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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Son, Young-Jin"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Skuba, Andrew. In vivo imaging analysis of the regeneration failure of dorsal root axons in adult mice.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Cell Biology

After injury, dorsal root (DR) axons regenerate in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), but turn around or stop at the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the entrance into the central nervous system (CNS). Examination of the dynamic axon regeneration that occurs following injury to the DR provides the opportunity to advance our understanding of what happens to sensory axons as they approach and arrive at the DREZ and expands our knowledge of sensory axon regeneration failure at the entrance to the spinal cord. Additionally, findings from these studies may offer potential avenues to provide insight into regeneration failure elsewhere in the central nervous system. Nevertheless, our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes underlying the failure of DR axons to regenerate through the DREZ is incomplete. The goal of my thesis work was to determine whether application of the time lapse-in vivo imaging technique is feasible and useful in studying dorsal root regeneration. I have also applied recently developed post-mortem analyses to the axons monitored in vivo, which provided additional insights into the mechanisms that prevent axon regeneration at the DREZ. Results in Chapters 2 and 3 demonstrate that wide-field microscopy is indeed feasible and useful for monitoring regenerating sensory axons immediately before, during, and in the days to weeks after lumbar (L5) DR crush. I was surprised to find that most axons were immobilized abruptly and chronically at the CNS portion of the DREZ, with their axon tips and shafts exhibiting features of differentiated nerve terminals. This observation raises the possibility, which has not been appreciated previously, that DR axons stop at the DREZ because their regeneration is terminated prematurely by forming synaptic contacts with unidentified postsynaptic cells. To confirm the immobilization of DR axons at the DREZ, I applied two-photon microscopy to examine the axon behavior at the DREZ at high resolution. Results described in Chapter 4 confirm those obtained with the time-lapse imaging performed with wide-field microscopy: axons arrested soon after their arrival at the DREZ did not exhibit even subtle movements. Light microscopic analyses of the failed axon tips monitored in vivo demonstrated that almost all axons stopped at the CNS territory of the DREZ, and that axon tips and adjacent shafts intensely immunolabeled with synapse markers. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that numerous axonal profiles had the characteristic features of pre- but not postsynaptic endings. Findings from these studies lead us to speculate that most, if not all, dorsal root axons become arrested as they enter the CNS territory of the DREZ by forming presynaptic terminals on non-neuronal cellular elements that differ from the dystrophic-like endings formed by a few axons. In the chapter 5, I discuss what I have found to be the key factors for successful monitoring of regenerating dorsal root axons in living animals; the feasibility, usefulness and limitations of the available…

Advisors/Committee Members: Son, Young-Jin, Barbe, Mary F.;, Son, Young-Jin, Barbe, Mary F., Gallo, Gianluca, Kim, Seonhee, Smith, George M., Ramirez, Servio;.

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular biology; Neurosciences;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Skuba, A. (2014). In vivo imaging analysis of the regeneration failure of dorsal root axons in adult mice. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,292900

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Skuba, Andrew. “In vivo imaging analysis of the regeneration failure of dorsal root axons in adult mice.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,292900.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Skuba, Andrew. “In vivo imaging analysis of the regeneration failure of dorsal root axons in adult mice.” 2014. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Skuba A. In vivo imaging analysis of the regeneration failure of dorsal root axons in adult mice. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,292900.

Council of Science Editors:

Skuba A. In vivo imaging analysis of the regeneration failure of dorsal root axons in adult mice. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,292900


Temple University

2. Collura, Kaitlin Marie. Palmitoylation-Dependent Regulation of the DLK/JNK/cJun and the GP130/JAK/STAT Retrograde Signaling Pathways.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Biomedical Sciences

Palmitoylation is the post-translational addition of the 16-carbon fatty acid palmitate to protein cysteine residues. This process is best known for its roles in targeting proteins to lipid membranes, including both the plasma membrane and vesicles. Palmitoylation occurs in all eukaryotic cells, but appears to be particularly important in neurons, because genetic mutation or loss of several palmitoyl acyltransferases (PATs, the enzymes that catalyze palmitoylation), leads to predominantly neuropathological defects. In addition, a growing number of recent studies have revealed key roles for palmitoylation of specific proteins in neuronal regulation. However, most of these studies have focused on how palmitoylation regulates postsynaptic protein targeting. In contrast, it is far less clear how palmitoylation might regulate the specialized subcellular processes that are important in axons. One particularly important process in axons is retrograde signaling, in which information is conveyed from distal locations back to the cell body. Following injury to axons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), retrograde signals are critical to activate transcription of pro-regenerative genes. Key retrograde signaling pathways include the DLK/JNK/c-Jun (Dual Leucine Zipper Kinase/c-Jun N-terminal Kinase/c-Jun) signaling pathway and the GP130/JAK/STAT (Glycoprotein 130/Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) signaling pathway, both of which are activated following nerve injury and are vital to promote regeneration. Though both of these pathways are critical for conveying distal information from the periphery to the cell body, many of their component proteins are predicted to be soluble and diffusible. This raises the question of how these proteins can directionally signal over the long distances that axons extend. Interestingly, bio-informatic and proteomic studies suggested that DLK, GP130, JAK and STAT may be palmitoylated. We hypothesized that palmitoylation could be important for the roles of these proteins in retrograde signaling. Because retrograde signals are initiated in distal axons, a considerable distance from the cell body, we further hypothesized axonally localized PATs might play key roles in the control of retrograde signaling. We find that the retrograde signaling protein DLK is palmitoylated at a highly conserved cysteine residue. This modification is necessary for its localization to motile vesicles and for its interaction with the retrograde signaling protein JIP3. Notably, we also describe a novel role for palmitoylation in regulating DLK’s kinase activity. In addition, our study identifies the first axonally enriched PATs in sensory neurons; DHHC5 and DHHC8. shRNA knockdown experiments in sensory neurons reveal that these axonal PATs control both palmitoylation and surface expression of GP130 and are essential for GP130/JAK/STAT3-dependent retrograde signaling. These findings reveal a novel role for palmitoylation in the control of axonal retrograde signaling,…

Advisors/Committee Members: Thomas, Gareth;, Soprano, Dianne R., Ramirez, Servio, Son, Young-Jin, Shore, Scott K.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Neurosciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Collura, K. M. (2015). Palmitoylation-Dependent Regulation of the DLK/JNK/cJun and the GP130/JAK/STAT Retrograde Signaling Pathways. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,426710

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Collura, Kaitlin Marie. “Palmitoylation-Dependent Regulation of the DLK/JNK/cJun and the GP130/JAK/STAT Retrograde Signaling Pathways.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,426710.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Collura, Kaitlin Marie. “Palmitoylation-Dependent Regulation of the DLK/JNK/cJun and the GP130/JAK/STAT Retrograde Signaling Pathways.” 2015. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Collura KM. Palmitoylation-Dependent Regulation of the DLK/JNK/cJun and the GP130/JAK/STAT Retrograde Signaling Pathways. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,426710.

Council of Science Editors:

Collura KM. Palmitoylation-Dependent Regulation of the DLK/JNK/cJun and the GP130/JAK/STAT Retrograde Signaling Pathways. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,426710

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