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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Creech, Brian;"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Kim, Jennifer. The Merits of a Fool: Contending with Race and Racism through Sketch Comedy from the 1960s to the 2000s.

Degree: PhD, 2015, Temple University

Sociology

Studying social movements is one way to understand social change. The historical timing of their appearance and the ways they are similar and different from previous social movements is an excellent method for capturing localized salient concerns and the course of societal responses to systems of inequality over time. Another social arena, often undervalued in traditional sociological studies on systems of inequality and their related societal responses, also exists built for the emergence of social confrontations with the status quo. Whether as a psychological release valve, as a method to strengthen positions of dominance, or as a social position to voice criticisms too hot for everyday interaction, the mutability of comedy serves to encourage the emergence of relegated perspectives. There is a great deal of truth to saying a joke is never just a joke. Of course not without consequences, the significance of comedic instances is tempered by its temporal nature and the inherent ambiguity of interpretation. Incidentally, both of these qualities are also what gives comedy freedom from operating social norms of decorum and also allows for opportunities to confront these social norms. It should not be surprising that totalitarian regimes outlaw any practice of comedy, while the most democratic of nations, still riddled with racism, can claim a rich history of comedic challenges to race ideology. It is most likely for this reason that recurring characters like Luther, President Obama¡¦s ¡§anger translator¡¨ on Key and Peele even exist. Luther is the President¡¦s alter ego who performs and personifies all of the emotions the first non-white president must presumably feel, but is prevented from expressing, especially in relation to the trappings of contemporary racial logic. The main point here is to take a closer look at these seemingly strange bedfellows ¡V comedy and race ¡V and to consider these humorous proclamations against race and racism as types of momentary, but constant, social protest. Using popular commentary as a measure of controversy that is widely known, the most controversial sketch comedy shows in each decade from the 1960s to the 2000s were selected and analyzed. Additionally, all other sketch comedy shows that aired at the same time for each show were analyzed, leading to a more complex depiction of racial politics in the U.S. over five decades. Examining race through comedy lends itself to seeing racial dynamics from the edge and through the lens of social critics who possess wider degrees of discursive and performative acceptability. The story they tell confirms their critical social importance and their unique encounter with prevailing issues of race and racism. This study examines contemporary "fools" and how they resist, challenge, and transform race ideology. In order to capture the landscape of each show and to identify variations across the show, basic demographic characteristics will be collected through pre-established categorical determinations. As the primary level of…

Advisors/Committee Members: Kidd, Dustin;, Wray, Matt, Zhao, Shanyang, Creech, Brian;.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kim, J. (2015). The Merits of a Fool: Contending with Race and Racism through Sketch Comedy from the 1960s to the 2000s. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,320730

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Jennifer. “The Merits of a Fool: Contending with Race and Racism through Sketch Comedy from the 1960s to the 2000s.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,320730.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Jennifer. “The Merits of a Fool: Contending with Race and Racism through Sketch Comedy from the 1960s to the 2000s.” 2015. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Kim J. The Merits of a Fool: Contending with Race and Racism through Sketch Comedy from the 1960s to the 2000s. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,320730.

Council of Science Editors:

Kim J. The Merits of a Fool: Contending with Race and Racism through Sketch Comedy from the 1960s to the 2000s. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2015. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,320730


Temple University

2. Larrosa Fuentes, Juan S. Communication and the Body Politic: Hillary Clinton’s 2016 Presidential Campaign in Philadelphia’s Latino Community.

Degree: PhD, 2018, Temple University

Media & Communication

This dissertation contains a qualitative case study of how Hillary Clinton, the Democratic candidate, and her staff, created communication systems to contact Latinos during the 2016 presidential campaign and how these systems operated in Northeast Philadelphia. Three research questions guided these observations: How was political communication produced, disseminated, and decoded through interpersonal, mass, and digital communication by the Democratic candidate, her Latino communication staff, and Northeast Philadelphia Latino residents during the 2016 presidential campaign? What were the functions, norms, and values that structured the political communication systems among the Democratic candidate, her Latino communication staff, and Northeast Philadelphia Latino residents? What were the power relations that informed the interactions between the Democratic candidate, her Latino communication staff, and Northeast Philadelphia Latino residents in the political communication system? For this dissertation, I devised the Political Communication Systems Model, a toolkit to observe and theorize on political communication. Under the grounded theory umbrella, two methods were used to collect data. First, Clinton’s mediated campaign communication was monitored. Second, I worked as a volunteer in a field operations office that Clinton opened in Philadelphia and performed a participant observation. Clinton built a political communication machine to produce a campaign that used a hybrid media system. She hired a large staff to design and execute an "air war" (i.e., radio and TV ads and journalistic coverage), a digital campaign (i.e., distribution of information through websites, blogs, social media, newsletters and text messages), and a "ground game" (i.e., canvassing, phone banking, and online messaging). The Latino campaign was designed to promote liberal values such as globalism, cosmopolitanism, multiculturalism, and diversity, values that shaped her economic and political proposals. The ground game had three main objectives in Northeast Philadelphia: register new voters, create strategies to persuade undecided voters to support Hillary Clinton, and organize the "Get Out the Vote" (GOTV), which consists of convincing people to get out their houses, go to the polling station, and vote. A substantial part of the dissertation focuses on describing and analyzing the ground game in Northeast Philadelphia and offers two significant findings. First, political communication systems need material infrastructures operate. Clinton built a material infrastructure to communicate with residents. This infrastructure was made, primarily, of human bodies that were able to move around the territory and use other communicative technologies smartphones, tablets, and computers. Second, human bodies were also used as symbolic devices. Clinton recruited staffers and volunteers whose bodies embodied values such as diversity, multiculturalism, cosmopolitanism, and globalism. The biographies and trajectories of these…

Advisors/Committee Members: Morris, Nancy;, Murphy, Patrick, Creech, Brian, Suárez, Sandra L.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Political science; Hispanic American studies;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Larrosa Fuentes, J. S. (2018). Communication and the Body Politic: Hillary Clinton’s 2016 Presidential Campaign in Philadelphia’s Latino Community. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,507196

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Larrosa Fuentes, Juan S. “Communication and the Body Politic: Hillary Clinton’s 2016 Presidential Campaign in Philadelphia’s Latino Community.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,507196.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Larrosa Fuentes, Juan S. “Communication and the Body Politic: Hillary Clinton’s 2016 Presidential Campaign in Philadelphia’s Latino Community.” 2018. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Larrosa Fuentes JS. Communication and the Body Politic: Hillary Clinton’s 2016 Presidential Campaign in Philadelphia’s Latino Community. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,507196.

Council of Science Editors:

Larrosa Fuentes JS. Communication and the Body Politic: Hillary Clinton’s 2016 Presidential Campaign in Philadelphia’s Latino Community. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,507196


Temple University

3. Almujaibel, Naser Bader. CHANGING A SYSTEM FROM WITHIN: APPLYING THE THEORY OF COMMUNICATIVE ACTION FOR FUNDAMENTAL POLICY CHANGES IN KUWAIT.

Degree: PhD, 2018, Temple University

Media & Communication

Political legitimacy is a fundamental problem in the modern state. According to Habermas (1973), current legitimation methods are losing the sufficiency needed to support political systems and decisions. In response, Habermas (1987) developed the theory of communicative action as a new method for establishing political legitimacy. The current study applies the communicative action theory to Kuwait’s current political transformation. This study addresses the nature of the foundation of Kuwait, the regional situation, the internal political context, and the current economic challenges. The specific political transformation examined in this study is a national development project known as Vision of 2035 supported by the Amir as the head of the state. The project aims to develop a third of Kuwait’s land and five islands as special economic zones (SEZ). The project requires new legislation that would fundamentally change the political and economic identity of the country. The study applies the communicative action theory in order to achieve a mutual understanding between different groups in Kuwait regarding the project’s features and the legislation required to achieve them.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Morris, Nancy;, Creech, Brian, Osman, Wazhmah, Yom, Sean L.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Political science; Mass communication;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Almujaibel, N. B. (2018). CHANGING A SYSTEM FROM WITHIN: APPLYING THE THEORY OF COMMUNICATIVE ACTION FOR FUNDAMENTAL POLICY CHANGES IN KUWAIT. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,508399

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Almujaibel, Naser Bader. “CHANGING A SYSTEM FROM WITHIN: APPLYING THE THEORY OF COMMUNICATIVE ACTION FOR FUNDAMENTAL POLICY CHANGES IN KUWAIT.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,508399.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Almujaibel, Naser Bader. “CHANGING A SYSTEM FROM WITHIN: APPLYING THE THEORY OF COMMUNICATIVE ACTION FOR FUNDAMENTAL POLICY CHANGES IN KUWAIT.” 2018. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Almujaibel NB. CHANGING A SYSTEM FROM WITHIN: APPLYING THE THEORY OF COMMUNICATIVE ACTION FOR FUNDAMENTAL POLICY CHANGES IN KUWAIT. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,508399.

Council of Science Editors:

Almujaibel NB. CHANGING A SYSTEM FROM WITHIN: APPLYING THE THEORY OF COMMUNICATIVE ACTION FOR FUNDAMENTAL POLICY CHANGES IN KUWAIT. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,508399

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