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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Bellas, Evangelia"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Yousefi Gharebaghi, Farzad. Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopic Assessment of Engineered Cartilage.

Degree: PhD, 2017, Temple University

Bioengineering

Articular cartilage has limited intrinsic healing capacity due to its dense and avascular structure. Clinical approaches have been developed to address the limitations associated with the poor ability of articular cartilage to regenerate. Current clinically approved techniques, however, can result in repair tissue that lacks appropriate hyaline cartilage biochemical and biomechanical properties, which lead to uncertain long-term clinical outcomes. Using tissue engineering strategies and a range of scaffolding materials, cell types, growth factors, culture conditions, and culture times, engineered tissues have been produced with compositional and biomechanical properties that approximate that of native tissue. In these studies, a considerable number of samples are typically sacrificed to evaluate compositional and mechanical properties, such as the amount of deposited collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) in the constructs. The number of sacrificed samples, as well as the amount of time and resources spent to evaluate the sacrificed samples using current gold standards, motivates an alternative method for evaluation of compositional properties. Vibrational spectroscopy, including infrared, has been considered as an alternative technique for assessment of tissues over the last 15-20 years. Infrared spectroscopy is based on absorbance of infrared light by tissue functional groups at specific vibrational frequencies, and thus, no external contrast is required. Vibrational spectroscopy is typically performed in two frequency regions, the mid infrared region (750-4000 cm-1), where penetration depth is limited to approximately 10 microns, and the near infrared (NIR) region (4000-12000 cm-1). In the NIR region, penetration of light is on the order of millimeters or centimeters, which makes it ideal for obtaining data through the full depth of engineered constructs. Here we employ NIR spectroscopy to nondestructively monitor the development of tissue-engineered constructs over culture period.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Pleshko, Nancy;, Patil, Chetan A., Bellas, Evangelia, Burdick, Jason A.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedical engineering; Bioengineering;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yousefi Gharebaghi, F. (2017). Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopic Assessment of Engineered Cartilage. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,477078

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yousefi Gharebaghi, Farzad. “Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopic Assessment of Engineered Cartilage.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,477078.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yousefi Gharebaghi, Farzad. “Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopic Assessment of Engineered Cartilage.” 2017. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Yousefi Gharebaghi F. Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopic Assessment of Engineered Cartilage. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,477078.

Council of Science Editors:

Yousefi Gharebaghi F. Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopic Assessment of Engineered Cartilage. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,477078


Temple University

2. Ghasemi Tahrir, Farzaneh. DYSREGULATION of PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IMPAIRS FUNCTION of PRIMARY CARDIOMYOCYTES.

Degree: PhD, 2018, Temple University

Bioengineering

Mitochondria provide the main energy required for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling via aerobic oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) process. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), by-products of mitochondrial respiration, within dysfunctional mitochondria results in the activation of cardiac cell death pathways and has been associated with heart failure development. Therefore, maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis as a balance between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation is of great importance toward cardiac proper functioning. In addition to the importance of mitochondrial energy supply, gap junctions, intercellular channels which connect plasma membrane of adjacent cardiomyocytes, by propagating action potential throughout the myocardium maintain cardiac synchronous beating and rhythm. Gap junctions have a rapid turnover and impair of gap junction quality control impacts cell-to-cell communication; resulting in electrical conduction abnormalities and arrhythmogenesis. Therefore, understanding the underlying mechanism the quality control of mitochondria and gap junctions profoundly contributes toward understating the genesis of cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, cardiovascular problems in HIV (Human immunodeficiency virus) positive patients whose viral load is controlled via antiretroviral therapy remains a problem while the underlying mechanism remains elusive. The current study has used an in vitro model of primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) to discover the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial as well as gap junction quality control under normal and stress conditions. Furthermore, electrical activities of the primary cardiomyocytes were recorded using microelectrode array (MEA) system and important electrophysiological components such as impulse propagation pattern and conduction velocity were extracted from the complex signal recordings. Overall, we have pursued four main aims; Aim 1. Dysregulation of mitochondrial quality control machinery leads to cardiac death; Aim 2. HIV-1 Tat (transcriptional transactivator) dysregulates cardiac homeostasis via mitochondrial pathway; Aim 3. Impairment of protein quality control impacts the quality of gap junction; Aim 4. Inhibition of gap junction quality dysregulates electrical signal propagation within the culture.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Khalili, Kamel;, Lelkes, Peter I., Marcinkiewicz, Cezary, Bellas, Evangelia, Sariyer, Ilker K.;.

Subjects/Keywords: Biochemistry; Engineering; Molecular biology;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ghasemi Tahrir, F. (2018). DYSREGULATION of PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IMPAIRS FUNCTION of PRIMARY CARDIOMYOCYTES. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,525002

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ghasemi Tahrir, Farzaneh. “DYSREGULATION of PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IMPAIRS FUNCTION of PRIMARY CARDIOMYOCYTES.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,525002.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ghasemi Tahrir, Farzaneh. “DYSREGULATION of PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IMPAIRS FUNCTION of PRIMARY CARDIOMYOCYTES.” 2018. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Ghasemi Tahrir F. DYSREGULATION of PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IMPAIRS FUNCTION of PRIMARY CARDIOMYOCYTES. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,525002.

Council of Science Editors:

Ghasemi Tahrir F. DYSREGULATION of PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IMPAIRS FUNCTION of PRIMARY CARDIOMYOCYTES. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2018. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,525002

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