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You searched for +publisher:"Temple University" +contributor:("Achary, Mohan P."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Johnson, Candice Marcia. Predicting the Estrogenic and Androgenic Activity of Environmental Waters: A Quantitative Study on Mixture Interactions.

Degree: PhD, 2012, Temple University

Civil Engineering

Steroid hormones confer biological activity to effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The occurrence of estrogen and androgen hormones in addition to their biological effects in the environment have been widely studied and there is a growing consensus that mixtures of steroid hormones; albeit at low ng L-1concentrations, lead to endocrine disruption in some aquatic organisms. These mixtures may also be influenced by the contributions of synthetic estrogens and androgens, which may display either additive or antagonistic activity. In order to measure the ability of a single compound, or complex mixture to influence the function of estrogenic or androgenic signaling pathways bioassays are used. Most commonly, these tests are in vitro and may quantify the ability of a compound to bind and/or (in) activate the steroid receptors. Two commonly used bioassays for estrogenicity detection are the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) and the E-Screen assay. The Yeast Androgen Screen (YAS) is commonly used to measure androgenic activity. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) are genetically transformed and express either the human Estrogen Receptor (ER) or Androgen Receptor (AR), and contain Estrogen or Androgen Responsive Elements (ERE/ARE) and Lac Z reporting plasmids. Once the receptors become activated, beta-Galactosidase is secreted into the assay medium and the level of beta-Galactosidase secretion relates to the estrogenicity or androgenicity of the sample tested. Due to its simplicity and the moderately fast assay time, the YES and YAS are commonly used assays in the analysis of complex mixtures to identify the major contributors to both estrogenic and (anti)-androgenic activity in environmental water. The effect directed approach combines both chemical methods and bioassays in a chemical fractionation scheme that is directed by the bioassays. In order to confirm the identity of the key contributors, it is important to compare the biological activities that are calculated from the concentrations of the identified hormones (given their individual biological responses) and the total biological activity measured through the use of bioassays, Equation 1. RPsCs+ RP2C2+ ...+RPnCn = IEQ (1) where Cn is the concentration of the nth mixture constituent, RP is the relative (estrogenic or androgenic) potential of the nth mixture constituent as determined in the bioassay, and IEQ is the estimated total induction equivalent concentration of the mixture by chemical methods. Cs and RPs represents the concentration and relative potential of a standard compound respectively. Agreement between the chemically and biologically derived IEQs means that the major contributors to the biological effect have been successfully identified. However, the biological assays measure the contribution of additive, antagonistic and synergistic activity in the mixture; therefore, the biologically derived IEQs represent the net biological activity. Chemical methods are unable to predict these interactions and as such the result of the…

Advisors/Committee Members: Suri, Rominder P.S., Van Aken, Benoit, Manickavachagam, Muruganandham, Achary, Mohan P..

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental engineering; Toxicology; Biology; Androgen; Antagonism; Endocrine disruption; Estrogen; Prediction models; Synergism

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APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, C. M. (2012). Predicting the Estrogenic and Androgenic Activity of Environmental Waters: A Quantitative Study on Mixture Interactions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214801

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Candice Marcia. “Predicting the Estrogenic and Androgenic Activity of Environmental Waters: A Quantitative Study on Mixture Interactions.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214801.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Candice Marcia. “Predicting the Estrogenic and Androgenic Activity of Environmental Waters: A Quantitative Study on Mixture Interactions.” 2012. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Johnson CM. Predicting the Estrogenic and Androgenic Activity of Environmental Waters: A Quantitative Study on Mixture Interactions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214801.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson CM. Predicting the Estrogenic and Androgenic Activity of Environmental Waters: A Quantitative Study on Mixture Interactions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214801


Temple University

2. Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar. SYNTHETIC MICROVASCULAR NETWORKS FOR PARTICLE ADHESION ASSAYS.

Degree: PhD, 2012, Temple University

Mechanical Engineering

Particle adhesion to the vasculature depends critically upon particle/cell properties (size, receptors), scale/geometric features of vasculature (diameter, bifurcation, etc.) and local hemodynamic factors (stress, torque, etc.) Current investigations using in vitro parallel-plate flow chambers suffer from several limitations including (a) idealized constructs, (b) lack of critical morphological features (bifurcations, network), (c) inability to distinguish between healthy vs. diseased vasculature, (d) large volumes and (e) non-disposability. To overcome these limitations, microvascular networks, obtained from digitization of in vivo topology were prototyped using soft-lithography techniques to generate Synthetic Microvascular Networks (SMN). CFD-ACE+, a finite volume based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, was used to develop a computational model of the digitized networks. Dye perfusion patterns predicted by the simulations matched well with experimental observations indicating presence of well perfused as well as stagnant regions. Studies using functionalized microparticles showed non-uniform particle adhesion, with preferential adhesion at a distance of 2 vessel diameters or less from the nearest bifurcation which was validated with in vivo data. Bifurcation adhesion ratio (BAR) was found to be significantly higher for experiments (49% and 36%) and simulations (67% and 52%) compared to expected values of 24% and 21%. A single experimental run in SMN generated the entire shear adhesion map highlighting the benefits of the SMN assay. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene delivery studies with a nanopolymeric based gene delivery system showed preferential GFP expression in the vicinity of bends and bifurcation of the microvascular networks. The developed SMN based microfluidic device will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to characterize and develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery, where it can be used to study the efficacy of the drug in these realistic microvascular networks.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Kiani, Mohammad F., Pillapakkam, Shriram, Wang, Bin, Bai, Li, Achary, Mohan P., Pant, Kapil.

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedical engineering; Adhesion; Bifurcation; Flow; Particles; Shear; Synthetic Microvascular Networks

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Prabhakarpandian, B. (2012). SYNTHETIC MICROVASCULAR NETWORKS FOR PARTICLE ADHESION ASSAYS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,184442

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar. “SYNTHETIC MICROVASCULAR NETWORKS FOR PARTICLE ADHESION ASSAYS.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,184442.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar. “SYNTHETIC MICROVASCULAR NETWORKS FOR PARTICLE ADHESION ASSAYS.” 2012. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Prabhakarpandian B. SYNTHETIC MICROVASCULAR NETWORKS FOR PARTICLE ADHESION ASSAYS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,184442.

Council of Science Editors:

Prabhakarpandian B. SYNTHETIC MICROVASCULAR NETWORKS FOR PARTICLE ADHESION ASSAYS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,184442


Temple University

3. Lamberti, Giuseppina. A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Temple University

Mechanical Engineering

There is a clear need for testing targeted drug carrier systems in a more realistic microenvironment where both biochemical interactions and shear forces are present. This is critical both for understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in this process and during the drug discovery process. Current in vitro models of the leukocyte adhesion cascade cannot be used for real-time studies of the entire leukocyte adhesion cascade including rolling, adhesion and migration in a single assay. In this study, we have developed and validated a novel bioinspired microfluidic device (bMFD) and used it to test the hypothesis that blocking of specific steps in the adhesion/migration cascade significantly affects other steps of the cascade. The bMFD consists of an endothelialized microvascular network in communication with a tissue compartment via a 3 µm porous barrier. Human neutrophils in bMFD preferentially adhered to activated human endothelial cells near bifurcations with rolling and adhesion patterns in close agreement with in vivo observations. Treating endothelial cells with monoclonal antibodies to E-selectin or ICAM-1 or treating neutrophils with wortmannin reduced rolling, adhesion, and migration of neutrophils to 60%, 20% and 18% of their respective control values. Antibody blocking of specific steps in the adhesion/migration cascade (e.g. mAb to E-selectin) significantly downregulated other steps of the cascade (e.g. migration). This novel in vitro assay provides a realistic human cell based model for basic science studies, identification of new treatment targets, selection of pathways to target validation, and rapid screening of candidate agents.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Kiani, Mohammad F.;, Wang, Bin, Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar, Achary, Mohan P., Pillapakkam, Shriram, Krynska, Barbara;.

Subjects/Keywords: Engineering; Mechanical engineering;

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lamberti, G. (2014). A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,265841

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lamberti, Giuseppina. “A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,265841.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lamberti, Giuseppina. “A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE.” 2014. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lamberti G. A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,265841.

Council of Science Editors:

Lamberti G. A BIOMIMETIC MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MODELING THE LEUKOCYTE ADHESION/MIGRATION CASCADE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2014. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,265841

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