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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Braddock, Alan C.;"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Moudry, Nick. A Foreign Mirror: Intertexts with Surrealism in Twentieth-Century U. S. Poetries.

Degree: PhD, 2012, Temple University

English

In the latter half of the twentieth-century, fewer U. S. poets translated foreign poetry than their modernist predecessors. The scope of their translation projects correspondingly narrowed. Gone, for example, were projects like Ezra Pound's reaching back to thirteenth-century Italy to see how U. S. poets could push forward. Instead, translations of European and Latin American modernism prevailed. Often, multiple translations of the same author were produced by different translators at the expense of presenting a more well-rounded vision of national literatures. Of these translations, a surprisingly large number were of poets who were either loosely or explicitly connected to surrealism as a literary movement. This dissertation locates this explosion of interest in surrealism as an attraction to the surrealist emphasis on reconciling binaries. This emphasis allows American poets a convenient frame through which to confront the difficult questions of place and nation that arise as the U. S. position in the field of world literature shifts from periphery to core. Previous researchers have traced the history of surrealism's early reception in the United States, but these studies tend to not only focus on the movement's influence on American art, but also stop shortly after surrealist expatriates returned to Europe following WWII. This dissertation extends these approaches both by bringing the conversation up to the present and by examining the key role that translation and other forms of rewriting play in mediating the relationship between surrealism and American audiences. As surrealism enters the U. S. literary system, the transformed product is often not what one might expect. U. S. rewritings of surrealist literature are primarily carried out by poets and critics whose fundamental interest in the movement lies in finding a foreign mirror for their own aesthetic or ideological preoccupations. This in turn provokes the development of a strand of surrealist-influenced writing whose aims and goals are vastly different from those of the movement's founders.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: DuPlessis, Rachel Blau, Venuti, Lawrence, Osman, Jena, Braddock, Alan C..

Subjects/Keywords: American literature; Comparative literature; Modern literature; Poetry; Surrealism; Translation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moudry, N. (2012). A Foreign Mirror: Intertexts with Surrealism in Twentieth-Century U. S. Poetries. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,202600

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moudry, Nick. “A Foreign Mirror: Intertexts with Surrealism in Twentieth-Century U. S. Poetries.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,202600.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moudry, Nick. “A Foreign Mirror: Intertexts with Surrealism in Twentieth-Century U. S. Poetries.” 2012. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Moudry N. A Foreign Mirror: Intertexts with Surrealism in Twentieth-Century U. S. Poetries. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,202600.

Council of Science Editors:

Moudry N. A Foreign Mirror: Intertexts with Surrealism in Twentieth-Century U. S. Poetries. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,202600


Temple University

2. Iepson, Sarah M. Postmortem Relationships: Death and the Child in Antebellum American Visual Culture.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Temple University

Art History

Since Roland Barthes published Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography in 1982, the prevailing theory about photography has revolved around its primary role as a manifestation of transience, death, and mortality. Whether one promotes the philosophy that the photographic image steals away the soul and promotes death, or that it simply captures images of those that have died or will die, the photograph has been commonly interpreted as a visual reminder of the finality of human life. At no time does such an interpretation appear to be more tangibly true than during the mid-nineteenth century when the photograph was commonly used to preserve the actual visage of death in post- mortem portraiture. Here, death is not suggested or implied, but is vividly present. However, the theoretical emphasis that Barthes placed on death has limited our understanding of such images by eliding other meanings historically associated with them. As an addendum to Barthes, I propose that post-mortem images - particularly those of children - represent a more complex relationship between life and death as it pertained to nineteenth-century American culture. Moreover, I believe that it is important to consider post-mortem photography in tandem with painted mourning portraiture, and to contemplate both within a larger visual and cultural context in order to gain a more holistic understanding of these images in antebellum America. My dissertation will re-situate post-mortem representations of children within the material and religious culture of antebellum America, amid evolving historical beliefs about the life of children, the concept of childhood, and ideas about child-rearing, not just postmodern theoretical notions of death. My particular focus on children responds to the poignancy of childhood death in antebellum America and the way in which these images particularly embody the belief in continued existence through the afterlife. By placing such images within the wider context of nineteenth-century culture, I will demonstrate that life existed in death for antebellum Americans through the physical or material presence of the photograph along with Christian spiritual associations regarding the soul and the afterlife. In other words, belief in an ongoing relationship between material and immaterial "bodies" was exteriorized in the painted or photographic representation of the physical corpse, enabling antebellum Americans to interpret the image as both the icon and physical residue of the soul. I will demonstrate that the materiality of the post- mortem image allowed antebellum Americans to preserve that sense of life within death. While the material presence of the image acted as a reflection of "being," spiritual beliefs in a heavenly afterlife permitted nineteenth-century viewers to meditate on the perpetuation, rather than the impermanence, of existence. While this complex historical dimension of post-mortem imagery - a dimension largely ignored by Barthes - provides the central focus of my…

Advisors/Committee Members: Braddock, Alan C.;, Gold, Susanna, Orvell, Miles, Klepp, Susan E.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Art history;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Iepson, S. M. (2013). Postmortem Relationships: Death and the Child in Antebellum American Visual Culture. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,236801

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Iepson, Sarah M. “Postmortem Relationships: Death and the Child in Antebellum American Visual Culture.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,236801.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Iepson, Sarah M. “Postmortem Relationships: Death and the Child in Antebellum American Visual Culture.” 2013. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Iepson SM. Postmortem Relationships: Death and the Child in Antebellum American Visual Culture. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,236801.

Council of Science Editors:

Iepson SM. Postmortem Relationships: Death and the Child in Antebellum American Visual Culture. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,236801


Temple University

3. Igoe, Laura Turner. The Opulent City and the Sylvan State: Art and Environmental Embodiment in Early National Philadelphia.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Art History

This dissertation investigates the ways in which Philadelphia artists and architects visualized, comprehended, and reformed the city's rapidly changing urban environment in the early republic, prior to the modern articulation of "ecology" as a scientific concept by late nineteenth-century naturalists such as Ernst Haeckel. I consider a variety of different media – including popular depictions and manifestations of Penn's Treaty Elm, fireplace and stove models by Charles Willson Peale, architectural designs for the Philadelphia Waterworks by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, and a self-portrait bust by the sculptor William Rush – in order to demonstrate that the human body served as a powerful creative metaphor in Philadelphia circa 1800, not only for understanding and representing natural processes in political or aesthetic terms, but also for framing critical public discourse about the city's actual environmental conditions. Specifically, I reveal how this metaphorical framework produced a variety of effects in art and architecture of the period, sometimes facilitating and at other times obscuring an understanding about the natural world as an arena of dynamic transformation. By revealing the previously unexplored environmental significance of the objects in question, my dissertation asserts that ecological change played an instrumental role in shaping artistic production and urban development in the decades following United States independence.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: West, Ashley D., Braddock, Alan C.;, Dolan, Therese, Isenberg, Andrew C. (Andrew Christian), Bellion, Wendy;.

Subjects/Keywords: Art history; Environmental studies; American studies;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Igoe, L. T. (2014). The Opulent City and the Sylvan State: Art and Environmental Embodiment in Early National Philadelphia. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,287834

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Igoe, Laura Turner. “The Opulent City and the Sylvan State: Art and Environmental Embodiment in Early National Philadelphia.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,287834.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Igoe, Laura Turner. “The Opulent City and the Sylvan State: Art and Environmental Embodiment in Early National Philadelphia.” 2014. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Igoe LT. The Opulent City and the Sylvan State: Art and Environmental Embodiment in Early National Philadelphia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,287834.

Council of Science Editors:

Igoe LT. The Opulent City and the Sylvan State: Art and Environmental Embodiment in Early National Philadelphia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,287834

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