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You searched for +publisher:"Syracuse University" +contributor:("Lee W. McKnight"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Syracuse University

1. Chango, Mawaki. Becoming Artifacts: Medieval Seals, Passports and the Future of Digital Identity.

Degree: PhD, Information Science and Technology, 2012, Syracuse University

What does a digital identity token have to do with medieval seals? Is the history of passports of any use for enabling the discovery of Internet users' identity when crossing virtual domain boundaries during their digital browsing and transactions? The agility of the Internet architecture and its simplicity of use have been the engines of its growth and success with the users worldwide. As it turns out, there lies also its crux. In effect, Internet industry participants have argued that the critical problem business is faced with on the Internet is the absence of an identity layer from the core protocols of its logical infrastructure. As a result, the cyberspace parallels a global "territory" without any identification mechanism that is reliable, consistent and interoperable across domains. This dissertation is an investigation of the steps being taken by Internet stakeholders in order to resolve its identity problems, through the lenses of historical instances where similar challenges were tackled by social actors. Social science research addressing the Internet identity issues is barely nascent. Research on identification systems in general is either characterized by a paucity of historical perspective, or scantily references digital technology and online identification processes. This research is designed to bridge that gap. The general question at its core is: How do social actors, events or processes enable the historical emergence of authoritative identity credentials for the public at large? This work is guided by that line of inquiry through three broad historical case studies: first, the medieval experience with seals used as identity tokens in the signing of deeds that resulted in transfers of rights, particularly estate rights; second, comes the modern, national state with its claim to the right to know all individuals on its territory through credentials such as the passport or the national identity card; and finally, viewed from the United States, the case of ongoing efforts to build an online digital identity infrastructure. Following a process-tracing approach to historical case study, this inquiry presents enlightening connections between the three identity frameworks while further characterizing each. We understand how the medieval doctrines of the Trinity and the Eucharist developed by schoolmen within the Church accommodated seals as markers of identity, and we understand how the modern state seized on the term `nationality' - which emerged as late as in the 19th century - to make it into a legal fiction that was critical for its identification project. Furthermore, this investigation brings analytical insights which enable us to locate the dynamics driving the emergence of those identity systems. An ordering of the contributing factors in sequential categories is proposed in a sociohistorical approach to explain the causal mechanisms at work across these large phenomena. Finally this research also proposes historically informed projections of scenarios as possible pathways to the… Advisors/Committee Members: Lee W. McKnight.

Subjects/Keywords: Artifact; Credential; Digital; Identity; Passport; Seal; Library and Information Science; Public Policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chango, M. (2012). Becoming Artifacts: Medieval Seals, Passports and the Future of Digital Identity. (Doctoral Dissertation). Syracuse University. Retrieved from https://surface.syr.edu/it_etd/74

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chango, Mawaki. “Becoming Artifacts: Medieval Seals, Passports and the Future of Digital Identity.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Syracuse University. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://surface.syr.edu/it_etd/74.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chango, Mawaki. “Becoming Artifacts: Medieval Seals, Passports and the Future of Digital Identity.” 2012. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Chango M. Becoming Artifacts: Medieval Seals, Passports and the Future of Digital Identity. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Syracuse University; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://surface.syr.edu/it_etd/74.

Council of Science Editors:

Chango M. Becoming Artifacts: Medieval Seals, Passports and the Future of Digital Identity. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Syracuse University; 2012. Available from: https://surface.syr.edu/it_etd/74

2. Meyerrose, Dale W. Introducing Wireless Grids Technology to the Field of Telemedicine.

Degree: Doctor of Professional Studies, Information Science and Technology, 2014, Syracuse University

While telemedicine and technology-enabled education are not new concepts and have significant bodies of research, in depth application to management and treatment of veteran Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is relatively new. The conflicts in the Southwest Asia over the last two decades have significantly increased the need for healthcare and support services for these returning warriors. Creative thinking and innovative technologies are needed to meet the growing and changing demand of these patients in the face of many competing demands within the U.S. healthcare sector. This doctoral research study investigated the potential for a platform-agnostic (ad hoc) networking technology to serve as a trusted social networking and training platform for healthcare providers who are striving to provide quality healthcare that meets the needs of veterans suffering from PTSD and TBI. This research study analyzed the effectiveness of a digitally networked environment to deliver desired training and certification outcomes in a military healthcare environment. The level of acceptance of an ad hoc network technology (GridstreamRx) by healthcare professionals using it as an enabler of collaboration during the training process was evaluated. The results also assessed the readiness of healthcare professionals to use this Information Communications Technology (ICT), or analogous new applications and services, to help them perform their healthcare responsibilities. This thesis study, accomplished with the support of the U.S. Army and National Science Foundation, took place at two large military medical centers over a twelve-month period of time. Data was gathered from 568 healthcare professionals using quantitative survey instruments. Ninety-six respondents provided additional quantitative and qualitative inputs at various times during a proscribed training regimen. DeLone and McLean's 2003 Information System Success Model, modified by findings of more recent research, provided the theoretical lens for analyzing the data from 32 of the training participants in determining the perceived net benefit of the GridstreamRx technology. The data gathered for the study showed, at the 95% level of confidence, that a majority of the professionals of these two medical centers would perceive a positive net benefit from using GridstreamRx in a healthcare training environment. The conclusion from this analysis was that not only are the healthcare providers in this study ready to use ICT and social networking in this professional setting, but also that GridstreamRx is an acceptable platform for performing these functions. The study participants provided input with respect to their priorities regarding information sharing techniques, functionality, and suggestions for improving the platform. The outcomes confirmed that GridstreamRx can be a successful introduction of ad hoc networking to telemedicine. This thesis… Advisors/Committee Members: Lee W. McKnight.

Subjects/Keywords: Ad Hoc Networking; Adult Learning; Healthcare; Military; Telemedicine; Wireless Grids; Social and Behavioral Sciences

…as a Service” for the medical sector. The Syracuse University Wireless Grid Innovation… …purposes of this research, these sites were given pseudonyms as a part of the Syracuse University… …WiGiT)5 facility, a virtual distributed experimental testbed at Syracuse University… …WiGiT as a collaborative effort of Syracuse University, Virginia Tech, Massachusetts Institute… …Corporation provided access to its ad hoc network technology through Syracuse University to WiGiT… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Meyerrose, D. W. (2014). Introducing Wireless Grids Technology to the Field of Telemedicine. (Thesis). Syracuse University. Retrieved from https://surface.syr.edu/etd/74

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Meyerrose, Dale W. “Introducing Wireless Grids Technology to the Field of Telemedicine.” 2014. Thesis, Syracuse University. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://surface.syr.edu/etd/74.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Meyerrose, Dale W. “Introducing Wireless Grids Technology to the Field of Telemedicine.” 2014. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Meyerrose DW. Introducing Wireless Grids Technology to the Field of Telemedicine. [Internet] [Thesis]. Syracuse University; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://surface.syr.edu/etd/74.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Meyerrose DW. Introducing Wireless Grids Technology to the Field of Telemedicine. [Thesis]. Syracuse University; 2014. Available from: https://surface.syr.edu/etd/74

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Treglia, Joseph. Three Essays on Law Enforcement and Emergency Response Information Sharing and Collaboration: An Insider Perspective.

Degree: PhD, Information Science and Technology, 2013, Syracuse University

This dissertation identifies what may be done to overcome barriers to information sharing among federal, tribal, state, and local law enforcement agencies and emergency responders. Social, technical, and policy factors related to information sharing and collaboration in the law enforcement and emergency response communities are examined. This research improves information sharing and cooperation in this area. "Policing in most societies exists in a state of "dynamic tension" between forces that tend to isolate it and those that tend to integrate its functioning with other social structures" (Clark, 1965). Critical incidents and crimes today cross jurisdictions and involve multiple stakeholders and levels. Law enforcement and emergency response agencies at federal, tribal, state, and local levels, including private sector entities, gather information and resources but do not effectively share this with each other. Despite mandates to improve information sharing and cooperation, gaps remain perhaps because there is no clear understanding of what the barriers to information sharing are. Information sharing is examined using a multi-method, primarily qualitative, approach. A model for information sharing is presented that identifies social, technical, and policy factors as influencers. Facets of General Systems Theory, Socio-technical Theory, and Stakeholder Theory (among others) are considered in this context. Information sharing is the subject of the first work of the dissertation: a theoretical piece arguing for use of a conceptual framework consisting of social, technical, and policy factors. Social, technology, and policy factors are investigated in the second essay. That essay introduces a new transformative technology, "edgeware," that allows for unprecedented connectivity among devices. Social and policy implications for crisis response are examined in light of having technological barriers to sharing resources reduced. Human and other factors relevant to information sharing and collaboration are further examined through a case study of the Central New York Interoperable Communications Consortium (CNYICC) Network, a five-county collaboration involving law enforcement, public safety, government, and non-government participants. The three included essays have a common focus vis-à-vis information sharing and collaboration in law enforcement and emergency response. The propositions here include: (P1) Information sharing is affected by social, technical, and policy factors, and this conceptualization frames the problem of information sharing in a way that it can be commonly understood by government and non-government stakeholders. The next proposition involves the role of technology, policy, and social systems in information sharing: (P2) Social and policy factors influence information sharing more than technical factors (assuming it is physically possible to connect and/or share). A third proposition investigated is: (P3) Social factors play the greatest role in the creation and sustaining of information sharing… Advisors/Committee Members: Lee W. McKnight.

Subjects/Keywords: Collaboration; Communication; Cooperation; Information Sharing; Stigmergy; Trust; Library and Information Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Treglia, J. (2013). Three Essays on Law Enforcement and Emergency Response Information Sharing and Collaboration: An Insider Perspective. (Doctoral Dissertation). Syracuse University. Retrieved from https://surface.syr.edu/it_etd/84

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Treglia, Joseph. “Three Essays on Law Enforcement and Emergency Response Information Sharing and Collaboration: An Insider Perspective.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Syracuse University. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://surface.syr.edu/it_etd/84.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Treglia, Joseph. “Three Essays on Law Enforcement and Emergency Response Information Sharing and Collaboration: An Insider Perspective.” 2013. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Treglia J. Three Essays on Law Enforcement and Emergency Response Information Sharing and Collaboration: An Insider Perspective. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Syracuse University; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://surface.syr.edu/it_etd/84.

Council of Science Editors:

Treglia J. Three Essays on Law Enforcement and Emergency Response Information Sharing and Collaboration: An Insider Perspective. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Syracuse University; 2013. Available from: https://surface.syr.edu/it_etd/84

.