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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Krynska, Barbara;"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Lamberti, Giuseppina. A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Mechanical Engineering

There is a clear need for testing targeted drug carrier systems in a more realistic microenvironment where both biochemical interactions and shear forces are present. This is critical both for understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in this process and during the drug discovery process. Current in vitro models of the leukocyte adhesion cascade cannot be used for real-time studies of the entire leukocyte adhesion cascade including rolling, adhesion and migration in a single assay. In this study, we have developed and validated a novel bioinspired microfluidic device (bMFD) and used it to test the hypothesis that blocking of specific steps in the adhesion/migration cascade significantly affects other steps of the cascade. The bMFD consists of an endothelialized microvascular network in communication with a tissue compartment via a 3 µm porous barrier. Human neutrophils in bMFD preferentially adhered to activated human endothelial cells near bifurcations with rolling and adhesion patterns in close agreement with in vivo observations. Treating endothelial cells with monoclonal antibodies to E-selectin or ICAM-1 or treating neutrophils with wortmannin reduced rolling, adhesion, and migration of neutrophils to 60%, 20% and 18% of their respective control values. Antibody blocking of specific steps in the adhesion/migration cascade (e.g. mAb to E-selectin) significantly downregulated other steps of the cascade (e.g. migration). This novel in vitro assay provides a realistic human cell based model for basic science studies, identification of new treatment targets, selection of pathways to target validation, and rapid screening of candidate agents.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Kiani, Mohammad F.;, Wang, Bin, Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar, Achary, Mohan P., Pillapakkam, Shriram, Krynska, Barbara;.

Subjects/Keywords: Engineering; Mechanical engineering;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lamberti, G. (2014). A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,265841

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lamberti, Giuseppina. “A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,265841.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lamberti, Giuseppina. “A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE.” 2014. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lamberti G. A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,265841.

Council of Science Editors:

Lamberti G. A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,265841


Temple University

2. Keefe, Kathleen Mary. In Vivo Visualization of Neural Pathways in the Rat Spinal Cord Using Viral Tracing.

Degree: PhD, 2018, Temple University

Neuroscience

Much of our understanding of the fascinating complexity of neuronal circuits comes from anatomical tracing studies that use dyes or fluorescent markers to highlight pathways that run through the brain and spinal cord. Viral vectors have been utilized by many previous groups as tools to highlight pathways or deliver transgenes to neuronal populations to stimulate growth after injury. In a series of studies, we explore anterograde and retrograde tracing with viral vectors to trace spinal pathways and explore their contribution to behavior in a rodent model. In a separate study, we explore the effect of stimulating intrinsic growth programs on regrowth of corticospinal tract (CST) axons after contusive injury. In the first study, we use self-complimentary adeno associated viral (scAAV) vectors to trace long descending tracts in the spinal cord. We demonstrate clear and bright labeling of cortico-, rubro- and reticulospinal pathways without the need for IH, and show that scAAV vectors transduce more efficiently than single stranded AAV (ssAAV) in neurons of both injured and uninjured animals. This study demonstrates the usefulness of these tracers in highlighting pathways descending from the brain. Retrograde tracing is also a key facet of neuroanatomical studies involving long distance projection neurons. In the next study, we highlight a lentivirus that permits highly efficient retrograde transport (HiRet) from synaptic terminals within the cervical and lumbar enlargements of the spinal cord. By injecting HiRet, we can clearly identify supraspinal and propriospinal circuits innervating MN pools relating to forelimb and hindlimb function. We observed robust labeling of propriospinal neurons, including high fidelity details of dendritic arbors and axon terminals seldom seen with chemical tracers. In addition, we examine changes in interneuronal circuits occurring after a thoracic contusion, highlighting populations that potentially contribute to spontaneous behavioral recovery in this lesion model. In a related study, we use a modified version of HiRet as part of a multi-vector system that synaptically silences neurons to explore the contribution of the rubrospinal tract (RST) and CST to forelimb motor behavior in an intact rat. This system employs Tetanus toxin at the neuronal synapse to prevent release of neurotransmitter via cleavage of vesicle docking proteins, effectively preventing the propagation of action potentials in those neurons. We find that shutdown of the RST has no effect on gross forelimb motor function in the intact state, and that shutdown of a small population of CST neurons in the FMC has a modest effect on grip strength. These studies demonstrate that the HiRet lentivirus is a unique tool for examining neuronal circuitry and its contribution to function. In the final study, we explore stimulation of the Phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Rac-alpha serine/threonine Protein Kinase (PI3K/AKT) growth pathway by antagonizing phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a major inhibitor, to encourage…

Advisors/Committee Members: Smith, George M.;, Krynska, Barbara, Hu, Wenhui, Li, Shuxin, Lemay, Michel A.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Neurosciences; Health sciences; Cellular biology;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Keefe, K. M. (2018). In Vivo Visualization of Neural Pathways in the Rat Spinal Cord Using Viral Tracing. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,521830

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keefe, Kathleen Mary. “In Vivo Visualization of Neural Pathways in the Rat Spinal Cord Using Viral Tracing.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,521830.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keefe, Kathleen Mary. “In Vivo Visualization of Neural Pathways in the Rat Spinal Cord Using Viral Tracing.” 2018. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Keefe KM. In Vivo Visualization of Neural Pathways in the Rat Spinal Cord Using Viral Tracing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,521830.

Council of Science Editors:

Keefe KM. In Vivo Visualization of Neural Pathways in the Rat Spinal Cord Using Viral Tracing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,521830

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