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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Ericksen, Eugene;"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Pittaoulis, Melissa Anastasia. Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future.

Degree: PhD, 2012, Temple University

Sociology

This dissertation examines the strategies that students use for navigating their way through college and the steps they take in preparation for college graduation. I wrote this dissertation because I wanted to understand how students go from being freshmen not long out of high school to young adults prepared (or not prepared) to enter the workforce or attend graduate or professional school. Past research has found that as high school students, many young people are generally directionless when it comes to learning about different career paths (Schneider and Stevenson 2006). Moreover, in the U.S., there is very little structural support for helping students navigate the transition from student to worker. While universities may offer programs that can aid students in finding jobs or applying to graduate schools, it is largely up to students to seek these programs out. This dissertation therefore investigates the question, "How much do college students plan for their post-college lives?" To accomplish my research goals, I focus on two areas in which students may demonstrate planfulness: choosing a college major and planning for post-graduation careers or schooling. I seek to answer three general questions. First, what reasons do students give for attending college? Second, how planful are students when selecting their college majors? Third, how planful are students in preparing for their future educational and occupational goals? To answer these questions, I collected my own data using a mixed methodology research design that included in-depth interviews with 31 students and a survey of nearly 500 college seniors at a large, northeastern university. This study adds to the literature on the transition to adulthood by studying the school-to-work transition. It also contributes to the sociology of education literature by shedding light on how college students make decisions about college majors. The survey shows that many students simultaneously hold both utilitarian and liberal arts philosophies toward higher education. The majority of survey respondents reported that they were motivated to attend college because of both the extrinsic and intrinsic rewards that a college education offers. Meanwhile, the in-depth interviews suggest that parental expectations, which were also commonly cited by survey respondents as reasons for attending college, are very powerful influences in students' decisions to attend college. Regarding college major choices, the survey results suggest that students find school experience more influential than the prospects of a potential career. In total, about two-thirds of respondents gave "present-oriented" rather than "future-oriented" reasons for choosing their majors. When looking at individual reasons for selecting a major, I found that passion for or interest in a subject was by far the reason cited most often as most important. The in-depth interview data provide further insight into the relationship between college majors and post-graduation plans. These interviews show that it…

Advisors/Committee Members: Ericksen, Eugene, Grasmuck, Sherri, Goyette, Kimberly A., Joslyn, Richard.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; Sociology of education; college majors; college students; planfulness; post-graduation plans; transition to adulthood

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pittaoulis, M. A. (2012). Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,204404

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pittaoulis, Melissa Anastasia. “Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 06, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,204404.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pittaoulis, Melissa Anastasia. “Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future.” 2012. Web. 06 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Pittaoulis MA. Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2021 May 06]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,204404.

Council of Science Editors:

Pittaoulis MA. Getting through School: A Study of How Students Select their College Majors and Plan for the Future. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,204404


Temple University

2. Hilbert, Aubrey Jeanne. Blinded by the Right: Liberalism among Black Christian Conservatives.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Temple University

Sociology

In 2012, President Barack Obama was elected to a second term amidst concerns that his support of same-sex marriage would deter conservative African American voters. Rather, for the first time on record, the share of Black voters surpassed the share of White voters in the general electorate (File 2012). This seemingly paradoxical relationship, for conservative Black voters to support Obama while denouncing gay marriage, has yet to lead to any serious scholarly investigation. Instead, past research on religion and party alignment has focused primarily on the White Christian Right. Political sociologists, therefore, possess a better understanding of the correlation between White Christian conservatism and political conservatism. Meanwhile, not only are explorations into how Christian conservatism affects Black voter alignment scarce, but also, these investigations rarely isolate Black Christian conservatives from the general Black electorate. The current political climate complicates the relationship between race, religion, and politics considerably. The election of Barack Obama has symbolized to some that the American electorate exists within a post-racial environment. Accusations to the contrary have focused on supporters of the Tea Party, a movement that formed on the premise of anti-government interventionism. This highly conservative coalition has dictated the Republican Party's shift to the right, much like the "Moral Majority" in decades past. Similar to its religious predecessor, the Tea Party advocates conservative stances on abortion and gay rights. However, just as the White Christian Right consists almost entirely of White members, so too does the Tea Party. The current study examines Black Christian conservatives' political decision-making. The focus of this research is on Black Christian conservatives. However, in order to explain the environment in which Black voters must operate, I also study White Christian conservatives' political motivations. Thus, I ask, what motivates Black Christian conservatives to align with the Democratic Party despite their conservative political and religious ideologies? I explore three well-known explanations for why Black conservative voters may align with Democrats over Republicans. The first is redistributive policy support, which considers the longstanding espousal of fiscal liberalism among Black voters. Next, racial resentment investigates whether conservative Whites are antagonistic to Black voters' concerns. Finally, religious philosophy examines how Black Christian conservatives apply their religion to their political viewpoints. Each analysis chapter employs data that can directly address the following questions. First, how does Christian conservatism affect White and Black voters' support for various government initiatives? Second, does racial resentment contribute more to Whites' support of the Tea Party, or rather, does that support stem from fiscal and/or Christian conservatism? Finally, given that roughly 90 percent of the Black…

Advisors/Committee Members: Ericksen, Eugene;, Wray, Matt, Arceneaux, Kevin, Kolodny, Robin.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; Political Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hilbert, A. J. (2013). Blinded by the Right: Liberalism among Black Christian Conservatives. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216573

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hilbert, Aubrey Jeanne. “Blinded by the Right: Liberalism among Black Christian Conservatives.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 06, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216573.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hilbert, Aubrey Jeanne. “Blinded by the Right: Liberalism among Black Christian Conservatives.” 2013. Web. 06 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Hilbert AJ. Blinded by the Right: Liberalism among Black Christian Conservatives. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. [cited 2021 May 06]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216573.

Council of Science Editors:

Hilbert AJ. Blinded by the Right: Liberalism among Black Christian Conservatives. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,216573


Temple University

3. Barlas, Frances M. Investigating The Dual Mortgage Market: The Distribution Of Subprime Lending By Race And Its Consequences For Minority Communities.

Degree: PhD, 2009, Temple University

Sociology

This dissertation examines the overlap of the racial composition of a neighborhood and the existence of a dual mortgage market in which prime and subprime lenders serve different neighborhoods and borrowers. Does subprime lending represent the democratization of credit or does it serve to track people by race? This dissertation employs Home Mortgage Disclosure Act Data, U.S. Census Data and the HUD Subprime Lender List to identify subprime loans. I use Hierarchical Linear Modeling to predict the likelihood of subprime for a borrower in Philadelphia, Baltimore, San Francisco and Alameda County California. The findings demonstrate that blacks and borrowers in black neighborhoods have a higher likelihood of originating a subprime loan than whites or borrowers in white neighborhoods. Further, blacks borrowing in largely white neighborhoods have an even higher likelihood of originating a subprime loan compared to their white neighbors than do blacks borrowing in largely black neighborhoods. These findings indicate that subprime lenders not only serve different neighborhoods, but also different borrowers regardless of the neighborhood in which they are borrowing and support the existence of a dual mortgage market that is defined by race. The results from the analysis examining the consequences of subprime lending for neighborhoods indicate that after controlling for neighborhood characteristics, the positive relationship between earlier and later rates of subprime lending disappears. Also, while higher rates of subprime refinance lending were associated with a decrease in neighborhood median income in 2000, subprime lending was associated with positive changes in median house value and percent of homeowners that are black in the neighborhood, although the effects of subprime on median house value disappeared after controlling for neighborhood conditions. The study points to the continued difficulties that black borrowers and borrowers in black neighborhoods face in obtaining a fair loan. As lending practices are reformed, it is important to keep in mind the need to ensure that minority borrowers who are in the position to afford a home loan maintain the ability to get a loan, but increased care must be taken to ensure that they obtain the ability to do so on fair terms.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Ericksen, Eugene, Shlay, Anne B., Elesh, David, Adams, Carolyn Teich.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies; Urban and Regional Planning; HLM; housing; lending; mortgage; race; subprime

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barlas, F. M. (2009). Investigating The Dual Mortgage Market: The Distribution Of Subprime Lending By Race And Its Consequences For Minority Communities. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,55002

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barlas, Frances M. “Investigating The Dual Mortgage Market: The Distribution Of Subprime Lending By Race And Its Consequences For Minority Communities.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 06, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,55002.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barlas, Frances M. “Investigating The Dual Mortgage Market: The Distribution Of Subprime Lending By Race And Its Consequences For Minority Communities.” 2009. Web. 06 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Barlas FM. Investigating The Dual Mortgage Market: The Distribution Of Subprime Lending By Race And Its Consequences For Minority Communities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. [cited 2021 May 06]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,55002.

Council of Science Editors:

Barlas FM. Investigating The Dual Mortgage Market: The Distribution Of Subprime Lending By Race And Its Consequences For Minority Communities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,55002

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