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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Tehrani, Rouzbeh Afsarmanesh;"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Sahlabadi, Mohammad. A NOVEL BIOINSPIRED DESIGN FOR SURGICAL NEEDLES TO REDUCE TISSUE DAMAGE IN INTERVENTIONAL PROCEDURES.

Degree: PhD, 2018, Temple University

Mechanical Engineering

The needle-based procedures are usually considered minimally invasive. However, in insertion into soft tissues such as brain and liver, the tissue damage caused by needle insertion can be very significant. From the literature, it has been known that reduction in needle insertion and extraction forces as well as tissue deformation during the insertion results in less invasive procedure. This work aims to design and develop a new bioinspired design for surgical needles which reduce the insertion and extraction forces of the needle, and its damage to the tissue. Barbs in honeybee stinger decrease its insertion force significantly. Inspired by that finding, a new honeybee-inspired needle was designed and developed, and its insertion mechanics was studied. To study the insertion mechanics of honeybee-inspired needle, insertion tests into artificial and biological tissues were performed using both honeybee-inspired and conventional needles. The barb design parameters effects on needle forces were studied through multiple insertion and extraction tests into PVC gels. The design parameters values of the barbs were experimentally modified to further reduce the ultimate insertion and extraction forces of the needle. Bioinspired needle with modified barb design parameters values reduces the insertion force by 35%, and the extraction force by 20%. To show the relevance, the insertion tests into bovine liver and brain tissue were performed. Our results show that there was a 10-25% decrease in the insertion force for insertions into bovine brain, and a 35-45% reduction in the insertion force for insertions into the bovine liver using the proposed bioinspired needles. The bioinspired and conventional needles were manufactured in different scales and then used to study the size scale effect on our results. To do so, the insertion tests into tissue-mimicking PVC gels and liver tissues were performed. The results obtained for different sizes of the needle showed 25-46% decrease in the insertion force. The tissue deformations study was conducted to measure tissue deformation during the insertion using digital image correlation. The tissue deformation results showed 17% decrease in tissue deformation using barbed needles. A histological study was performed to accurately measure the damage caused by needle insertion. Our results showed 33% less tissue damage using bioinspired needles. The results of the histological study are in agreement with our hypothesis that reducing needle forces and tissue deformation lead to less invasive percutaneous procedures.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Hutapea, Parsaoran;, Ren, Fei, Darvish, Kurosh, Tehrani, Rouzbeh Afsarmanesh;.

Subjects/Keywords: Mechanical engineering; Biomechanics; Design;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sahlabadi, M. (2018). A NOVEL BIOINSPIRED DESIGN FOR SURGICAL NEEDLES TO REDUCE TISSUE DAMAGE IN INTERVENTIONAL PROCEDURES. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,508489

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sahlabadi, Mohammad. “A NOVEL BIOINSPIRED DESIGN FOR SURGICAL NEEDLES TO REDUCE TISSUE DAMAGE IN INTERVENTIONAL PROCEDURES.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 28, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,508489.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sahlabadi, Mohammad. “A NOVEL BIOINSPIRED DESIGN FOR SURGICAL NEEDLES TO REDUCE TISSUE DAMAGE IN INTERVENTIONAL PROCEDURES.” 2018. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Sahlabadi M. A NOVEL BIOINSPIRED DESIGN FOR SURGICAL NEEDLES TO REDUCE TISSUE DAMAGE IN INTERVENTIONAL PROCEDURES. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,508489.

Council of Science Editors:

Sahlabadi M. A NOVEL BIOINSPIRED DESIGN FOR SURGICAL NEEDLES TO REDUCE TISSUE DAMAGE IN INTERVENTIONAL PROCEDURES. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,508489


Temple University

2. Kaveh, Rashid. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF SOYBEAN (GLYCINE MAX) AND THALE CRESS (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA) PLANTS EXPOSED TO DIFFERENT CLASSES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Civil Engineering

Plants are exposed to various environmental contaminants through irrigation with reclamation water and land application of municipal biosolids. Plants have been shown to take up contaminants from soil and groundwater, and to some extent, metabolize them in their tissues. These mechanisms have potential important implications for the environment and human health. First, as plants constitute the basis of the terrestrial food chain, accumulation of toxic chemicals or their metabolites inside plant tissues may lead to contamination of animals and humans. Second, the recognition of the capability of plants to take up and metabolize contaminants has led to the development of a plant-based remediation technology, referred to as phytoremediation. Phytoremediation is defined as the use of higher plants for the removal of environmental contaminants from soil and groundwater. Although phytoremediation is conceptually attractive as a green, environmental-friendly technology, the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds by plants is often slow and incomplete, possibly resulting in the accumulation of toxic pollutants and/or their metabolites inside plant tissues. Without further detoxification, phytoremediation may result in pollution transfer, potentially threatening the food chain, and eventually humans. Gaining further knowledge about the fate of environmental contaminants inside plant tissues is therefore of paramount importance for conducting environmental risk assessment and enhancing the efficiency of phytoremediation applications. It's an attractive concept today to cultivate plants on contaminated lands, in order to combine the benefits of phytoremediation with plant-based biofuel production. Unlike conventional plant bioenergy production, plant biomass grown on marginal contaminated soil will not compete with land for food production. However, the effect of contaminants on the plant biomass and bioenergy feedstock yield have received little attention. Molecular biology techniques, such as high-throughput gene expression analysis, constitute powerful tools to understand the molecular bases of the plant metabolism and response to environmental contaminants. The objective of this thesis is to understand the physiological and transcriptional responses of two model plants, thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) and soybean (Glycine max), exposed to various classes of contaminants, including silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), pharmaceuticals (zanamivir - ZAN and oseltamivir phosphate - OSP), explosives (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene - TNT), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Detection of the contaminants inside plants tissues was performed using advance analytical methods, including inductively-coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), gas-chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid-chromatography (LC-MS). The effects of contaminants on plants were assessed by recording various plant metrics, including biomass, root and shoot length, and soybean production. The transcriptional response of plants to exposure to…

Advisors/Committee Members: Van Aken, Benoit;, Suri, Rominder P.S., Eisenman, Sasha W., Tehrani, Rouzbeh Afsarmanesh, Strongin, Daniel R.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental engineering;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kaveh, R. (2014). TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF SOYBEAN (GLYCINE MAX) AND THALE CRESS (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA) PLANTS EXPOSED TO DIFFERENT CLASSES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,303672

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kaveh, Rashid. “TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF SOYBEAN (GLYCINE MAX) AND THALE CRESS (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA) PLANTS EXPOSED TO DIFFERENT CLASSES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 28, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,303672.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kaveh, Rashid. “TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF SOYBEAN (GLYCINE MAX) AND THALE CRESS (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA) PLANTS EXPOSED TO DIFFERENT CLASSES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS.” 2014. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Kaveh R. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF SOYBEAN (GLYCINE MAX) AND THALE CRESS (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA) PLANTS EXPOSED TO DIFFERENT CLASSES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,303672.

Council of Science Editors:

Kaveh R. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF SOYBEAN (GLYCINE MAX) AND THALE CRESS (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA) PLANTS EXPOSED TO DIFFERENT CLASSES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,303672


Temple University

3. Ranjbar Kolachaie, Sibia. USE OF MICROALGAE FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION: EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Civil Engineering

Microalga-based technologies are introduced to provide a new generation of biofuels. The cultivation of microalgae in wastewater as the growth medium may offer the dual benefit of wastewater treatment and sustainable biofuel production. The potential of microalgal biomass to be converted into biodiesel depends on the accumulation of lipids, mainly triacylglycerols. However, the presence of toxic contaminants in municipal or industrial wastewater could negatively affect the biomass growth and modify the pattern of lipid accumulation in algae cells. This research aims to evaluate the potential of cultivating microalgae in wastewater for the removal of selected contaminants and the production of biodiesel. The hypothesis underlying this work was that growing microalgae in the presence of contaminants, typically found in wastewater, may induce a stress response that potentially increases the lipid productivity and enhances the biofuel yield. This research explored the potential of microalgae to be used for the removal of wastewater pollutants while accumulating high concentrations of neutral lipid that can be converted into biodiesel. Physiological and transcriptional responses of two genera of green algae were observed in the presence of stresses induced by toxic metals in raw hydraulic fracturing flowback water and pharmaceuticals found in municipal wastewater. Two green algae, Dunaliella salina and Chlorella vulgaris, were selected based on the availability of genetic information, current trends in the alga industry, and specific growth requirement in hypersaline flowback water and municipal wastewater. The first part of this research focuses on the possibility of using the salt-tolerant green microalga, D. salina, for the removal of toxic metals from hydraulic fracturing flowback water. In the second part of this research, the freshwater green microalga, C. vulgaris, was exposed to a suite of pharmaceuticals, commonly found in municipal wastewater, and the effects on the biomass growth and lipid accumulation were evaluated. In Chapter 3, aqueous geochemical characteristics of hydraulic fracturing flowback water were determined. Metagenomic analysis was also used to characterize the microbial community structure of the water samples. This technique included DNA extraction, PCR amplification of genes for 16S and 18S ribosomal RNA, and pyrosequencing. Although the two flowback water samples were shown to have water property measures in the range of reported values in literature, they were significantly different from each other regarding water properties such as total dissolved solids and total organic carbon. They also had distinct microbial community structures. It was shown the flowback water samples contained mainly halophilic, anaerobic, and thermophilic species with a pattern that was expected to be seen in natural gas shale reservoirs. Chapter 4 covers the characterization of the effects of contaminants (toxic metals) in hydraulic fracturing flowback water on the biomass growth and cellular…

Advisors/Committee Members: Van Aken, Benoit;, Pleshko, Nancy, Strongin, Daniel R., Suri, Rominder P.S., Tehrani, Rouzbeh Afsarmanesh;.

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental engineering; Engineering; Biology;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ranjbar Kolachaie, S. (2015). USE OF MICROALGAE FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION: EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,361879

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ranjbar Kolachaie, Sibia. “USE OF MICROALGAE FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION: EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 28, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,361879.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ranjbar Kolachaie, Sibia. “USE OF MICROALGAE FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION: EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE.” 2015. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Ranjbar Kolachaie S. USE OF MICROALGAE FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION: EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,361879.

Council of Science Editors:

Ranjbar Kolachaie S. USE OF MICROALGAE FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION: EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,361879

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