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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Mawhinney, Lynnette;"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Porterfield, Laura Krstal. Hidden in plain sight: Young Black women, place, and visual culture.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Temple University

Urban Education

Hidden curriculum scholars have long since recognized the function of the visual in shaping the educational experiences of youth. Scholars have noted that the hidden curriculum of schooling has functioned as a primary socialization mechanism to reproduce capitalism, the state, gender, racial, and class-based inequalities. Today, urban high school spaces present both invisible and visible curricula that are shaped not only by the many images that comprise a school's visual culture, but also by the wider visual landscape. This is of particular import for working-class young Black women who are often framed and seen as social and economic problems within the discourse on urban schools/urban school failure. This discourse teaches. It is taught in and through the everyday visual texts, spaces, and places young Black women navigate to the point that the discourse linking Black femaleness, poverty, and failure becomes natural/normal. It is normalized to the point that it becomes "hidden in plain sight." The simultaneous transparency and invisibility of knowledge presents urban educators concerned about the Black girl and other youth of color with three intersecting problems. First, the educative role of the visual has been underexplored in the research literature on urban schools/urban schooling. Second, within the context of urban schools, we do not know enough about if and or how the educative role of the visual shapes young Black women's relationship with teaching and learning. Third, we do not know if or how the contentious relationship between visual learning inside and visual learning outside of school shapes young Black women's relationship with education as a formal institution and or a process. Given these three intersecting problems, this dissertation project centers on examining the educative impacts of place, visual culture, and design in an effort to fill the gap in the scholarship regarding this portion of the educational experiences of young Black women. Using visual ethnography and discourse analysis as primary methods, I engage a group of five primary student participants who attend a non-traditional, design-focused science and technology magnet school where they are one of the largest student cohorts. Einstein 2.0 is an instance of a progressive, non-normative, small learning community that is attentive to the power of the visual in shaping the teaching and learning experiences, especially for youth of color. In this way, it is a case that can help us better understand the challenges, opportunities, and complexities of harnessing the visual in the urban school context. In this study I argue that by creating a safe and emotionally engaging environment that rejects using punitive disciplinary frameworks and pseudo-factory/pseudo-prison design, Einstein's visual and school culture gave rise to an increased sense of emotional readiness for both producing and receiving knowledge that stands in sharp contrast to the more traditional ways urban schools often approach managing and…

Advisors/Committee Members: Sanders, Rickie;, Horvat, Erin McNamara, Davis, James Earl, Mawhinney, Lynnette, Cucchiara, Maia Bloomfield;.

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Secondary education; Women's studies;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Porterfield, L. K. (2013). Hidden in plain sight: Young Black women, place, and visual culture. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,238388

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Porterfield, Laura Krstal. “Hidden in plain sight: Young Black women, place, and visual culture.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,238388.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Porterfield, Laura Krstal. “Hidden in plain sight: Young Black women, place, and visual culture.” 2013. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Porterfield LK. Hidden in plain sight: Young Black women, place, and visual culture. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,238388.

Council of Science Editors:

Porterfield LK. Hidden in plain sight: Young Black women, place, and visual culture. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,238388


Temple University

2. Baldwin-Rana, Brandi Michelle. Confirming and Disconfirming Communication Practices of Teachers in Urban Classrooms.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Urban Education

Interpersonal communication practices of teachers have been recognized as having a significant impact on the relational dynamics between teachers and students; however, the specific interpersonal communication practices utilized by teachers of urban students are not well understood. Although teacher-student interactions have been studied for many years, the research has not focused on how confirmation and disconfirmation are perceived in urban classroom environments. Furthermore, minimal research exists regarding how perceived confirmation and disconfirmation impacts urban teacher-student relationships. Using a qualitative approach, this study examines the confirming and disconfirming communication practices of teachers from 4 urban charter high schools. In addition, this study examines how the 22 teacher participants and 26 student participants perceive the communication practices as impacting teacher-student relationships. A finding from the data was respect. Both teachers and students identified respect as being the single most critical factor to building teacher-student relationships. Confirming behaviors like honesty/openness, praise/positive feedback, checking for understanding, and calmly correcting behaviors were identified as having a positive impact on the relationship-building process. Disconfirming behaviors such as disrespect, putting students on the spot, sarcasm, and aggressive tone were identified as hindering the relationship-building process. Descriptions of each theme are provided as well as implications for teacher practice and future research.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Jordan, Will J.;, Davis, James Earl, Hunt, Portia L., Sanford-Deshields, Jayminn, Mawhinney, Lynnette;.

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Communication;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Baldwin-Rana, B. M. (2015). Confirming and Disconfirming Communication Practices of Teachers in Urban Classrooms. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,332297

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baldwin-Rana, Brandi Michelle. “Confirming and Disconfirming Communication Practices of Teachers in Urban Classrooms.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,332297.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baldwin-Rana, Brandi Michelle. “Confirming and Disconfirming Communication Practices of Teachers in Urban Classrooms.” 2015. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Baldwin-Rana BM. Confirming and Disconfirming Communication Practices of Teachers in Urban Classrooms. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,332297.

Council of Science Editors:

Baldwin-Rana BM. Confirming and Disconfirming Communication Practices of Teachers in Urban Classrooms. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,332297

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