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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Mason, Robert J."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Schwebel, Michael Bryan. Climate Change Adaptation and Policy in Pacific Small Island States: Safe Havens or Adrift at Sea?.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Geography

Pacific Small Island States (PSIS) are in the precarious position as some of the first jurisdictions to grapple with the current and forecasted effects of climate change, such as forced migrations and loss of culture. Yet, islanders' viewpoints are neither often fully understood nor heeded by those at the international decision making levels. Therefore, how and to what extent are PSIS successfully preparing for climate change? This completed study used a mixed methods approach that examines nissology - how islanders view and understand themselves - and its relationship with successful (discussed and defined within the study) adaptation planning. The study also used a mixed methods approach to juxtapose the findings of the nissological and success analyses with a second research question: an in-depth study and analysis of regional and global policymaking entities, and the degrees to which they may influence islanders' preparation for climate change. The study examined 18 PSIS and their Climate Change Adaptation Plans (CCAPs) and then interviewed PSIS' representatives at their respective Missions to the United Nations in New York City to evaluate how PSIS view and foresee current and future policies regarding climate change at the global, regional, and local levels. Then, fieldwork was performed within the United States Territories in the Pacific: American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands to obtain on-the-ground information regarding implementation of plans, policies, and projects. The study attempted to address two specific gaps in the literature via the triangulation of methods and data: the relationship between an island-centric viewpoint of CCAPs and successful climate change as well as how policymaking in the Pacific at the local, regional, and global levels either assisted or hindered successful climate change adaptation policy. The results suggested answers to these two key questions as well as several unexpected or emergent findings. Regarding the two principal research questions, PSIS that crafted their CCAPs in a more nissological or island-centric manner were indicative of states that were foreseen to be more successful in adapting to current and future climate change effects. Next, PSIS that were part of AOSIS, the various regional associations, and those PSIS that had complete sovereignty (independent) were indicative of those PSIS expressing greater overall success at preparing for climate change than those PSIS not meeting these criteria. However, not all PSIS had the opportunity to become members of AOSIS or certain regional organizations for various reasons. Finally, a policy document was created at the end of the study to illustrate some of the best practices based upon this study's findings. Immediately preceding the policy document are other emergent findings indicative of future areas of research and exploration within the realms of nissology, regional associations and partnerships, and successful climate change adaptation.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Mason, Robert J.;, Anderson, Lynne Mary, Pearsall, Charlyn, Rosan, Christina;.

Subjects/Keywords: Climate change; Geography; Sustainability;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schwebel, M. B. (2015). Climate Change Adaptation and Policy in Pacific Small Island States: Safe Havens or Adrift at Sea?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,325385

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schwebel, Michael Bryan. “Climate Change Adaptation and Policy in Pacific Small Island States: Safe Havens or Adrift at Sea?.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 06, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,325385.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schwebel, Michael Bryan. “Climate Change Adaptation and Policy in Pacific Small Island States: Safe Havens or Adrift at Sea?.” 2015. Web. 06 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Schwebel MB. Climate Change Adaptation and Policy in Pacific Small Island States: Safe Havens or Adrift at Sea?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2021 May 06]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,325385.

Council of Science Editors:

Schwebel MB. Climate Change Adaptation and Policy in Pacific Small Island States: Safe Havens or Adrift at Sea?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,325385


Temple University

2. Flatley, Elizabeth D. “Our Forever Home”: Loss of Place and Shale Gas Development in Western Pennsylvania.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Sociology

The Marcellus Shale is a sedimentary rock formation that lies beneath most of Pennsylvania as well as portions of Ohio, West Virginia, New York, and Maryland, and holds one of the world’s largest natural gas reserves. It has been known that the Marcellus is a sizeable gas reservoir, but until the recent development of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, it had not been economically feasible to exploit it. These unconventional drilling methods currently used in Pennsylvania and other Marcellus regions are deeply controversial, with both experts and laypersons disagreeing over their threat to the environment and public health. The result has been great scientific and public uncertainty over the risks and rewards of Marcellus Shale development. This dissertation explores how Marcellus Shale development in Western Pennsylvania impacts the social lives of residents, and the ways in which residents respond to these impacts. In particular, I emphasize the social and cultural challenges of communities and how place-based meanings influence resident behavior. The data come from a comparative case study of two rural areas in Western Pennsylvania with differing intensity and duration of local shale gas development, Washington and Lawrence Counties. Washington County had its first unconventional shale well in 2004 and had 709 shale wells at the start of my fieldwork in October 2013. In contrast, Lawrence County had its first shale well in 2011, and had 20 shale wells when I began my research. Through multi-sited ethnography—which included field observations, participant observation at various public events, and open-ended interviews with residents and community stakeholders—I examine how variations in the duration and intensity of development may influence resident experiences and response with local shale development. This research finds that the main social and cultural challenges for Washington County residents were conflicts between old-timers and newcomers. Specifically, old-timers and newcomers experienced discord over the differences or perceived differences of opinion on local shale gas development. In Lawrence County, there was less conflict between old-timers and newcomers, and the conflicts that arose were often in response to the actions of outspoken anti-drilling activists. In both study counties, residents with primary ties to the physical aspects of place were dissatisfied with landscape changes brought about by local shale development and engaged in collective action in the attempt to change the way shale development was occurring, or to stop it altogether. While residents in Washington and Lawrence Counties had similar motivations for engaging in collective action—the protection of family, others, and home—they differed in their actions and strategies. Resident experiences with and actions toward local shale development varied between the two counties, which may be due to the differing intensities and duration of development. Washington County residents focused their collective strategies…

Advisors/Committee Members: Wray, Matt;, Waidzunas, Thomas J., Mason, Robert J., Pearsall, Charlyn;.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Flatley, E. D. (2015). “Our Forever Home”: Loss of Place and Shale Gas Development in Western Pennsylvania. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336236

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Flatley, Elizabeth D. ““Our Forever Home”: Loss of Place and Shale Gas Development in Western Pennsylvania.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 06, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336236.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Flatley, Elizabeth D. ““Our Forever Home”: Loss of Place and Shale Gas Development in Western Pennsylvania.” 2015. Web. 06 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Flatley ED. “Our Forever Home”: Loss of Place and Shale Gas Development in Western Pennsylvania. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2021 May 06]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336236.

Council of Science Editors:

Flatley ED. “Our Forever Home”: Loss of Place and Shale Gas Development in Western Pennsylvania. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,336236


Temple University

3. Jacobson, Sarah. GROWING THE GREEN CITY: NAVIGATING THE TENSIONS OF VALUE-FREE DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY IN PHILADELPHIA.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Sociology

This dissertation focuses on the relationship between sustainability and growth as it plays out through sustainable development projects in Philadelphia. Cities are interested in adopting policies and practices that will make them greener. In 2009, Philadelphia adopted its first sustainability plan, Greenworks, and throughout the past decade, many other cities have adopted similar plans. This has happened at the same time that cities have attempted to address their shrinking populations and coffers by aggressively pursuing pro-growth strategies. This dissertation explores the tension between growth and sustainability and, given this tension, how the process of sustainable development plays out in Philadelphia. This research focuses on green building and urban greening projects using a single-case embedded case study design. Projects of varying scales are examined - including large- and small-scale sustainable development projects. Data comes primarily from in-depth interviews, which were conducted over the course of one year with project managers, sustainability professionals, government bureaucrats, and community members, among others. The data from these interviews are supplemented with historical archival records, open government records, and other primary and secondary sources. This research highlights two tensions in the sustainable development process. First, the politics of development give rise to a tension between exchange value and use value. On one hand are powerful urban actors who believe that development of urban space should be value-free, or guided by the free market. On the other are community members who may value the space for another purpose. The second tension is between different approaches to resource use in urban development. Most measures of economic success are tied to growth, or the extent to which we collectively produce and consume goods. However, the production of goods is fueled by natural resources, which are dwindling. There is a tension between how pro-growth and pro-sustainability actors view resource use. This research contributes to the literature by examining the relationship between these tensions, or how the value-free politics of development are reconciled with the crisis of natural resource consumption. The results of this analysis show that sustainability initiatives are treated by powerful urban actors as means to a growth-oriented end, rather than as ends in themselves. This is true even when these actors frame their discussions of sustainability in ideological terms. They believe that sustainability is a worthy endeavor, insofar as it also coincides with a growth-oriented agenda. The production of green buildings and green open places supports green place making, which is an important component of commodifying - and growing - the green city. The tension between sustainability and growth, however, are a point of weakness where traditional growth-oriented politics of development may be challenged.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Shlay, Anne B.;, Wray, Matt, Mason, Robert J., Featherstone, Jeffrey, Ph. D.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; Sustainability;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jacobson, S. (2015). GROWING THE GREEN CITY: NAVIGATING THE TENSIONS OF VALUE-FREE DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY IN PHILADELPHIA. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,302778

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jacobson, Sarah. “GROWING THE GREEN CITY: NAVIGATING THE TENSIONS OF VALUE-FREE DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY IN PHILADELPHIA.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 06, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,302778.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jacobson, Sarah. “GROWING THE GREEN CITY: NAVIGATING THE TENSIONS OF VALUE-FREE DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY IN PHILADELPHIA.” 2015. Web. 06 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Jacobson S. GROWING THE GREEN CITY: NAVIGATING THE TENSIONS OF VALUE-FREE DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY IN PHILADELPHIA. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2021 May 06]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,302778.

Council of Science Editors:

Jacobson S. GROWING THE GREEN CITY: NAVIGATING THE TENSIONS OF VALUE-FREE DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY IN PHILADELPHIA. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,302778

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