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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Ford, Talissa"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Renye, Jeffrey Michael. Panic on the British Borderlands: The Great God Pan, Victorian Sexuality, and Sacred Space in the Works of Arthur Machen.

Degree: PhD, 2012, Temple University

English

From the late Victorian period to the early twentieth century, Arthur Machen's life and his writing provide what Deleuze and Guattari argue to be the value of the minor author: Contemporary historical streams combine in Machen's fiction and non-fiction. The concerns and anxieties in the writing reflect developments in their times, and exist amid the questions incited by positivist science, sexological studies, and the dissemination and popularity of Darwin's theories and the interpretations of Social Darwinism: What is the integrity of the human body, and what are the relevance and varieties of spiritual belief. The personal and the social issues of materiality and immateriality are present in the choice of Machen's themes and the manner in which he expresses them. More specifically, Machen's use of place and his interest in numinosity, which includes the negative numinous, are the twining forces where the local and the common, and the Ideal and the esoteric, meet. His interest in Western esotericism is important because of the Victorian occult revival and the ritual magic groups' role in the development of individual psychic explorations. Occultism and the formation of ritual magic groups are a response to deep-seated cultural concerns of industrialized, urban modernity. Within the esoteric traditions, the Gnostic outlook of a fractured creation corresponds to the cosmogony of a divided cosmos and the disjointed realities that are found in Machen's late-Victorian literary horror and supernatural fiction. The Gnostic microcosm, at the local level, and the mesocosm, at the intermediary position, are at a remove from the unified providence of the greater macrocosm. The content of the texts that I will analyze demonstrates Machen's interest in the divided self (with inspiration from Robert Louis Stevenson), and those texts consider the subject of non-normative sexuality and its uncanny representations, natural and urban, as a horror that is attractive and abject – a source of fascination and a cause of disgust. The view that I state is that Machen wrote late-Victorian, post-Romantic Gothic literature that is not dependent upon either the cares of Decadence for artificiality or the disavowal of Gnosticism of the worth of mortal life and experiences in the material world. Machen's outlook is similar to Hermeticism, and like the Hermeticists he enjoyed many of the pleasures available in the world and in the narratives of ecstatic wonder that he found: the power of archetypal myth and local lore; good food and drink; travel between country and city; and close associations with friends and family, modest in number and rich in quality. The Great God Pan, The Three Impostors, or, The Transmutations, "The White People," and the autobiographies Far Off Things and Things Near and Far are the primary sources in my study. The enchantment of place and the potential and active horrors of the countryside and the city of the late Victorian and Edwardian periods inform Arthur Machen's life and his literary world. The influence…

Advisors/Committee Members: O'Hara, Daniel T., Brivic, Sheldon, Caserio, Robert L., Ford, Talissa.

Subjects/Keywords: Literature; British and Irish literature; History; Alchemy; Arthur Machen; Esotericism; Magic; Sexology; The Great God Pan

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Renye, J. M. (2012). Panic on the British Borderlands: The Great God Pan, Victorian Sexuality, and Sacred Space in the Works of Arthur Machen. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214792

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Renye, Jeffrey Michael. “Panic on the British Borderlands: The Great God Pan, Victorian Sexuality, and Sacred Space in the Works of Arthur Machen.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed July 24, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214792.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Renye, Jeffrey Michael. “Panic on the British Borderlands: The Great God Pan, Victorian Sexuality, and Sacred Space in the Works of Arthur Machen.” 2012. Web. 24 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Renye JM. Panic on the British Borderlands: The Great God Pan, Victorian Sexuality, and Sacred Space in the Works of Arthur Machen. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2019 Jul 24]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214792.

Council of Science Editors:

Renye JM. Panic on the British Borderlands: The Great God Pan, Victorian Sexuality, and Sacred Space in the Works of Arthur Machen. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214792


Temple University

2. Griffith, Joann D. "All Men are Builders": Architectural Structures in the Victorian Novel.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

English

Nineteenth-century Britain experienced a confluence of a rapidly urbanizing physical environment, radical changes in the hierarchical relationships in society as well as in the natural sciences, and a nostalgic fascination with antiquities, especially gothic architecture. The realist novels of this period reflect this tension between dramatic social restructuring and a conservative impulse to remember and maintain the world as it has been. This dissertation focuses on the word structure to unpack the implications of these opposing forces, both for our understanding of the social structures that novels reflect, and the narrative structures that novels create. To address these issues, I examine the architectural structures described in Victorian realist novels, drawing parallels with their social and narrative structures. In Charles Dickens's Little Dorrit (1855), George Eliot's Adam Bede (1859), and Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886) and Jude the Obscure (1895), descriptions of houses and barns, churches and cathedrals, shops and factories, and courthouses and schools are thematically important because they draw our attention to the novels' interest in the social structures that underlie the fictional worlds they represent. Buildings provide spaces where members of a community may work towards a shared purpose; they also embody that community's common knowledge, values, and ideals. These novels take up the thematic concern with structure through their own formal narrative structuring work. Much like an architect builds a physical structure, novels build a narrative structure by carefully arranging patterns, sequences, proportions, and perspectives. An examination of a novel's description of a building reveals moments of self-reflexive consideration of the narratives it constructs. These are moments that interrogate the building materials of narrative and how their arrangement becomes meaningful, that consider what the narrative structure can accommodate and what it excludes, and that invite us to attend to the ways in which the act of structuring a narrative situates it in time, in relation to the past, present, and future. The choices an architect makes about ornaments and materials, the way a building integrates the surrounding environment, and the way its proportions compare to a human scale, all constitute a kind of language; moreover, the way people interact with, in, and around these built spaces suggests it is a dynamic and evolving language. Preeminent Victorian art and social critic John Ruskin's architectural treatise, The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849) serves as a master key to interpreting the Victorian understanding of architectural language in the novels under investigation. Because Ruskin's writings pervaded mid-century artistic discourse, and because he turned his critical gaze on such a wide range of the mid-nineteenth century's most important aesthetic, social, philosophical, and ethical concerns, his work provides an invaluable bridge between the physical, social, and…

Advisors/Committee Members: Logan, Peter Melville;, Dolan, Therese, Ford, Talissa, Thomas, Katherine, Rappoport, Jill;.

Subjects/Keywords: British and Irish literature; Architecture; Social structure;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Griffith, J. D. (2015). "All Men are Builders": Architectural Structures in the Victorian Novel. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,316376

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Griffith, Joann D. “"All Men are Builders": Architectural Structures in the Victorian Novel.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed July 24, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,316376.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Griffith, Joann D. “"All Men are Builders": Architectural Structures in the Victorian Novel.” 2015. Web. 24 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Griffith JD. "All Men are Builders": Architectural Structures in the Victorian Novel. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 24]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,316376.

Council of Science Editors:

Griffith JD. "All Men are Builders": Architectural Structures in the Victorian Novel. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,316376


Temple University

3. Palmieri, Stephanie Jane. Assessing Industry Ideologies: Representations of Gender, Sexuality, and Sexual Violence in the Book Versions and Film Adaptations of The Hunger Games Trilogy, The Divergent Trilogy, and The Vampire Academy Series.

Degree: PhD, 2016, Temple University

Media & Communication

In this study, I use social constructionist feminist and queer theory and narrative analysis to identify messages about gender, sexuality, and sexual violence in both the book versions and film adaptations of The Hunger Games trilogy, the Divergent trilogy, and the Vampire Academy series. These three series are representative of a major pop culture trend in which young adult novels are not only popular and financially successful, but in which these types of novels are being adapted into major films. In this study, I demonstrate that the book and film series all generally privilege whiteness, able-bodiedness, and heterosexuality, and in doing so, these texts reproduce a narrow worldview and privilege normative ways of knowing and being. However, while the films strictly reinforce normative understandings of gender, sexuality, and sexual violence, each book series reimagines gender in important ways, disrupts normative scripts that denigrate women’s ownership over their sexuality, and represents sexual violence in graphic but not exploitative ways that portray the real life consequences and complexity of sexual violence. My analysis of these texts reveals that the book series employ a variety of mechanisms that empower the women protagonists including establishing their narrative agency and representing them as gender fluid, while the film series utilize a variety of mechanisms that both objectify and superficially empower women including an emphasis on women’s sexualized physical bodies especially in times of vulnerability, the pronunciation of “natural” sexual differences, and the strict regulation of women’s bodies by dominantly masculine men. I argue that the significant alteration of the books’ original messages are a product of logistical, historical, cultural, and economic elements of the film industry, which has continually constructed women’s roles in terms of their sexual availability, victimization, and need to be rescued by heroic men. In this study, I address the institutional imperatives of the film industry that dictate specific representations of gender, sexuality, and sexual violence, and I address what these representations might mean for audiences.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Fernback, Jan;, Darling-Wolf, Fabienne, Campbell, John Edward, Ford, Talissa;.

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Mass communication;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Palmieri, S. J. (2016). Assessing Industry Ideologies: Representations of Gender, Sexuality, and Sexual Violence in the Book Versions and Film Adaptations of The Hunger Games Trilogy, The Divergent Trilogy, and The Vampire Academy Series. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,416269

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Palmieri, Stephanie Jane. “Assessing Industry Ideologies: Representations of Gender, Sexuality, and Sexual Violence in the Book Versions and Film Adaptations of The Hunger Games Trilogy, The Divergent Trilogy, and The Vampire Academy Series.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed July 24, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,416269.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Palmieri, Stephanie Jane. “Assessing Industry Ideologies: Representations of Gender, Sexuality, and Sexual Violence in the Book Versions and Film Adaptations of The Hunger Games Trilogy, The Divergent Trilogy, and The Vampire Academy Series.” 2016. Web. 24 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Palmieri SJ. Assessing Industry Ideologies: Representations of Gender, Sexuality, and Sexual Violence in the Book Versions and Film Adaptations of The Hunger Games Trilogy, The Divergent Trilogy, and The Vampire Academy Series. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jul 24]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,416269.

Council of Science Editors:

Palmieri SJ. Assessing Industry Ideologies: Representations of Gender, Sexuality, and Sexual Violence in the Book Versions and Film Adaptations of The Hunger Games Trilogy, The Divergent Trilogy, and The Vampire Academy Series. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2016. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,416269

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