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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Haller, Mark H."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Zhao, Shuo. Underground Banks: The Perspectives of Chinese Illegal Immigrants in Understanding the Role of Chinese Informal Fund Transfer Systems in the United States.

Degree: PhD, 2009, Temple University

Criminal Justice

The financial link in the process of illegal immigration is a little researched domain in the literature. This research is the first exploratory study to examine the role of Chinese-operated informal fund transfer systems in the U.S. in the lives of Chinese illegal migrant workers and their families who remained in China. The primary source of data was in-depth interviews with thirty illegal immigrants in New York City and Philadelphia. The findings show that the emergence of underground banks in the U.S. coincided with the largest waves of Chinese illegal immigrants smuggled into the U.S. since the later 1980s. They served as a preferred means of fund transfer among Chinese illegals due to their unique service, not necessarily because of the clients' illegal status, or any coercive actions by human smuggling groups. Through inductive analysis based on the narrative data, this research is able to trace the trajectory of the evolution of Chinese underground banks over the past decades. The evidence seems to suggest an indirect role played by these illegal fund transfer systems in sustaining transnational illegal labor migration achieved through human smuggling. The research also suggests a declining importance of underground banks and a shift away from their use toward legitimate fund transfer channels among Chinese illegal immigrants since the mid-1990s and a seemingly new role of formal institutions in filling in the vacancy left by underground banks. Finally, the findings suggest that underground banks may have been forced to and have adapted to a narrower and more illicit use.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Goldkamp, John S., Haller, Mark H., Auerhahn, Kathleen.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology, Criminology and Penology; Human smuggling; Illegal financing; Illegal immigration; Informal fund transfer systems; Underground banking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhao, S. (2009). Underground Banks: The Perspectives of Chinese Illegal Immigrants in Understanding the Role of Chinese Informal Fund Transfer Systems in the United States. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,49816

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhao, Shuo. “Underground Banks: The Perspectives of Chinese Illegal Immigrants in Understanding the Role of Chinese Informal Fund Transfer Systems in the United States.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,49816.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhao, Shuo. “Underground Banks: The Perspectives of Chinese Illegal Immigrants in Understanding the Role of Chinese Informal Fund Transfer Systems in the United States.” 2009. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Zhao S. Underground Banks: The Perspectives of Chinese Illegal Immigrants in Understanding the Role of Chinese Informal Fund Transfer Systems in the United States. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,49816.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhao S. Underground Banks: The Perspectives of Chinese Illegal Immigrants in Understanding the Role of Chinese Informal Fund Transfer Systems in the United States. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,49816


Temple University

2. Adams, James Hugo. The Problem of the Ages: Prostitution in the Philadelphia Imagination, 1880-1940.

Degree: PhD, 2009, Temple University

History

An ever-present figure throughout much of the nineteenth century, the prostitute existed in a state divorced from "traditional" womanhood as a shadowy yet "necessary" evil, and was largely seen as a static element of the city. The archetypes of the "endangered maiden" and the "fallen woman" were discursive creations evolving from an inchoate form to a more sharply defined state that were designed to explain the prostitute's continued existence despite the moral objections voiced by religious and social reformers. These archetypes functioned in an agrarian/proto-industrial society; however, under pressures of urbanization, industrialization, and population mobility, these archetypes were gradually supplanted by sharper, more emotionally loaded archetypes such as the "White Slave" and the trope of the "Vice Syndicate" to explain the prostitute. In this manner Progressive-Era social and moral reformers could interpret prostitution in general and the prostitute in particular within the framework of their understanding of a contentious social environment. In moving away from a religious framework towards a more scientific interpretation, the concept of prostitution evolved from a moral failing to a status analogous to a disease that infected the social body of the state. However, because the White Slave and the Vice Syndicate were discursive creations based upon anecdotal interpretations of prostitution as a predatory economic system, their nebulous nature encouraged a crisis mentality that could not survive a concrete examination of their "problem." Realities of race, class, and gender, as well as the fluid nature of the urban environment as well as non-moral concerns rendered the new archetypes and tropes slippery, and applicable to any reform-oriented argument. By the later years of the Progressive Era anti-vice discourse ceased to advocate moral arguments calling for the rescue of the prostitute and instead became a vehicle to articulate non-moral concerns such as political reform, social order, and female economic suffrage. After the First World War, the archetype of the White Slave collapsed in the face of women's suffrage and sexual agency, and the prostitute once more reverted to a state analogous to pre-Progressive cultural interpretations of prostitution.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Haller, Mark H., Varon, Elizabeth R., Cutler, William W., Ruth, David E..

Subjects/Keywords: History, United States; Culture; Delaware Valley; Pennsylvania; Philadelphia; Progressive Era; Prostitution

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Adams, J. H. (2009). The Problem of the Ages: Prostitution in the Philadelphia Imagination, 1880-1940. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,71127

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Adams, James Hugo. “The Problem of the Ages: Prostitution in the Philadelphia Imagination, 1880-1940.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,71127.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Adams, James Hugo. “The Problem of the Ages: Prostitution in the Philadelphia Imagination, 1880-1940.” 2009. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Adams JH. The Problem of the Ages: Prostitution in the Philadelphia Imagination, 1880-1940. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,71127.

Council of Science Editors:

Adams JH. The Problem of the Ages: Prostitution in the Philadelphia Imagination, 1880-1940. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,71127

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