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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Dodds, Sherril;"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Krtolica, Marija. The Embodiment of the Unconscious, Hysteria, Surrealism, and Tanztheater.

Degree: PhD, 2018, Temple University

Dance

The primary subject of this dissertation is mental illness and performance of the hysterical symptom as they were investigated by the Swedish choreographer Mats Ek (Giselle, 1982), Tanztheater (from 1975-1979), and Second Wave Feminism. Historically, the examination begins in the nineteenth century, with the staging of madness in the romantic ballet Giselle (1841), and medical showings at Salpêtrière (1870s). The historical sites point to the interweaving of medical and dance cultures, and to a tendency towards pathologization of idiosyncratic movement expression within nineteenth century discourses on heredity, degeneration, and female health. To historically probe the ways in which twentieth century concert dance commented on pathologization of femininity, female performative labor, and expressive movement, the examination extends to: the fin-de-siècle café-concert scene; psychoanalytic sessions of 1890s, in which dancing played a role in both diagnosis and treatment; Nijinsky’s dance modernism as seen in Le Sacre du Printemps (1913); the anti-psychiatry within the post-1st World War Surrealism, and the post-2nd World War psychologically inflected choreographies by Antony Tudor, Martha Graham, Donya Feuer and Paul Sanasardo. The performance sites are investigated in relationship to the concepts of the unconscious, trauma, hysteria, hystericization, symptom, and expression. The dissertation proposes that late nineteenth century hysteria gained emancipatory meanings in the theoretical work of twentieth century dance scholarship, feminism, cultural criticism, and Freudian-Lacanian psychoanalysis. On the side of practice, Tanztheater participated in reclaiming hysteria. The Rite of Spring (1975), Bluebeard (1977), Café Müller (1978), and Arien (1979) explored traumatic memory, and male/female relationships in context of the post-2nd World War consumerist culture. I examine Pina Bausch’s and Mats Ek’s choreographies in dialogue with the contemporary theory to show that dance spectatorship can bring about an understanding of how the residues of political and personal past shape the experiences of the present.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Franko, Mark;, Dodds, Sherril, Gjesdal, Kristin, Ruprecht, Lucia;.

Subjects/Keywords: Dance; Performing arts; Psychology;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Krtolica, M. (2018). The Embodiment of the Unconscious, Hysteria, Surrealism, and Tanztheater. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,516449

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Krtolica, Marija. “The Embodiment of the Unconscious, Hysteria, Surrealism, and Tanztheater.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 22, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,516449.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Krtolica, Marija. “The Embodiment of the Unconscious, Hysteria, Surrealism, and Tanztheater.” 2018. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Krtolica M. The Embodiment of the Unconscious, Hysteria, Surrealism, and Tanztheater. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,516449.

Council of Science Editors:

Krtolica M. The Embodiment of the Unconscious, Hysteria, Surrealism, and Tanztheater. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,516449


Temple University

2. Hooper, Colleen. Public Movement: Dancers and the Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA) 1974-1982.

Degree: PhD, 2016, Temple University

Dance

For eight years, dancers in the United States performed and taught as employees of the federal government. They were eligible for the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), a Department of Labor program that assisted the unemployed during the recession of the late 1970s. Dance primarily occurred in artistic or leisure contexts, and employing dancers as federal government workers shifted dance to a labor context. CETA dancers performed “public service” in senior centers, hospitals, prisons, public parks, and community centers. Through a combination of archival research, qualitative interviews, and philosophical framing, I address how CETA disrupted public spaces and forced dancers and audiences to reconsider how representation functions in performance. I argue that CETA supported dance as public service while local programs had latitude regarding how they defined dance as public service. Part 1 is entitled Intersections: Dance, Labor, and Public Art and it provides the historical and political context necessary to understand how CETA arts programs came to fruition in the 1970s. It details how CETA arts programs relate to the history of U.S. federal arts funding and labor programs. I highlight how John Kreidler initiated the first CETA arts program in San Francisco, California, and detail the national scope of arts programming. In Part 2 of this dissertation, CETA in the Field: Dancers and Administrators, I focus on case studies from the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and New York, New York CETA arts programs to illustrate the range of how dance was conceived and performed as public service. CETA dancers were called upon to produce “public dance” which entailed federal funding, free performances in public spaces, and imagining a public that would comprise their audiences. By acknowledging artists and performers as workers who could perform public service, CETA was instrumental in shifting artists’ identities from rebellious outsiders to service economy laborers who wanted to be part of society. CETA arts programs reenacted Works Progress Administration (WPA) arts programs from the 1930s and adapted these ideas of artists as public servants into the Post-Fordist, service economy of the 1970s United States. CETA dancers became bureaucrats responsible for negotiating their work environments and this entailed a number of administrative duties. While this made it challenging for dancers to manage their basic schedules and material needs, it also allowed for a degree of flexibility, schedule gaps, and opportunities to create new performance and teaching situations. By funding dance as public service, CETA arts programs staged a macroeconomic intervention into the dance field that redefined dance as public service.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Dodds, Sherril;, Welsh-Asante, Kariamu, Franko, Mark, Sweet, Elizabeth, Goedde, Petra;.

Subjects/Keywords: Dance; History; American history;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hooper, C. (2016). Public Movement: Dancers and the Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA) 1974-1982. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,372703

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hooper, Colleen. “Public Movement: Dancers and the Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA) 1974-1982.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 22, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,372703.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hooper, Colleen. “Public Movement: Dancers and the Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA) 1974-1982.” 2016. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Hooper C. Public Movement: Dancers and the Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA) 1974-1982. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2016. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,372703.

Council of Science Editors:

Hooper C. Public Movement: Dancers and the Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA) 1974-1982. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2016. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,372703


Temple University

3. DiLodovico, Amanda. Choreographies of Disablement.

Degree: PhD, 2017, Temple University

Dance

Choreographies of Disablement interrogates the historical relationship between dance and disability to recognize and define ‘disablement’ as a choreographic concept within contemporary dance practice. Working from choreographic analysis, interviews, and theories of sovereignty and crip time I argue ‘disablement’ grows out of the historical nexus in which Western concert dance, through the paradigm of ballet, was cultivated: the seventeenth century French political sphere and the prestige of a sovereign balletomane King. The performances of French kings in the burlesque ballet choreographies of 1624-1627 serve as the historical center of this research because disability has a political role to play at the dawn of concert dance in the West. This insight provides the historical perspective from which I locate the development of ‘disablement’ in the seventeenth century and identify its emergence in twenty-first century choreographies. This dissertation uses the historical and political significance of the burlesque ballets as a touchstone to then analyze three contemporary sites of choreography produced between 2004 and 2016. Chapter 3 considers the repertory of German choreographer Raimund Hoghe, a queer disabled artist. I focus attention on his piece Sacre – The Rite of Spring (2004), which draws upon dance’s historical, canonical past. Chapter 4 focuses on Disabled Theater (2012), devised by French choreographer Jérôme Bel in collaboration with the Swiss-based company Theater Hora, a professional theater company comprised of performers with developmental disabilities. The piece is composed of theatrical tasks, including the presentation of self-choreographed dance solos. Chapter 5 centers on the collaborative performance work, A Fierce Kind of Love (2016), comprised of Philadelphia-based disabled and nondisabled performers with choreography by US dance artist Nichole Canuso. Taken together, my analysis of these sites questions the state of disability within the discursive space of dance studies, and in turn positions ‘disablement’ as a historically inflected site of choreographic thinking materializing in contemporary practice.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Franko, Mark;, Bond, Karen E., Dodds, Sherril, Walters, Shannon, Giersdorf, Jens Richard;.

Subjects/Keywords: Dance; Disability studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

DiLodovico, A. (2017). Choreographies of Disablement. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,479157

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

DiLodovico, Amanda. “Choreographies of Disablement.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 22, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,479157.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

DiLodovico, Amanda. “Choreographies of Disablement.” 2017. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

DiLodovico A. Choreographies of Disablement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,479157.

Council of Science Editors:

DiLodovico A. Choreographies of Disablement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,479157

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