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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Collier-Thomas, Bettye"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Nier, III Charles, Lewis. Race Financial Institutions, Credit Discrimination And African American Homeownership In Philadelphia, 1880-1960.

Degree: PhD, 2011, Temple University

History

In the wake of Emancipation, African Americans viewed land and home ownership as an essential element of their "citizenship rights." However, efforts to achieve such ownership in the postbellum era were often stymied by credit discrimination as many blacks were ensnared in a system of debt peonage. Despite such obstacles, African Americans achieved land ownership in surprising numbers in rural and urban areas in the South. At the beginning of the twentieth century, millions of African Americans began leaving the South for the North with continued aspirations of homeownership. As blacks sought to fulfill the American Dream, many financial institutions refused to provide loans to them or provided loans with onerous terms and conditions. In response, a small group of African American leaders, working in conjunction with a number of the major black churches in Philadelphia, built the largest network of race financial institutions in the United States to provide credit to black home buyers. The leaders recognized economic development through homeownership as an integral piece of the larger civil rights movement dedicated to challenging white supremacy. The race financial institutions successfully provided hundreds of mortgage loans to African Americans and were a key reason for the tripling of the black homeownership rate in Philadelphia from 1910 to 1930. During the Great Depression, the federal government revolutionized home financing with a series of programs that greatly expanded homeownership. However, the programs, such as those of the Federal Housing Administration, resulted in blacks being subjected to redlining and denied access to credit. In response, blacks were often forced to turn to alternative sources of high cost credit to finance the purchase of homes. Nevertheless, as a new wave of African American migrants arrived to Philadelphia during post-World War II era, blacks fought to purchase homes and two major race financial institutions continued to provide mortgage loans to African Americans in Philadelphia. The resolve of blacks to overcome credit discrimination to purchase homes through the creation of race financial institutions was a key part of the broader struggle for civil rights in the United States.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Jenkins, Wilbert L., Kusmer, Kenneth L., Collier-Thomas, Bettye, Goldstein, Ira.

Subjects/Keywords: American History; Black History; Banking; black; civil rights; discrimination; homeownership; mortgage loans; redlining

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nier, III Charles, L. (2011). Race Financial Institutions, Credit Discrimination And African American Homeownership In Philadelphia, 1880-1960. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,147848

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nier, III Charles, Lewis. “Race Financial Institutions, Credit Discrimination And African American Homeownership In Philadelphia, 1880-1960.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,147848.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nier, III Charles, Lewis. “Race Financial Institutions, Credit Discrimination And African American Homeownership In Philadelphia, 1880-1960.” 2011. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Nier, III Charles L. Race Financial Institutions, Credit Discrimination And African American Homeownership In Philadelphia, 1880-1960. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,147848.

Council of Science Editors:

Nier, III Charles L. Race Financial Institutions, Credit Discrimination And African American Homeownership In Philadelphia, 1880-1960. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,147848


Temple University

2. Oestreich, Julia. They Saw Themselves as Workers: Interracial Unionism in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and the Development of Black Labor Organizations, 1933-1940.

Degree: PhD, 2011, Temple University

History

'They Saw Themselves as Workers' explores the development of black membership in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) in the wake of the "Uprising of the 30,000" garment strike of 1933-34, as well as the establishment of independent black labor or labor-related organizations during the mid-late 1930s. The locus for the growth of black ILGWU membership was Harlem, where there were branches of Local 22, one of the largest and the most diverse ILGWU local. Harlem was also where the Negro Labor Committee (NLC) was established by Frank Crosswaith, a leading black socialist and ILGWU organizer. I provide some background, but concentrate on the aftermath of the marked increase in black membership in the ILGWU during the 1933-34 garment uprising and end in 1940, when blacks confirmed their support of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and when the labor-oriented National Negro Congress (NNC) was irrevocably split by struggles over communist influence. By that time, the NLC was also struggling, due to both a lack of support from trade unions and friendly organizations, as well as the fact that the Committee was constrained by the political views and personal grudges of its founder. Yet, during the period examined in "They Saw Themselves as Workers," the ILGWU and its Local 22 thrived. Using primary sources including the records of the ILGWU and various locals, the NLC, and the NNC, I argue that educational programming was largely responsible for the ILGWU's success during the 1930s, not political ideology, as others have argued. In fact, I assert that political ideology was often detrimental to organizations like the NLC and NNC, alienating many blacks during a period when they increasingly shifted their allegiance to the Democratic Party. Conversely, through educational programming that brought unionists of various racial and ethnic backgrounds together and celebrated their differences, the ILGWU assimilated new African American members and strengthened interracial working-class solidarity. That programming included such ostensibly apolitical activities as classes, dances, musical and theatrical performances, sporting events, and trips to resorts and places of cultural interest. Yet, by attracting workers who wanted to expand their minds and enjoy their lives outside of work to combat the misery of the Depression, the ILGWU cemented their devotion to the union and its agenda. Thus, through activities that were not overtly political, the ILGWU drew workers into the labor movement, and ultimately into the New Deal coalition in support of President Roosevelt and the Democratic Party. As the union flourished, part of an increasingly influential labor movement, it offered African American workers a better path to political power than the Negro Labor Committee or the National Negro Congress during the mid-late 1930s.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Collier-Thomas, Bettye, Kusmer, Kenneth L., Alexander, Michael, Orleck, Annelise;.

Subjects/Keywords: American History; African American Studies; Ethnic Studies; African Americans; Labor; New Deal

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Oestreich, J. (2011). They Saw Themselves as Workers: Interracial Unionism in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and the Development of Black Labor Organizations, 1933-1940. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,156801

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Oestreich, Julia. “They Saw Themselves as Workers: Interracial Unionism in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and the Development of Black Labor Organizations, 1933-1940.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,156801.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Oestreich, Julia. “They Saw Themselves as Workers: Interracial Unionism in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and the Development of Black Labor Organizations, 1933-1940.” 2011. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Oestreich J. They Saw Themselves as Workers: Interracial Unionism in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and the Development of Black Labor Organizations, 1933-1940. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,156801.

Council of Science Editors:

Oestreich J. They Saw Themselves as Workers: Interracial Unionism in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and the Development of Black Labor Organizations, 1933-1940. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,156801


Temple University

3. Fry, Jennifer Reed. 'Our girls can match 'em every time': The Political Activities of African American Women in Philadelphia, 1912-1941.

Degree: PhD, 2010, Temple University

History

This dissertation challenges the dominant interpretation in women's history of the 1920s and 1930s as the "doldrums of the women's movement," and demonstrates that Philadelphia's political history is incomplete without the inclusion of African American women's voices. Given their well-developed bases of power in social reform, club, church, and interracial groups and strong tradition of political activism, these women exerted tangible pressure on Philadelphia's political leaders to reshape the reform agenda. When success was not forthcoming through traditional political means, African American women developed alternate strategies to secure their political agenda. While this dissertation is a traditional social and political history, it will also combine elements of biography in order to reconstruct the lives of Philadelphia's African American political women. This work does not describe a united sisterhood among women or portray this period as one of unparalleled success. Rather, this dissertation will bring a new balance to political history that highlights the importance of local political activism and is at the same time sensitive to issues of race, gender, and class. Central to this study will be the development of biographical sketches for the key African American women activists in Philadelphia, reconstructing the challenges they faced in the political arena, as feminists and as reformers. Enfranchisement did not immediately translate into political power, as black women's efforts to achieve their goals were often frustrated by racial tension with white women and gender divisions within the African American community. This dissertation also contributes to the historical debate regarding the shifting partisan alliance of the African American community. African Americans not intimately tied to the club movement or machine politics spearheaded the move away from the Republicans. They did so not out of economic reasons or as a result of Democratic overtures but because of the poor record of the Republicans on racial issues. Crystal Bird Fauset's rise to political power, as the first African American woman elected to a state legislature in the United States, provides important insight into Philadelphia Democratic politics, the African American community, and the extensive organizational and political networks woven by African American women.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Collier-Thomas, Bettye, Klepp, Susan E., Varon, Elizabeth R., Miller, Randall M..

Subjects/Keywords: History, United States; Women's Studies; History, Black; African American Women; Fauset; Crystal Bird; Philadelphia; Political History; Suffrage

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fry, J. R. (2010). 'Our girls can match 'em every time': The Political Activities of African American Women in Philadelphia, 1912-1941. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,61373

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fry, Jennifer Reed. “'Our girls can match 'em every time': The Political Activities of African American Women in Philadelphia, 1912-1941.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,61373.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fry, Jennifer Reed. “'Our girls can match 'em every time': The Political Activities of African American Women in Philadelphia, 1912-1941.” 2010. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Fry JR. 'Our girls can match 'em every time': The Political Activities of African American Women in Philadelphia, 1912-1941. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,61373.

Council of Science Editors:

Fry JR. 'Our girls can match 'em every time': The Political Activities of African American Women in Philadelphia, 1912-1941. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2010. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,61373

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