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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Cagle, Paul Chris"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Jeong, Ok Hee. REMEMBERING AND REPRESENTING DANCE: RE-TRACING THE GENEALOGY OF NONFICTIONAL ANALOG DANCE MEDIA IN THE FORMATION OF THE NORTH AMERICAN DANCE FIELD.

Degree: PhD, 2012, Temple University

Dance

This dissertation shed light on the hitherto overshadowed area of nonfictional analog dance media by contextualizing and historicizing it within the North American dance field. It is a revisionist historiography examining how nonfictional dance media has been conceptualized, regulated, and institutionalized in tandem with the North American dance field's agenda of legitimizing dance as an artistic and academic field. Approaching the discursive shape of nonfictional analog dance media as a unique cultural construction, I argue that nonfictional dance media is not a simple stand-in for live dance, but an ambiguous and ambivalent object reflecting our beliefs and desires projected on dance. Thus, I suggest that nonfictional dance media provides a strategic setting for reconsideration of the operation of the dance field, especially that of North America. The research questions this study addresses include the following: how was the field of nonfictional dance media formulated and institutionalized according to the North American dance field's agenda of legitimizing dance as an artistic and academic field; how has nonfictional dance media constituted and reconceptualized the knowledge claims in the dance field by preserving and representing dance; and how has the discourse of nonfictional media resonated with the discourse of dance in modernity? As a historiography, I re-write the genealogy of nonfictional analog dance media within the formation of the North American field between 1927 and the 1980s. Also, for case studies, I compare the New York Public Library's Dance Division and the George Balanchine Foundation Video Archives to examine the discourse of dance preservation, while analyzing the schism between the intention and the reception of an ambitious TV dance program Dancing (Channel 13/WNET, 1993) to examine the discourse of dance representation. In so doing, I explore how nonfictional dance media has shaped and been shaped by the North American dance field's internal conceptualization of dance knowledge and external advocacy of legitimizing dance in its society. This study suggests that nonfictional dance media is – just as dance is – a phenomenon with cultural, economic, and political implications and imbalances. Particularly highlighting that media's duality of an icon and an index corresponds with the conceptualization of dance as choreography and performance, I further find that this duality resonates with the ambivalent desires of the modernist temporality. While time has been rationalized, the attraction of contingency has also increased in reaction to it. Similarly, while nonfictional analog dance media has been rationalized, controlled, and institutionalized according to the American dance field's agenda of legitimizing dance, this effort of rationalization not only raised the criteria of knowledge claims but also enhanced the attraction of the irrational, contingent aspect of dance. Given that, this dissertation argues that nonfictional dance media is not a simple imprint of dance but the…

Advisors/Committee Members: Kahlich, Luke C., Welsh-Asante, Kariamu, Cagle, Paul Chris, Jhala, Jayasinhji.

Subjects/Keywords: Dance; Film studies; American studies; Dance media; dance preservation; dance representation; dance studies; nonfictional media

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jeong, O. H. (2012). REMEMBERING AND REPRESENTING DANCE: RE-TRACING THE GENEALOGY OF NONFICTIONAL ANALOG DANCE MEDIA IN THE FORMATION OF THE NORTH AMERICAN DANCE FIELD. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,201041

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jeong, Ok Hee. “REMEMBERING AND REPRESENTING DANCE: RE-TRACING THE GENEALOGY OF NONFICTIONAL ANALOG DANCE MEDIA IN THE FORMATION OF THE NORTH AMERICAN DANCE FIELD.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,201041.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jeong, Ok Hee. “REMEMBERING AND REPRESENTING DANCE: RE-TRACING THE GENEALOGY OF NONFICTIONAL ANALOG DANCE MEDIA IN THE FORMATION OF THE NORTH AMERICAN DANCE FIELD.” 2012. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Jeong OH. REMEMBERING AND REPRESENTING DANCE: RE-TRACING THE GENEALOGY OF NONFICTIONAL ANALOG DANCE MEDIA IN THE FORMATION OF THE NORTH AMERICAN DANCE FIELD. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,201041.

Council of Science Editors:

Jeong OH. REMEMBERING AND REPRESENTING DANCE: RE-TRACING THE GENEALOGY OF NONFICTIONAL ANALOG DANCE MEDIA IN THE FORMATION OF THE NORTH AMERICAN DANCE FIELD. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,201041


Temple University

2. Mau, Heidi A. Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory and Harvey Milk.

Degree: PhD, 2017, Temple University

Media & Communication

Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory, and Harvey Milk examines publicly available media, artifacts and events in service of remembering Harvey Milk, who in 1977 became the first openly gay man elected to public office in California. Although he addressed issues of a diverse constituency, Milk is often remembered for demanding gay rights, his co-authorship of the San Francisco’s Human Rights Ordinance, and a successful campaign against the passage of Proposition 6 in 1978, a state proposition to prohibit gay men and lesbian women from working in public schools. His political career ended weeks later, when Milk was assassinated, along with San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, by former city supervisor and colleague Dan White. Forms of public and popular media addressing the remembrance of Milk and communicating his legacy include: journalism, books, documentary and fiction film, public art, theatrical and musical performances, memorials, commemorations, public history exhibitions, as well as types of legacy-naming. I term this media material media memoria – material in service of remembering. Through a mix of textual methods (visual/narrative/discourse), fieldwork (participant observation, interviewing) and archival/historical research methods, I examine how Milk media memoria create representations and narratives of Harvey Milk. I focus on how these representations narratives are used over time in the construction, negotiation and maintenance of local, LGBTQIA+ and eventually a larger public memory of Harvey Milk. This project is a mix of history, memory, and media analysis. It is written as an overlapping chronology, so the reader can experience the mediated communication of Milk’s legacy as it moves forward through time. It is situated within the study of media and communication but is interdisciplinary in that it finds inspiration from memory studies, film and media studies, museum and exhibition studies, and public history – all areas in which communication with a public, and mediated communication, play integral parts of collective memory narrative building. Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory and Harvey Milk aspires to be a contribution toward a more comprehensive history of the memory of Milk. The project concludes with a summary of the core and layered Milk memory narratives, a look at the key memory keepers and institutional players in Milk memory maintenance, and a discussion of the future of Milk memory. Through a discussion of how media memoria communicate the legacy of Harvey Milk, the dissertation adds to scholarly knowledge about how collective memory of public figures is constructed in American culture. Additionally, the dissertation works toward resolving deficiencies in research addressing LGBTQIA+ collective memory studies.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Kitch, Carolyn L.;, Mendelson, Andrew L. (Andrew Lawrence), Cagle, Paul Chris, Alwood, Edward;.

Subjects/Keywords: Mass communication; LGBTQ studies; Communication;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mau, H. A. (2017). Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory and Harvey Milk. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,438524

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mau, Heidi A. “Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory and Harvey Milk.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,438524.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mau, Heidi A. “Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory and Harvey Milk.” 2017. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mau HA. Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory and Harvey Milk. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,438524.

Council of Science Editors:

Mau HA. Communicating Legacy: Media, Memory and Harvey Milk. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,438524

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