considered window thermal performance and life cycle costs. When considering life cycle environmental impacts, thermal performance, energy savings and material costs, the results indicated that wood window restoration was the best option when compared to replacement windows considered in this study; however, the results indicated that building service life and window service life assumptions could impact results. Thermal performance testing of windows revealed that window restoration techniques undertaken in this study improved the window's overall thermal performance. The testing also indicated that the effects of air infiltration had minimal influence on the performance of the restored window assembly when compared to a high performance replacement window. The results of the energy model exhibited only a small annual energy savings between the restored window assembly and a high performance replacement window. The payback cost analysis revealed that, while there was an immediate financial benefit of window replacement with the PVC option, window replacement frequency and overall life cycle environmental impacts would favor the restored window option.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Udo-Inyang, Philip D.;, Neretina, Svetlana, Serrano, Sergio, Henry, Michael, Flamm, Bradley, Van Aken, Benoit;.

Subjects/Keywords: Civil engineering;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Switala-Elmhurst, K. (2014). Life Cycle Assessment of Residential Windows: Analyzing the Environmental Impact of Window Restoration versus Window Replacement. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,275743

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Switala-Elmhurst, Katherine. “Life Cycle Assessment of Residential Windows: Analyzing the Environmental Impact of Window Restoration versus Window Replacement.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed October 29, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,275743.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Switala-Elmhurst, Katherine. “Life Cycle Assessment of Residential Windows: Analyzing the Environmental Impact of Window Restoration versus Window Replacement.” 2014. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Switala-Elmhurst K. Life Cycle Assessment of Residential Windows: Analyzing the Environmental Impact of Window Restoration versus Window Replacement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,275743.

Council of Science Editors:

Switala-Elmhurst K. Life Cycle Assessment of Residential Windows: Analyzing the Environmental Impact of Window Restoration versus Window Replacement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,275743


Temple University

3. Zhang, Wei. LONGITUDINAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN OPEN-CHANNEL FLOW - A Numerical Simulation Study on Longitudinal Dispersion, Surface Storage Effects, Transverse Mixing, Uncertainties and Parameter-Transferring Problems.

Degree: PhD, 2011, Temple University

Civil Engineering

The longitudinal solute transport modeling is critical in river and stream water quality management, control, and the mitigation of hazardous riverine spills. One of the widely used "deadzone" model is the transient storage model (TSM). TSM is a significant improvement over the advection-dispersion model (ADM), but it cannot simulate the breakthrough curve (BTC) immediately after a large pool. Additionally, the calibration (parameterization) method is challenged by the non-identifiability which is common to all inverse modeling, and it seems TSM cannot be easily used as a predictive tool, more of an interpretive tool of solute transport, i.e., is the parameter set calibrated via inverse modeling transferable? Pools are fundamental stream morphology unit in streams with mixed bed materials in pool-riffle or pool-step sequences. Understanding of how a pool impacts the longitudinal solute transport is the first step towards improving current model such as TSM or developing new models. By introducing a dimensionless group, e= Q/(Dt W) (where, Q is the average volumetric flow rate; Dt is an average transverse dispersion coefficient; W is the channel flow width), derived from non-dimensionalization of the governing equations of one of the most rigorous 2-dimansional (2D) (depth-averaged) model, Mike21, this work presents an alternative way of longitudinal solute transport investigation. Using the 2D fully hydrodynamic Mike21, numerical experiments were conducted on hypothetical streams in this dissertation. Simulation study on hypothetical stream with pool reveals that a pool's effects on longitudinal solute transport are manifested by three aspects: boosting longitudinal spreading (concentration peak attenuation), causing a solute plume delay and increasing solute residence time. These effects fade like a "wake" as the solute plume moves downstream. e provides an insight into the physics of longitudinal transport; it outlines a relative transverse mixing intensity of a stream. The internal transport and mixing condition (including the secondary circulations) in a pool together with the pool's dimensions determine the pool's storage effects especially when e >>1. The BTCs downstream from a pool may be "heavy tailed" (i.e., have enormously slow decaying rate) which cannot be modeled by the TSM. Results also suggest that the falling limb of a BTC more accurately characterizes the pool's storage effects because the corresponding solute has more chance to sample the entire storage area. n a more fundamental perspective, the predictive ability of inverse modeling parameterized model is discussed and conclusion is made about the role of a stream/river system's nonlinearity in determining the predictability; a misleading mis-nomenclature in TSM application is also demonstrated with a numerical experiment.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Boufadel, Michel C., Kargbo, David M., Khoury, Naji N. (Naji Najib), Ryan, Robert, Suri, Rominder P.S., Udo-Inyang, Philip D., Darvish, Kurosh.

Subjects/Keywords: Civil Engineering; Environmental Engineering; longitudinal dispersion; numerical simulation; open channel flow; parameter-transferring; solute transport; surface storage

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, W. (2011). LONGITUDINAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN OPEN-CHANNEL FLOW - A Numerical Simulation Study on Longitudinal Dispersion, Surface Storage Effects, Transverse Mixing, Uncertainties and Parameter-Transferring Problems. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,139476

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Wei. “LONGITUDINAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN OPEN-CHANNEL FLOW - A Numerical Simulation Study on Longitudinal Dispersion, Surface Storage Effects, Transverse Mixing, Uncertainties and Parameter-Transferring Problems.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed October 29, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,139476.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Wei. “LONGITUDINAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN OPEN-CHANNEL FLOW - A Numerical Simulation Study on Longitudinal Dispersion, Surface Storage Effects, Transverse Mixing, Uncertainties and Parameter-Transferring Problems.” 2011. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Zhang W. LONGITUDINAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN OPEN-CHANNEL FLOW - A Numerical Simulation Study on Longitudinal Dispersion, Surface Storage Effects, Transverse Mixing, Uncertainties and Parameter-Transferring Problems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,139476.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang W. LONGITUDINAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN OPEN-CHANNEL FLOW - A Numerical Simulation Study on Longitudinal Dispersion, Surface Storage Effects, Transverse Mixing, Uncertainties and Parameter-Transferring Problems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,139476

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