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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Popoff, Steven N."). Showing records 1 – 17 of 17 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Rani, Shobha. Periostin-like-factor in tissue repair and remodeling.

Degree: PhD, 2010, Temple University

Anatomy

Perisotin-like-factor (PLF) is a member of the Fasciclin family of proteins, which are characterized by the presence of 150 amino acid long conserved Fasciclin… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology, Cell; bone; muscle; Periostin; Periostin-like-factor; satellite cell; tendon

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APA (6th Edition):

Rani, S. (2010). Periostin-like-factor in tissue repair and remodeling. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,87264

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rani, Shobha. “Periostin-like-factor in tissue repair and remodeling.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,87264.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rani, Shobha. “Periostin-like-factor in tissue repair and remodeling.” 2010. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Rani S. Periostin-like-factor in tissue repair and remodeling. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,87264.

Council of Science Editors:

Rani S. Periostin-like-factor in tissue repair and remodeling. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,87264


Temple University

2. Singh, Harinder. CAVEOLAE AS SPATIO-TEMPORAL COMPARTMENTS FOR ROS/RNS GENERATION AND NITROXIDATIVE STRESS SIGNALING.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Cell Biology

During inflammatory conditions excessive production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS), peroxynitrite, is implicated in the development of vascular pathologies. Our… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Singh, H. (2014). CAVEOLAE AS SPATIO-TEMPORAL COMPARTMENTS FOR ROS/RNS GENERATION AND NITROXIDATIVE STRESS SIGNALING. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,275561

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Singh, Harinder. “CAVEOLAE AS SPATIO-TEMPORAL COMPARTMENTS FOR ROS/RNS GENERATION AND NITROXIDATIVE STRESS SIGNALING.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,275561.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Singh, Harinder. “CAVEOLAE AS SPATIO-TEMPORAL COMPARTMENTS FOR ROS/RNS GENERATION AND NITROXIDATIVE STRESS SIGNALING.” 2014. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Singh H. CAVEOLAE AS SPATIO-TEMPORAL COMPARTMENTS FOR ROS/RNS GENERATION AND NITROXIDATIVE STRESS SIGNALING. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,275561.

Council of Science Editors:

Singh H. CAVEOLAE AS SPATIO-TEMPORAL COMPARTMENTS FOR ROS/RNS GENERATION AND NITROXIDATIVE STRESS SIGNALING. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,275561


Temple University

3. Joshi, Rupali Narayan. IDENTIFICATION OF MECHANISMS OF DELAYED PUBERTY ON BONE STRENGTH DEFICITS DURING DEVELOPMENT.

Degree: PhD, 2010, Temple University

Kinesiology

Osteoporosis which is frequently referred to as a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences (Golden, 2000) can result from a lack of optimal bone accrual… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology, Physiology; BONE STRENGTH; DELAYED PUBERTY; ENERGY RESTRICTION; ESTROGEN DEFICIENCY; GnRH-a; OSTEOPOROSIS

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APA (6th Edition):

Joshi, R. N. (2010). IDENTIFICATION OF MECHANISMS OF DELAYED PUBERTY ON BONE STRENGTH DEFICITS DURING DEVELOPMENT. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,55431

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Joshi, Rupali Narayan. “IDENTIFICATION OF MECHANISMS OF DELAYED PUBERTY ON BONE STRENGTH DEFICITS DURING DEVELOPMENT.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,55431.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Joshi, Rupali Narayan. “IDENTIFICATION OF MECHANISMS OF DELAYED PUBERTY ON BONE STRENGTH DEFICITS DURING DEVELOPMENT.” 2010. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Joshi RN. IDENTIFICATION OF MECHANISMS OF DELAYED PUBERTY ON BONE STRENGTH DEFICITS DURING DEVELOPMENT. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,55431.

Council of Science Editors:

Joshi RN. IDENTIFICATION OF MECHANISMS OF DELAYED PUBERTY ON BONE STRENGTH DEFICITS DURING DEVELOPMENT. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,55431


Temple University

4. Kietrys, David. The Effects of High Repetition Low Force Motion on Tendon Integrity and Motor Behavior in an Animal Model of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders.

Degree: PhD, 2010, Temple University

Physical Therapy

The National Occupational Research Agenda stresses the importance of identifying work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) risk factors, understanding their exposure dependent nature, and identifying… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy; Biology, Cell; Biology, Morphology; exposure-dependence; motor behavior; pathophysiology; repetitive motion injury; tendon; work-related musculoskeletal disorders

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APA (6th Edition):

Kietrys, D. (2010). The Effects of High Repetition Low Force Motion on Tendon Integrity and Motor Behavior in an Animal Model of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,73145

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kietrys, David. “The Effects of High Repetition Low Force Motion on Tendon Integrity and Motor Behavior in an Animal Model of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,73145.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kietrys, David. “The Effects of High Repetition Low Force Motion on Tendon Integrity and Motor Behavior in an Animal Model of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders.” 2010. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Kietrys D. The Effects of High Repetition Low Force Motion on Tendon Integrity and Motor Behavior in an Animal Model of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,73145.

Council of Science Editors:

Kietrys D. The Effects of High Repetition Low Force Motion on Tendon Integrity and Motor Behavior in an Animal Model of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,73145


Temple University

5. Brennan, Tracy A. Abrogation of Cbl-PI3K Interaction Increases Bone Volume and Osteoblast Proliferation.

Degree: PhD, 2011, Temple University

Cell Biology

Cbl is a multivalent protein that interacts with a number of signaling molecules that affect cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Although it is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular Biology; Biology; Bone; Cbl; Osteoblasts; PI3K

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APA (6th Edition):

Brennan, T. A. (2011). Abrogation of Cbl-PI3K Interaction Increases Bone Volume and Osteoblast Proliferation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,107475

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brennan, Tracy A. “Abrogation of Cbl-PI3K Interaction Increases Bone Volume and Osteoblast Proliferation.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,107475.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brennan, Tracy A. “Abrogation of Cbl-PI3K Interaction Increases Bone Volume and Osteoblast Proliferation.” 2011. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Brennan TA. Abrogation of Cbl-PI3K Interaction Increases Bone Volume and Osteoblast Proliferation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,107475.

Council of Science Editors:

Brennan TA. Abrogation of Cbl-PI3K Interaction Increases Bone Volume and Osteoblast Proliferation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,107475


Temple University

6. Marcu, Jahan Phillip. Novel Insights into CB1 Receptor Signaling and the Anabolic Role of Cannabinoid Receptors in Bone.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Temple University

Cell Biology

Activation of the CB1 receptor is modulated by aspartate residue D2.63176 in transmembrane helix (TMH) II. Interestingly, D2.63 does not affect the affinity… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Molecular biology; Pharmacology; Biochemistry;

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APA (6th Edition):

Marcu, J. P. (2013). Novel Insights into CB1 Receptor Signaling and the Anabolic Role of Cannabinoid Receptors in Bone. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,233543

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marcu, Jahan Phillip. “Novel Insights into CB1 Receptor Signaling and the Anabolic Role of Cannabinoid Receptors in Bone.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,233543.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marcu, Jahan Phillip. “Novel Insights into CB1 Receptor Signaling and the Anabolic Role of Cannabinoid Receptors in Bone.” 2013. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Marcu JP. Novel Insights into CB1 Receptor Signaling and the Anabolic Role of Cannabinoid Receptors in Bone. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,233543.

Council of Science Editors:

Marcu JP. Novel Insights into CB1 Receptor Signaling and the Anabolic Role of Cannabinoid Receptors in Bone. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,233543


Temple University

7. Lambi, Alex G. The Intricate Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Prenatal Osteogenesis: A Heretofore Oversimplified Dogma of the CCN Field.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Cell Biology

Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is axiomatically necessary for proper skeletal development and function. We need not look further than the studies that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular biology; Developmental biology;

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APA (6th Edition):

Lambi, A. G. (2015). The Intricate Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Prenatal Osteogenesis: A Heretofore Oversimplified Dogma of the CCN Field. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,233693

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lambi, Alex G. “The Intricate Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Prenatal Osteogenesis: A Heretofore Oversimplified Dogma of the CCN Field.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,233693.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lambi, Alex G. “The Intricate Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Prenatal Osteogenesis: A Heretofore Oversimplified Dogma of the CCN Field.” 2015. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lambi AG. The Intricate Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Prenatal Osteogenesis: A Heretofore Oversimplified Dogma of the CCN Field. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,233693.

Council of Science Editors:

Lambi AG. The Intricate Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Prenatal Osteogenesis: A Heretofore Oversimplified Dogma of the CCN Field. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,233693


Temple University

8. Hendesi, Honey. CONNECTIVE TISSUE GROWTH FACTOR (CTGF/CCN2) REGULATES OSTEOBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REORGANIZATION AND MOTILITY AND ENHANCES DIFFERENTIATION VIA BINDING TO INTEGRIN RECEPTORS AND ACTIVATION OF DOWNSTREAM SIGNALINGS.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Cell Biology

Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) is a matricellular protein that has been shown to mediate cell adhesion, and as a consequence, it regulates… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular biology;

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APA (6th Edition):

Hendesi, H. (2014). CONNECTIVE TISSUE GROWTH FACTOR (CTGF/CCN2) REGULATES OSTEOBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REORGANIZATION AND MOTILITY AND ENHANCES DIFFERENTIATION VIA BINDING TO INTEGRIN RECEPTORS AND ACTIVATION OF DOWNSTREAM SIGNALINGS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,263674

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hendesi, Honey. “CONNECTIVE TISSUE GROWTH FACTOR (CTGF/CCN2) REGULATES OSTEOBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REORGANIZATION AND MOTILITY AND ENHANCES DIFFERENTIATION VIA BINDING TO INTEGRIN RECEPTORS AND ACTIVATION OF DOWNSTREAM SIGNALINGS.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,263674.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hendesi, Honey. “CONNECTIVE TISSUE GROWTH FACTOR (CTGF/CCN2) REGULATES OSTEOBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REORGANIZATION AND MOTILITY AND ENHANCES DIFFERENTIATION VIA BINDING TO INTEGRIN RECEPTORS AND ACTIVATION OF DOWNSTREAM SIGNALINGS.” 2014. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Hendesi H. CONNECTIVE TISSUE GROWTH FACTOR (CTGF/CCN2) REGULATES OSTEOBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REORGANIZATION AND MOTILITY AND ENHANCES DIFFERENTIATION VIA BINDING TO INTEGRIN RECEPTORS AND ACTIVATION OF DOWNSTREAM SIGNALINGS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,263674.

Council of Science Editors:

Hendesi H. CONNECTIVE TISSUE GROWTH FACTOR (CTGF/CCN2) REGULATES OSTEOBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REORGANIZATION AND MOTILITY AND ENHANCES DIFFERENTIATION VIA BINDING TO INTEGRIN RECEPTORS AND ACTIVATION OF DOWNSTREAM SIGNALINGS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,263674


Temple University

9. Mundy, Christina Maria. The Interaction Between Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 During Osteoblast Differentiation and Function.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Cell Biology

Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 are both produced and secreted by osteoblasts. Both proteins have been shown to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular biology;

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APA (6th Edition):

Mundy, C. M. (2014). The Interaction Between Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 During Osteoblast Differentiation and Function. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,269581

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mundy, Christina Maria. “The Interaction Between Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 During Osteoblast Differentiation and Function.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,269581.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mundy, Christina Maria. “The Interaction Between Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 During Osteoblast Differentiation and Function.” 2014. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Mundy CM. The Interaction Between Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 During Osteoblast Differentiation and Function. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,269581.

Council of Science Editors:

Mundy CM. The Interaction Between Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 During Osteoblast Differentiation and Function. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,269581


Temple University

10. Massicotte, Vicky S. THE EFFECTS OF OVERUSE ON CELLULAR, MOLECULAR AND MORPHOMETRIC BONE HOMEOSTASIS IN A VOLUNTARY REPETITIVE STRAIN INJURY RAT MODEL.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Cell Biology

Injuries of the hands and wrist are prevalent in many occupations requiring repetitive tasks and may be further aggravated by advancing age; these… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular biology; Occupational health;

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APA (6th Edition):

Massicotte, V. S. (2014). THE EFFECTS OF OVERUSE ON CELLULAR, MOLECULAR AND MORPHOMETRIC BONE HOMEOSTASIS IN A VOLUNTARY REPETITIVE STRAIN INJURY RAT MODEL. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,305196

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Massicotte, Vicky S. “THE EFFECTS OF OVERUSE ON CELLULAR, MOLECULAR AND MORPHOMETRIC BONE HOMEOSTASIS IN A VOLUNTARY REPETITIVE STRAIN INJURY RAT MODEL.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,305196.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Massicotte, Vicky S. “THE EFFECTS OF OVERUSE ON CELLULAR, MOLECULAR AND MORPHOMETRIC BONE HOMEOSTASIS IN A VOLUNTARY REPETITIVE STRAIN INJURY RAT MODEL.” 2014. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Massicotte VS. THE EFFECTS OF OVERUSE ON CELLULAR, MOLECULAR AND MORPHOMETRIC BONE HOMEOSTASIS IN A VOLUNTARY REPETITIVE STRAIN INJURY RAT MODEL. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,305196.

Council of Science Editors:

Massicotte VS. THE EFFECTS OF OVERUSE ON CELLULAR, MOLECULAR AND MORPHOMETRIC BONE HOMEOSTASIS IN A VOLUNTARY REPETITIVE STRAIN INJURY RAT MODEL. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,305196


Temple University

11. Fisher, Paul William. THE ROLE OF CYTOKINES AND SUBSTANCE P IN REPETITIVE LOADING-INDUCED BEHAVIORAL DECLINES AND TISSUE FIBROSIS.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Cell Biology

Key clinical features of cumulative trauma disorders include pain, muscle weakness, and tissue fibrosis, although the etiology is still under investigation. Therefore, we… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular biology; Behavioral sciences; Biomechanics;

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APA (6th Edition):

Fisher, P. W. (2015). THE ROLE OF CYTOKINES AND SUBSTANCE P IN REPETITIVE LOADING-INDUCED BEHAVIORAL DECLINES AND TISSUE FIBROSIS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336057

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fisher, Paul William. “THE ROLE OF CYTOKINES AND SUBSTANCE P IN REPETITIVE LOADING-INDUCED BEHAVIORAL DECLINES AND TISSUE FIBROSIS.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336057.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fisher, Paul William. “THE ROLE OF CYTOKINES AND SUBSTANCE P IN REPETITIVE LOADING-INDUCED BEHAVIORAL DECLINES AND TISSUE FIBROSIS.” 2015. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Fisher PW. THE ROLE OF CYTOKINES AND SUBSTANCE P IN REPETITIVE LOADING-INDUCED BEHAVIORAL DECLINES AND TISSUE FIBROSIS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336057.

Council of Science Editors:

Fisher PW. THE ROLE OF CYTOKINES AND SUBSTANCE P IN REPETITIVE LOADING-INDUCED BEHAVIORAL DECLINES AND TISSUE FIBROSIS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336057


Temple University

12. Frara, Nagat. THE ROLE OF OSTEOACTIVIN IN MUSCULOSKELETAL TISSUES AS A REPAIR AND ANABOLIC FACTOR.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Cell Biology

Osteoactivin (OA) is a novel osteogenic and repair factor. It has the ability to regulate cell proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, and synthesis and regulation… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Frara, N. (2015). THE ROLE OF OSTEOACTIVIN IN MUSCULOSKELETAL TISSUES AS A REPAIR AND ANABOLIC FACTOR. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336629

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Frara, Nagat. “THE ROLE OF OSTEOACTIVIN IN MUSCULOSKELETAL TISSUES AS A REPAIR AND ANABOLIC FACTOR.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336629.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Frara, Nagat. “THE ROLE OF OSTEOACTIVIN IN MUSCULOSKELETAL TISSUES AS A REPAIR AND ANABOLIC FACTOR.” 2015. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Frara N. THE ROLE OF OSTEOACTIVIN IN MUSCULOSKELETAL TISSUES AS A REPAIR AND ANABOLIC FACTOR. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336629.

Council of Science Editors:

Frara N. THE ROLE OF OSTEOACTIVIN IN MUSCULOSKELETAL TISSUES AS A REPAIR AND ANABOLIC FACTOR. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336629


Temple University

13. Zhang, Xuemei. Src Kinase Signaling Regulates Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) Induction by Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 (TGF-b1) in Osteoblasts.

Degree: PhD, 2010, Temple University

Anatomy

Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a cysteine rich, extracellular matrix protein that acts as an anabolic growth factor to regulate osteoblast differentiation and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Cell

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APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, X. (2010). Src Kinase Signaling Regulates Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) Induction by Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 (TGF-b1) in Osteoblasts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,63095

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Xuemei. “Src Kinase Signaling Regulates Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) Induction by Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 (TGF-b1) in Osteoblasts.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,63095.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Xuemei. “Src Kinase Signaling Regulates Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) Induction by Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 (TGF-b1) in Osteoblasts.” 2010. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Zhang X. Src Kinase Signaling Regulates Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) Induction by Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 (TGF-b1) in Osteoblasts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,63095.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang X. Src Kinase Signaling Regulates Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) Induction by Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 (TGF-b1) in Osteoblasts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,63095


Temple University

14. Singh, Maneet. TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF OSTEOACTIVIN EXPRESSION BY BMP-2 IN OSTEOBLASTS.

Degree: PhD, 2011, Temple University

Cell Biology

Osteoactivin (OA) is a glycoprotein required for the differentiation of osteoblasts. In osteoblasts, Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2) activated Smad1 signaling enhances OA expression.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular Biology; Molecular Biology; Biology; HOMEDOMAIN PROTEIN; OSTEOACTIVIN; OSTEOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION; RUNX2; SMAD1 AND SMAD4; TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION

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APA (6th Edition):

Singh, M. (2011). TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF OSTEOACTIVIN EXPRESSION BY BMP-2 IN OSTEOBLASTS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,135232

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Singh, Maneet. “TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF OSTEOACTIVIN EXPRESSION BY BMP-2 IN OSTEOBLASTS.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,135232.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Singh, Maneet. “TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF OSTEOACTIVIN EXPRESSION BY BMP-2 IN OSTEOBLASTS.” 2011. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Singh M. TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF OSTEOACTIVIN EXPRESSION BY BMP-2 IN OSTEOBLASTS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,135232.

Council of Science Editors:

Singh M. TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF OSTEOACTIVIN EXPRESSION BY BMP-2 IN OSTEOBLASTS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,135232


Temple University

15. Belcher, Joyce Yvonne. Bone Cell Autonomous Effects of Osteoactivin In Vivo.

Degree: PhD, 2012, Temple University

Cell Biology

Osteoactivin (OA) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein initially identified in bone in 2002. The protein is synthesized, processed and heavily glycosylated by… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular biology; Animal Model; Gpnmb; Osteoactivin; Osteoblasts; Osteoclasts; Osteopetrosis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Belcher, J. Y. (2012). Bone Cell Autonomous Effects of Osteoactivin In Vivo. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,183061

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Belcher, Joyce Yvonne. “Bone Cell Autonomous Effects of Osteoactivin In Vivo.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,183061.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Belcher, Joyce Yvonne. “Bone Cell Autonomous Effects of Osteoactivin In Vivo.” 2012. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Belcher JY. Bone Cell Autonomous Effects of Osteoactivin In Vivo. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,183061.

Council of Science Editors:

Belcher JY. Bone Cell Autonomous Effects of Osteoactivin In Vivo. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,183061


Temple University

16. Verenna, Anne-Marie Alexandria. INVESTIGATIONS OF ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS OF THE THORAX AND HEART AND ANATOMICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR FIRST YEAR MEDICAL DENTAL AND PODIATRY STUDENTS.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Temple University

Cell Biology

The universal presence of anatomy in healthcare professions is undeniable. It is a cornerstone to each of the clinical and basic sciences. Therefore,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Health sciences; Higher education;

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APA (6th Edition):

Verenna, A. A. (2013). INVESTIGATIONS OF ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS OF THE THORAX AND HEART AND ANATOMICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR FIRST YEAR MEDICAL DENTAL AND PODIATRY STUDENTS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,221870

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Verenna, Anne-Marie Alexandria. “INVESTIGATIONS OF ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS OF THE THORAX AND HEART AND ANATOMICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR FIRST YEAR MEDICAL DENTAL AND PODIATRY STUDENTS.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,221870.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Verenna, Anne-Marie Alexandria. “INVESTIGATIONS OF ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS OF THE THORAX AND HEART AND ANATOMICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR FIRST YEAR MEDICAL DENTAL AND PODIATRY STUDENTS.” 2013. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Verenna AA. INVESTIGATIONS OF ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS OF THE THORAX AND HEART AND ANATOMICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR FIRST YEAR MEDICAL DENTAL AND PODIATRY STUDENTS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,221870.

Council of Science Editors:

Verenna AA. INVESTIGATIONS OF ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS OF THE THORAX AND HEART AND ANATOMICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR FIRST YEAR MEDICAL DENTAL AND PODIATRY STUDENTS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,221870


Temple University

17. Back, Steven. TULA-2: A Novel Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase That Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation and Function.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Cell Biology

The human skeleton is a dynamic organ that serves multiple functions to maintain normal physiology and health. It protects vital organs, provides support… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cellular biology; Biochemistry; Molecular biology;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Back, S. (2014). TULA-2: A Novel Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase That Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation and Function. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,254886

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Back, Steven. “TULA-2: A Novel Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase That Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation and Function.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,254886.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Back, Steven. “TULA-2: A Novel Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase That Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation and Function.” 2014. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Back S. TULA-2: A Novel Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase That Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation and Function. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,254886.

Council of Science Editors:

Back S. TULA-2: A Novel Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase That Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation and Function. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,254886

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