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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Giesberg, Judith;"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Pfeuffer-Scherer, Dolores Marie. Remembrance and The American Revolution: Women and the 1876 Centennial Exhibition.

Degree: PhD, 2016, Temple University

History

The United States Centennial was a pivotal event to celebrate the founding of the American nation. People came together to show the unity and progress of the United States, specifically after the division of the Civil War. As the industrial revolution took off in earnest, Americans were keen to show the world that they were united and taking the lead in industrial change. Further, to show that the United States was a force in the world, other nations were invited to participate by displaying their culture at the event. The Women’s Centennial Executive Committee (WCEC) became part of the effort to raise funds early on in the process. A group of thirteen women joined together with Benjamin Franklin’s great-granddaughter selected as their president and they set forth to raise funds and gain publicity for a “Woman’s Section” in the main building. When that prospect was denied them, the women then began to again raise monies, but this time for their own Women’s Pavilion. Determined not to be cut out of the exhibition, the women labored tirelessly to make their ideas reality. To raise funds and to draw attention to women’s contributions to society, the women drew upon the females of the founding generation to gain legitimacy in their efforts as women active in the civic sector. Harkening back to the American Revolution, the WCEC inserted women as active participants in the founding of the nation and they used images of Martha Washington and Sarah Franklin Bache to raise funds and bolster their cause. Women, who had sacrificed as men had for the birth of the nation, were noble members of the republic; in presenting women’s labors and inventions in 1876, the WCEC was making the point that women’s lives and contributions in nineteenth century America were as vital and necessary as they had been in the eighteenth century. The rewriting of the narrative of the American Revolution enabled the WCEC to celebrate women’s accomplishments in the most public manner and to herald their achievement in both domestic production as well as in terms of education and employment. The women of 1876 formed a continuous line backwards to the Revolution, and they showed the world that American women had always been a vital part of the country and that, if afforded their rights, they would continue to do so into the future.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Kusmer, Kenneth L.;, Waldstreicher, David, Klepp, Susan E., Giesberg, Judith;.

Subjects/Keywords: American history;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pfeuffer-Scherer, D. M. (2016). Remembrance and The American Revolution: Women and the 1876 Centennial Exhibition. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,417346

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pfeuffer-Scherer, Dolores Marie. “Remembrance and The American Revolution: Women and the 1876 Centennial Exhibition.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,417346.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pfeuffer-Scherer, Dolores Marie. “Remembrance and The American Revolution: Women and the 1876 Centennial Exhibition.” 2016. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Pfeuffer-Scherer DM. Remembrance and The American Revolution: Women and the 1876 Centennial Exhibition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,417346.

Council of Science Editors:

Pfeuffer-Scherer DM. Remembrance and The American Revolution: Women and the 1876 Centennial Exhibition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2016. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,417346


Temple University

2. Drago, Elliott. NEITHER NORTHERN NOR SOUTHERN: THE POLITICS OF SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN PHILADELPHIA, 1820-1847.

Degree: PhD, 2017, Temple University

History

This dissertation examines the conflict over slavery and freedom in Philadelphia from 1820 to 1847. As the northernmost southern city in a state that bordered three slave states, Philadelphia maintained a long tradition of abolitionism and fugitive slave activity. Conflicts that arose over fugitive slaves and the kidnapping of free African-Americans forced Philadelphians to confront the politics of slavery. This dissertation argues that until 1847, Pennsylvania was in effect a slave state. The work of proslavery groups, namely slave masters, their agents, white and black kidnappers, and local, state, and national political supporters, undermined the ostensible successes of state laws designed to protect the freedom of African-Americans in Pennsylvania. Commonly referred to as “liberty laws,” this legislation exposed the inherent difficulty in determining the free or enslaved status of not only fugitive slaves but also African-American kidnapping victims. By studying the specific fugitive or kidnapping cases that inspired these liberty laws, one finds that time and again African-Americans and their allies forced white politicians to grapple with the reality that Pennsylvania was not a safe-haven for African-Americans, regardless of their condition of bondage or freedom. Furthermore, these cases often precipitated into desperate rescues and bloody riots on the streets of Philadelphia; these civil wars in miniature reflected the negotiated and compromised realities of living while black in the city. Ordinary African-Americans living in Philadelphia bore the burden of comity, or friendly relations between states, by practicing what I term “street diplomacy”: the up-close and personal struggles over freedom and slavery that had local, state, and national ramifications. In a larger sense, street diplomacy in Philadelphia magnified the stakes of national comity, i.e. the Union, by showcasing how dividing states by their condition of bondage remained impossible due to permeable geographic borders that fostered perpetual fugitive slave and kidnapping crises. Thus, this dissertation argues that African-Americans and their allies’ struggles with slave-masters, slave-catchers, kidnappers and proslavery politicians disrupted the best efforts of white politicians to maintain a compromised and compromising Union.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Isenberg, Andrew (Andrew Christian);, Wells, Jonathan Daniel, Giesberg, Judith, Neptune, Harvey R., Roney, Jessica, Miller, Randall M.;.

Subjects/Keywords: American history; African American studies; Political science;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Drago, E. (2017). NEITHER NORTHERN NOR SOUTHERN: THE POLITICS OF SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN PHILADELPHIA, 1820-1847. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,428229

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Drago, Elliott. “NEITHER NORTHERN NOR SOUTHERN: THE POLITICS OF SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN PHILADELPHIA, 1820-1847.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,428229.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Drago, Elliott. “NEITHER NORTHERN NOR SOUTHERN: THE POLITICS OF SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN PHILADELPHIA, 1820-1847.” 2017. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Drago E. NEITHER NORTHERN NOR SOUTHERN: THE POLITICS OF SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN PHILADELPHIA, 1820-1847. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,428229.

Council of Science Editors:

Drago E. NEITHER NORTHERN NOR SOUTHERN: THE POLITICS OF SLAVERY AND FREEDOM IN PHILADELPHIA, 1820-1847. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,428229

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