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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Joslyn, Richard"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Pittaoulis, Melissa Anastasia. Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future.

Degree: PhD, 2012, Temple University

Sociology

This dissertation examines the strategies that students use for navigating their way through college and the steps they take in preparation for college graduation. I wrote this dissertation because I wanted to understand how students go from being freshmen not long out of high school to young adults prepared (or not prepared) to enter the workforce or attend graduate or professional school. Past research has found that as high school students, many young people are generally directionless when it comes to learning about different career paths (Schneider and Stevenson 2006). Moreover, in the U.S., there is very little structural support for helping students navigate the transition from student to worker. While universities may offer programs that can aid students in finding jobs or applying to graduate schools, it is largely up to students to seek these programs out. This dissertation therefore investigates the question, "How much do college students plan for their post-college lives?" To accomplish my research goals, I focus on two areas in which students may demonstrate planfulness: choosing a college major and planning for post-graduation careers or schooling. I seek to answer three general questions. First, what reasons do students give for attending college? Second, how planful are students when selecting their college majors? Third, how planful are students in preparing for their future educational and occupational goals? To answer these questions, I collected my own data using a mixed methodology research design that included in-depth interviews with 31 students and a survey of nearly 500 college seniors at a large, northeastern university. This study adds to the literature on the transition to adulthood by studying the school-to-work transition. It also contributes to the sociology of education literature by shedding light on how college students make decisions about college majors. The survey shows that many students simultaneously hold both utilitarian and liberal arts philosophies toward higher education. The majority of survey respondents reported that they were motivated to attend college because of both the extrinsic and intrinsic rewards that a college education offers. Meanwhile, the in-depth interviews suggest that parental expectations, which were also commonly cited by survey respondents as reasons for attending college, are very powerful influences in students' decisions to attend college. Regarding college major choices, the survey results suggest that students find school experience more influential than the prospects of a potential career. In total, about two-thirds of respondents gave "present-oriented" rather than "future-oriented" reasons for choosing their majors. When looking at individual reasons for selecting a major, I found that passion for or interest in a subject was by far the reason cited most often as most important. The in-depth interview data provide further insight into the relationship between college majors and post-graduation plans. These interviews show that it…

Advisors/Committee Members: Ericksen, Eugene, Grasmuck, Sherri, Goyette, Kimberly A., Joslyn, Richard.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; Sociology of education; college majors; college students; planfulness; post-graduation plans; transition to adulthood

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pittaoulis, M. A. (2012). Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,204404

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pittaoulis, Melissa Anastasia. “Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,204404.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pittaoulis, Melissa Anastasia. “Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future.” 2012. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Pittaoulis MA. Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,204404.

Council of Science Editors:

Pittaoulis MA. Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,204404


Temple University

2. Weikert, Joshua John. Balancing Act: How an Unbalanced Media Affects the Electorate.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Temple University

Political Science

Previous studies of media bias generally do not consider intra-campaign shifts in the composition of the coverage, leaving unanswered the question of whether coverage is consistently balanced or merely appears so when all the ups and downs of the election are tallied up. Even this aggregate assessment of balance frequently reveals imbalance in coverage, but there are few studies that test for effects of media imbalance. A lack of comprehensive content analysis data makes substantive work in this area challenging and frequently dependent upon single-election studies or those that examine a single variable over multiple years. This project takes advantage of a highly detailed, project-generated content analysis of all NBC Nightly News broadcasts and New York Times articles during the general election period (from just prior to the national party conventions through Election Day) for four election years (1996, 2000, 2004, and 2008) to address the question of whether aggregate and intra-campaign imbalance exists along three axes: volume of coverage (total coverage of the campaign and candidates), share of coverage (percentage of coverage received by each candidate on a given day, not conflated with volume), and tone of coverage (average daily valence score of coverage, positive or negative). Share of coverage is not stable at any point of equilibrium, but swings back and forth, favoring one candidate then the other throughout the general election. Analysis of tone of coverage reveals a surprising correlation between the positive/negative coverage of the candidates, with tone of coverage of the candidates correlating to a statistically significant degree. With this data it is possible to test whether shifts in the composition of coverage cause shifts in electoral support as measured by trial heat polls. Analysis of the data shows a significant relationship between changes in share and tone of coverage and changes in levels of electoral support. The corollary question, "what attracts media attention?" shows that media outlets are attracted by conflict as determined by a qualitative and quantitative analysis of headlines and share of coverage, and a further test shows a significant correlation between media coverage of an issue and both candidates' mention of that issue in their remarks, though not between media coverage and a single-candidate mention of the issue. The end result is a more-comprehensive picture of political reporting, its effect on the electorate, and the ways in which candidates may attract attention than is currently available in the literature. The combination of a multi-election measure with a high degree of intra-campaign diagnostic sensitivity provides a useful benchmark for the further study of media coverage of campaigns, as well as more than sufficient justification for its substantive significance as an area of political study, by virtue of the observed relationship between coverage and levels of electoral support.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Hagen, Michael Gray;, Joslyn, Richard, Chomsky, Daniel, Yannella, Philip;.

Subjects/Keywords: Political Science; Journalism; Communication;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Weikert, J. J. (2013). Balancing Act: How an Unbalanced Media Affects the Electorate. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216606

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Weikert, Joshua John. “Balancing Act: How an Unbalanced Media Affects the Electorate.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216606.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Weikert, Joshua John. “Balancing Act: How an Unbalanced Media Affects the Electorate.” 2013. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Weikert JJ. Balancing Act: How an Unbalanced Media Affects the Electorate. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216606.

Council of Science Editors:

Weikert JJ. Balancing Act: How an Unbalanced Media Affects the Electorate. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216606

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