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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Ershkowitz, Herbert"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Mullan, Michael Leigh. Opposition, Discipline and Culture: The Civic World of the Irish and Italians in Philadelphia, 1880-1920.

Degree: PhD, 2009, Temple University

History

One of the stock assumptions that inhabits our understanding of the history of 19th- and early 20th-century immigration to an industrializing America is the wretchedness of the new immigrant laborers. The waves of new Americans from impoverished rural zones of emigration that swept into the nation were thought to be simple, rural people of limited skill for an advanced economy, unschooled in the norms of civic life, ignorant of democratic processes. Oscar Handlin was the original architect of this view; he saw the new ethnic groups as unsophisticated pre-moderns, and, as "peasants, they had not the background or skills to make their way in the economy of the New World." Whatever progress the new ethnic groups achieved in cultural and civic matters was attributable to learning and adapting to American influence, a process of assimilation that instilled social discipline in personal and public life and an appreciation for American democracy. This study challenges this assumption and relocates the locus of investigation overseas, to transnational sources of civic life in the pre-emigration lands of Ireland and South/Central Italy to explain the rapid rise and proliferation of ethnic voluntary associations in the late 1800s, early 1900s. The empirical universe is the Irish and Italians of Philadelphia; the time frame is 1880-1920, and the social site of investigation and analysis is the vibrant community life of ethnic voluntary associations the Irish and Italians constructed. This study also challenges a reading of the Irish associations in Philadelphia as little more than neighborhood clubs peopled by an aspiring upper strata of the Irish American community reaching for bourgeois values. This work suggests that the associations were populated by the working class, many born in Ireland, that substituted an ethic of solidarity for individual achievement values, a communal opposition to symbols of past oppression and agents of privilege. The Irish Americans of Philadelphia had cultural advantages prior to emigration, and they capitalized on this stock of common knowledge absorbed in native Ireland to transfer the norms, methods and moral codes of behavior from the Irish Friendly Society to the Irish American Beneficial Association of Philadelphia. However closely the Irish of Philadelphia followed the original transatlantic model, they ultimately molded their own style of ethnic association that elevated humanitarian communal values and constructed their civic life on a scaffolding of stable financial reasoning backed by a solid group discipline. The region of Abruzzo in South/Central Italy sent a disproportionate share of its rural people to Philadelphia in a massive chain migration that formed the Italian colony of South Philadelphia in the early 1900s. The Abruzzesse were a mountainous people defined by their rocky hilltop topography and a hard heritage derived from eking out an existence working rocky soil or shepherding; this was a mobile population cultured in the tradition of seasonal migration…

Advisors/Committee Members: Ershkowitz, Herbert, Jenkins, Wilbert L., Simon, Bryant, Goode, Judith.

Subjects/Keywords: History, United States; Civic Associations; Philadelphia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mullan, M. L. (2009). Opposition, Discipline and Culture: The Civic World of the Irish and Italians in Philadelphia, 1880-1920. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,72117

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mullan, Michael Leigh. “Opposition, Discipline and Culture: The Civic World of the Irish and Italians in Philadelphia, 1880-1920.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,72117.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mullan, Michael Leigh. “Opposition, Discipline and Culture: The Civic World of the Irish and Italians in Philadelphia, 1880-1920.” 2009. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Mullan ML. Opposition, Discipline and Culture: The Civic World of the Irish and Italians in Philadelphia, 1880-1920. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,72117.

Council of Science Editors:

Mullan ML. Opposition, Discipline and Culture: The Civic World of the Irish and Italians in Philadelphia, 1880-1920. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,72117


Temple University

2. Sidorick, Sharon McConnell. Silk Stockings and Socialism: Class, Community, and Labor Feminism in Kensington, Philadelphia, 1919-1940.

Degree: PhD, 2010, Temple University

History

Between 1919 and the establishment of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), Kensington's American Federation of Hosiery Workers (AFHW) built a remarkable movement for social justice in Philadelphia, that played an important role in the establishment of the CIO, the New Deal, and labor-based feminism. Most historical accounts have portrayed the years following World War I through the early 1930s as a period of reversals and apathy for both the labor and women's movements. Fractured by factionalism, racial and ethnic conflict, and government repression, it would not be until the Great Depression, and within the "culture of unity" of the CIO and New Deal, that this "doldrums" would be overcome enough to spark a revived labor movement and a "labor" feminism that emerged in the late 1940s and 1950s. The roots of the social movements of the 1930s and beyond are, however, longer and much more complex. In several places, working-class men and women continued to advance throughout the period of perceived "doldrums." In fact, the 1920s and early 1930s were a period of organizing, education, and network building that laid the groundwork for the later movements. This dissertation uses the AFHW and Kensington as a lens to examine these developments. A left-wing-Socialist-led union, the hosiery workers developed a subculture of radicalism that drew on the long working-class traditions of the textile unions of the community of Kensington. Representing an industry whose very product, silk full-fashioned hosiery, epitomized the "flapper," the union developed a movement that celebrated – and subverted – the 1920s "New Woman" and the culture of the Jazz Age youth rebellion. Hosiery workers developed a romantic, rights-based movement that promoted class solidarity across differences of age, ethnicity, race, and gender. Over the course of a campaign to organize the industry and rebuild labor, the AFHW developed a heroic movement that utilized pathbreaking female-centered imagery and propelled women and the union onto the national consciousness. Their activities put them in the forefront of a movement for social democracy and led in direct ways to the CIO, the New Deal, and labor feminism.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Kusmer, Kenneth L., Ershkowitz, Herbert, Klepp, Susan E., Halpern, Rick.

Subjects/Keywords: History, United States; Women's Studies; Hosiery; Kensington; Labor; Philadelphia; Women; Working Class

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sidorick, S. M. (2010). Silk Stockings and Socialism: Class, Community, and Labor Feminism in Kensington, Philadelphia, 1919-1940. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,90295

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sidorick, Sharon McConnell. “Silk Stockings and Socialism: Class, Community, and Labor Feminism in Kensington, Philadelphia, 1919-1940.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,90295.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sidorick, Sharon McConnell. “Silk Stockings and Socialism: Class, Community, and Labor Feminism in Kensington, Philadelphia, 1919-1940.” 2010. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Sidorick SM. Silk Stockings and Socialism: Class, Community, and Labor Feminism in Kensington, Philadelphia, 1919-1940. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,90295.

Council of Science Editors:

Sidorick SM. Silk Stockings and Socialism: Class, Community, and Labor Feminism in Kensington, Philadelphia, 1919-1940. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,90295

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