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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Gaycken, Oliver"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Desiderio, Matthew John. Wandering: Seeing the Cinema of Wim Wenders through Cultural Theory and Naturalized Phenomenology.

Degree: PhD, 2011, Temple University

English

In both form and content, Wim Wenders's films create a cinema of wandering, tracing a route of intersections between the modern and postmodern visual landscape. The space of the world, its deserted horizons and populated streets, are a kind of visual architecture through which the mobile vision of the film wanders, just as Wenders's peripatetic characters wander through space and time towards encounters with others. This wandering invites a phenomenological understanding of embodied spectator experience and perception, for as much as Wenders's films are about the representative image, they are also about the dynamic relationship of the embodied spectator to the visible world. A first avenue of inquiry leads through the deserts and cities that shape the visual terrain of Wenders's cinema. These locations are always sites (places) and sights (images) of recuperation that offer critique, analysis, and resistance to the hyperreal and the reductive visual practices of postmodernity. A second route follows the journeys of both Wenders's characters and films. The insistence in existential phenomenology that meaning and intentionality inhere in the body's motility provides a starting point for elucidating the relationship of cinematic technology to embodied vision. The film and the spectator share a way of being in the world, and the wandering vision and audition that shape the journeys of Wenders's films are always expressions of the modern experience of space and time. Finally, this dissertation undertakes a third course, applying naturalized phenomenology to a reading of the encounters of Wenders's wandering subjects. This methodology allows for a clearer understanding of the socially mediated subject, and of the relationship of spectator to film. The dynamic mirroring that constitutes cinematic experience as it occurs neurologically and phenomenologically shapes cinematic encounters. Film is a mirror, but more significantly, the spectator is a mirror. For the spectator, as for Wenders's characters, wandering is a way of engaging the contingencies of the other and confronting the truths and lies behind cinematic illusion.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Gaycken, Oliver, Singer, Alan, Alter, Nora M., Corrigan, Timothy.

Subjects/Keywords: Film Studies; Mirror Neurons; Modernity; Neurophenomenology; Phenomenology; Wandering; Wenders

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Desiderio, M. J. (2011). Wandering: Seeing the Cinema of Wim Wenders through Cultural Theory and Naturalized Phenomenology. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,114897

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Desiderio, Matthew John. “Wandering: Seeing the Cinema of Wim Wenders through Cultural Theory and Naturalized Phenomenology.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 10, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,114897.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Desiderio, Matthew John. “Wandering: Seeing the Cinema of Wim Wenders through Cultural Theory and Naturalized Phenomenology.” 2011. Web. 10 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Desiderio MJ. Wandering: Seeing the Cinema of Wim Wenders through Cultural Theory and Naturalized Phenomenology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2021 May 10]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,114897.

Council of Science Editors:

Desiderio MJ. Wandering: Seeing the Cinema of Wim Wenders through Cultural Theory and Naturalized Phenomenology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,114897


Temple University

2. Woodworth, Amy Jean. From Buddy Film to Bromance: Masculinity and Male Melodrama Since 1969.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

English

Men's tears are considered rare, and women's tears are considered profusive. Thus, we tend to think of tearjerkers and melodrama as the province of weepy women viewers. However, if we look back at the last several decades of Hollywood filmmaking, melodramas focused on men – or "male weepies" – have been a steady staple of American cinema. This dissertation explores cycles of male melodramas since 1969, placing them in their socio-historical contexts and examining the ways that they participate in public discourses about men, masculinity, and gender roles. Melodrama's focus on victims, bids for virtue, and idealizations of not how things are, but how they should be, have made it a fitting and flexible mode for responding to the changing social landscape of America since the rights movements of the 1960s. Specifically, these films consider both the ways that white capitalist patriarchy has circumscribed the public and private lives of men and the ways that advancements of women and racial minorities are impacting (white) men's lives. This study analyzes the rhetorical effects of these films through both textual evidence and popular reception. Chapters are organized by chronology and subgenre, discussing buddy films of the late 1960s and early 1970s (Midnight Cowboy, The Last Detail, and Scarecrow), paternal melodramas of the late 1970s and early 1980s (The Great Santini, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Table for Five), films of sensitive men in the early 1990s (The Prince of Tides, Regarding Henry, and Philadelphia), and black male weepies from the 1990s and 2000s (Boyz in the Hood, Antwone Fisher, John Q, and The Pursuit of Happyness). The epilogue also considers the developing genre of the bromance, a hybrid of melodrama and comedy. By classifying and analyzing these films as male melodramas, this dissertation challenges both the popular denigrating view that tearjerkers are "chick flicks," and the continued gender bifurcation within film studies' work on melodrama as a narrative mode, which tends to treat weepies as a female form of melodrama and action films as a male form of melodrama. While individual subgenres have received some critical attention, this dissertation is one of the first works to look at male weepies collectively. Putting the spotlight on male weepies reveals Hollywood's interest in gender and the emotional lives of men, though the films display a mix of progressive and conservative strains, often common in Hollywood filmmaking. Specifically, these weepies tend to question and often even reject traditional masculine ideals, and thus exhibit some forms of gender "liberation"; at the same time that they show men suffering under patriarchy and even the pressure to be powerful, these films also shore that power up for men by never forfeiting it. As such, these films reveal the dangers of Hollywood "doing" gender critique: however inadvertently, they contain feminist, anti-racist, and anti-homophobic challenges and re-inscribe the various privileges of characters (in terms of gender, race, sexuality,…

Advisors/Committee Members: Orvell, Miles;, Melzer, Patricia, Gaycken, Oliver, Levitt, Laura;.

Subjects/Keywords: Film studies; Gender studies; American studies;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Woodworth, A. J. (2014). From Buddy Film to Bromance: Masculinity and Male Melodrama Since 1969. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,277714

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Woodworth, Amy Jean. “From Buddy Film to Bromance: Masculinity and Male Melodrama Since 1969.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 10, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,277714.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Woodworth, Amy Jean. “From Buddy Film to Bromance: Masculinity and Male Melodrama Since 1969.” 2014. Web. 10 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Woodworth AJ. From Buddy Film to Bromance: Masculinity and Male Melodrama Since 1969. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2021 May 10]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,277714.

Council of Science Editors:

Woodworth AJ. From Buddy Film to Bromance: Masculinity and Male Melodrama Since 1969. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,277714


Temple University

3. Harrison, Dana M. Realism in Pain: Literary and Social Constructions of Victorian Pain in the Age of Anaesthesia, 1846-1870.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Temple University

English

In 1846 and 1847, ether and chloroform were used and celebrated for the first time in Britain and the United States as effective surgical anaesthetics capable of rendering individuals insensible to physical pain. During the same decade, British novels of realism were enjoying increasing cultural authority, dominating readers' attention, and evoking readers' sympathy for numerous social justice issues. This dissertation investigates a previously unanswered question in studies of literature and medicine: how did writers of social realism incorporate realistic descriptions of physical pain, a notoriously difficult sensation to describe, in an era when the very idea of pain's inevitability was challenged by medical developments and when, concurrently, novelists, journalists, and politicians were concerned with humanitarian reforms to recognize traditionally ignored and disadvantaged individuals and groups in pain? By contextualizing the emergence of specific realist novels including works by Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Reade, William Howard Russell, and Charles Dickens, within larger nonfiction discourses regarding factory reform, prison reform, and war, this dissertation identifies and clarifies how realist authors, who aim to demonstrate general truths about "real life," employed various descriptions of physical pain during this watershed moment in medicine and pain theory, to convince readers of their validity as well as to awaken sympathetic politics among readers. This study analyzes Gaskell's first industrial novel, Mary Barton (1848), Reade's prison-scandal novel, It is Never Too Late to Mend (1856), Russell's Crimean War correspondence (1850s) and only novel, The Adventures of Doctor Brady (1868), and Dickens's second Bildungsroman, Great Expectations (1861), thereby revealing different strategies utilized by each author representing pain - ranging from subtle to graphic, collective to individualized, urgent to remembered, and destructive to productive. This study shows how audience expectations, political timing, authorial authority, and medical theory influence and are influenced by realist authors writing pain, as they contribute to a cultural consensus that the pain of others is unacceptable and requires attention. These realist authors must, in the end, provide fictionalized accounts of pain, asking readers to act as witnesses and to use their imaginations, in order to inspire sympathy.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Logan, Peter Melville;, Wells, Susan, Ph. D., Buurma, Rachel S., Gaycken, Oliver, Glasson, Travis;.

Subjects/Keywords: British and Irish literature; History; Ethics;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harrison, D. M. (2013). Realism in Pain: Literary and Social Constructions of Victorian Pain in the Age of Anaesthesia, 1846-1870. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216521

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harrison, Dana M. “Realism in Pain: Literary and Social Constructions of Victorian Pain in the Age of Anaesthesia, 1846-1870.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 10, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216521.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harrison, Dana M. “Realism in Pain: Literary and Social Constructions of Victorian Pain in the Age of Anaesthesia, 1846-1870.” 2013. Web. 10 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Harrison DM. Realism in Pain: Literary and Social Constructions of Victorian Pain in the Age of Anaesthesia, 1846-1870. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. [cited 2021 May 10]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216521.

Council of Science Editors:

Harrison DM. Realism in Pain: Literary and Social Constructions of Victorian Pain in the Age of Anaesthesia, 1846-1870. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216521

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