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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Delalic, Zdenka J.;"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Nguyen, Son Truong. MULTIPLE GAS SENSING DEVICE BASED ON NANO-POROUS STRUCTURE OF ZEOLITE COATED WITH NILE RED DYE.

Degree: PhD, 2011, Temple University

Electrical Engineering

Gas detection is vital in different fields including environmental applications, clinical analysis, and homeland security. To perform these tasks the sensors need to be stable, sensitive, selective, operating at room temperature, rapidly responding, and easy to regenerate. On the other hand, most chemical sensors often suffer from a lack of selectivity, i.e., reacting more or less similarly to a collection of substances. As a result, these sensors may lead to false alerts. Even worse, the molecules to be detected could be masked by some interfering compounds which may result in failure to detect the targets. The goal of this research is to develop a portable gas-sensing device that integrates a zeolite/dye unit with an optoelectronic detector. At nano-scale the sensor is expected to be more accurate, more sensitive, and can better differentiate and detect one chemical component in a mixture of different gases. This could be achieved by incorporating fluorescent dyes into the zeolites' cavities, measuring gas absorption, desorption and photo-chromic interaction of dye and gases, interfacing the zeolite/dye sensor arrays with light source and electronic detectors and fully integrating the sensor arrays into a portable unit. This research addresses many of the above-sated threads. The highly fluorescent organic dye, nile red, was successfully included in the supercages of different zeolites Y (ammonium Y, hydrogen Y, and sodium Y) via chemical reaction. The research also developed an effective method to clean the synthesized inclusions, which is a combination of ultrasound and centrifuge. The cleaned inclusions were baked to remove any gases and/or moisture trapped inside the zeolites' structure. The spectra of the baked inclusions were used as references. The cleaned inclusions were optically characterized in terms of light absorption and fluorescence emission. When exposed to acetone, ethanol, methanol, and de-ionized water, the fluorescence emission spectra of zeolite-sodium-Y/nile-red inclusion showed a similar spectral shift compared to the reference spectrum. On the other hand, the fluorescence emission spectra of zeolite-hydrogen-Y/nile-red inclusion and zeolite-ammonium-Y/nile-red inclusion showed different spectral shifts compared to the reference spectra. This shows the successful proof of encapsulating the nile red dye in zeolites Y's cages, cleaning the zeolite/nile-red combinations, and measuring the desorption and fluorescence emission of the combinations. The optical characteristics of the nile red adsorbing to the external surface of the zeolites Y were studied as well. The research also included the design of the optical system to excite the sensing elements (zeolite/nile-red inclusions), and to collect the fluorescence response, the design and simulation of electronic circuits to condition and process electrical signal, and overall design of an integrated gas detector onto a pressed ceramic optical bench.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Delalic, Zdenka J., Kargbo, David M., Sheffield, Joel B., Silage, Dennis, Bai, Li.

Subjects/Keywords: Electrical engineering; gas sensor; nile red; zeolite Y

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nguyen, S. T. (2011). MULTIPLE GAS SENSING DEVICE BASED ON NANO-POROUS STRUCTURE OF ZEOLITE COATED WITH NILE RED DYE. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,193802

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nguyen, Son Truong. “MULTIPLE GAS SENSING DEVICE BASED ON NANO-POROUS STRUCTURE OF ZEOLITE COATED WITH NILE RED DYE.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed October 22, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,193802.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nguyen, Son Truong. “MULTIPLE GAS SENSING DEVICE BASED ON NANO-POROUS STRUCTURE OF ZEOLITE COATED WITH NILE RED DYE.” 2011. Web. 22 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Nguyen ST. MULTIPLE GAS SENSING DEVICE BASED ON NANO-POROUS STRUCTURE OF ZEOLITE COATED WITH NILE RED DYE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,193802.

Council of Science Editors:

Nguyen ST. MULTIPLE GAS SENSING DEVICE BASED ON NANO-POROUS STRUCTURE OF ZEOLITE COATED WITH NILE RED DYE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,193802


Temple University

2. Conklin, Chris J. Spatially Selective 2D RF Inner Field of View (iFOV) Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) of the Pediatric Spinal Cord.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Electrical Engineering

Magnetic resonance based diffusion imaging has been gaining more utility and clinical relevance over the past decade. Using conventional echo planar techniques it is possible to acquire and characterize water diffusion within the central nervous system (CNS); namely in the form of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). While each modality provides valuable clinical information in terms of the presence of diffusion, DWI, and its directionality, DTI, the techniques used for analysis are limited to assuming an ideal Gaussian distribution for water displacement with no intermolecular interactions. This assumption reduces the amount of relevant information that can be interpreted in a clinical setting. By measuring the excess kurtosis, or peakedness, of the Gaussian distribution it is possible to get a better understanding of the underlying cellular structure. The objective of this work is to provide mathematical and experimental evidence that Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) can provide additional information about the micromolecular environment of the pediatric spinal cord by more completely characterizing the probabilistic nature of random water displacement. A novel DKI imaging sequence based on a 2D spatially selective radio frequency pulse providing reduced FOV imaging with view angle tilting (VAT) was implemented, optimized on a 3Tesla MRI scanner, and tested on pediatric subjects (normal:15; patients with spinal cord injury:5). Software was developed and validated in-house for post processing of the DKI images and estimation of the tensor parameters. The results show statistically significant differences in kurtosis parameters (mean kurtosis, axial kurtosis) between normal and patients. DKI provides incremental and new information over conventional diffusion acquisitions that can be integrated into clinical protocols when coupled with higher order estimation algorithms.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Delalic, Zdenka J.;, Mohamed, Feroze B., Faro, Scott H., Raunig, David L.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Engineering; Medical imaging and radiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Conklin, C. J. (2015). Spatially Selective 2D RF Inner Field of View (iFOV) Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) of the Pediatric Spinal Cord. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,333691

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Conklin, Chris J. “Spatially Selective 2D RF Inner Field of View (iFOV) Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) of the Pediatric Spinal Cord.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed October 22, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,333691.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Conklin, Chris J. “Spatially Selective 2D RF Inner Field of View (iFOV) Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) of the Pediatric Spinal Cord.” 2015. Web. 22 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Conklin CJ. Spatially Selective 2D RF Inner Field of View (iFOV) Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) of the Pediatric Spinal Cord. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,333691.

Council of Science Editors:

Conklin CJ. Spatially Selective 2D RF Inner Field of View (iFOV) Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) of the Pediatric Spinal Cord. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,333691

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