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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Dhanasekaran, Danny"). Showing records 1 – 4 of 4 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Goldsmith, Zachariah G. Oncogenic Signaling Pathways Activated by Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) in Ovarian Carcinoma.

Degree: PhD, 2009, Temple University

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Ovarian cancer is currently the most fatal gynecologic cancer and the fifth leading cause of fatal cancer in women overall. As… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology, Molecular; Health Sciences, Oncology; ERK; G alpha 12; JNK; LPA; lysophosphatidic acid; ovarian cancer

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APA (6th Edition):

Goldsmith, Z. G. (2009). Oncogenic Signaling Pathways Activated by Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) in Ovarian Carcinoma. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,34336

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goldsmith, Zachariah G. “Oncogenic Signaling Pathways Activated by Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) in Ovarian Carcinoma.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,34336.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goldsmith, Zachariah G. “Oncogenic Signaling Pathways Activated by Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) in Ovarian Carcinoma.” 2009. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Goldsmith ZG. Oncogenic Signaling Pathways Activated by Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) in Ovarian Carcinoma. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,34336.

Council of Science Editors:

Goldsmith ZG. Oncogenic Signaling Pathways Activated by Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) in Ovarian Carcinoma. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,34336


Temple University

2. Gardner, Jacob Andrew. GPCR Signaling in the Genesis and Progression of Pancreatic Cancer.

Degree: PhD, 2009, Temple University

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas are the 4th most common cause of cancer death. The 1 and 5 year survival rates… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology, Molecular; G alpha 13; GPCR; LPA; lysophosphatidic acid; Migration; Pancreatic Cancer

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gardner, J. A. (2009). GPCR Signaling in the Genesis and Progression of Pancreatic Cancer. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,35453

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gardner, Jacob Andrew. “GPCR Signaling in the Genesis and Progression of Pancreatic Cancer.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,35453.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gardner, Jacob Andrew. “GPCR Signaling in the Genesis and Progression of Pancreatic Cancer.” 2009. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Gardner JA. GPCR Signaling in the Genesis and Progression of Pancreatic Cancer. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,35453.

Council of Science Editors:

Gardner JA. GPCR Signaling in the Genesis and Progression of Pancreatic Cancer. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,35453


Temple University

3. Happel, Christine. Molecular Basis for Mu-Opioid Regulation of Chemokine Gene Expression.

Degree: PhD, 2009, Temple University

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Opioid receptor modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production is vital for host defense and the inflammatory response. Previous results have shown the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology, Microbiology; Chemokines; NF-kappaB; Opioid; Opioid receptor; PKC

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Happel, C. (2009). Molecular Basis for Mu-Opioid Regulation of Chemokine Gene Expression. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,28438

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Happel, Christine. “Molecular Basis for Mu-Opioid Regulation of Chemokine Gene Expression.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,28438.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Happel, Christine. “Molecular Basis for Mu-Opioid Regulation of Chemokine Gene Expression.” 2009. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Happel C. Molecular Basis for Mu-Opioid Regulation of Chemokine Gene Expression. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,28438.

Council of Science Editors:

Happel C. Molecular Basis for Mu-Opioid Regulation of Chemokine Gene Expression. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,28438


Temple University

4. Albano, Jennifer Nicole. Localization of Human Prostaglandin E2 Receptors in Polarized Epithelial Cells.

Degree: PhD, 2008, Temple University

Pharmacology

The underlying mechanisms of protein sorting in polarized epithelial cells are poorly understood. Several studies have determined membrane targeting of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Health Sciences, Pharmacology; Biology, Molecular

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Albano, J. N. (2008). Localization of Human Prostaglandin E2 Receptors in Polarized Epithelial Cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,17898

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Albano, Jennifer Nicole. “Localization of Human Prostaglandin E2 Receptors in Polarized Epithelial Cells.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,17898.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Albano, Jennifer Nicole. “Localization of Human Prostaglandin E2 Receptors in Polarized Epithelial Cells.” 2008. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Albano JN. Localization of Human Prostaglandin E2 Receptors in Polarized Epithelial Cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2008. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,17898.

Council of Science Editors:

Albano JN. Localization of Human Prostaglandin E2 Receptors in Polarized Epithelial Cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2008. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,17898

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