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You searched for +publisher:"Stellenbosch University" +contributor:("Liebenberg, S."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Stellenbosch University

1. Bannister, Tarryn. The right to have access to health care services for survivors of gender-based violence.

Degree: LLM, Public Law, 2012, Stellenbosch University

ENGLISH ABSTRACT: In South Africa gender-based violence (hereafter “GBV”) has reached extreme levels. This violent manifestation of gender inequality is compounded by the fact that women are disproportionately affected by poverty, the HIV/AIDS epidemic and inadequate health care services. This is in spite of South Africa’s progressive constitutional and legislative framework which appears highly conducive to combating gender inequality and GBV. For example, the Constitution protects the right to equality (section 9), human dignity (section 10), life (section 11), freedom and security of the person (section 12) and the right to have access to health care services, including reproductive health (section 27(1)(a)). Extensive legislation has also been enacted for the protection of women. For example, the preamble to the Domestic Violence Act 116 of 1998 (hereafter “DVA”) recognises domestic violence as a serious social evil. While the DVA is notably silent as to the role of the health care sector, the DVA is progressive in that it contains a broad definition of domestic violence, and recognises a wide range of relationships. The Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act 32 of 2007 also seeks to afford complainants of sexual offences “the maximum and least traumatising protection that the law can provide”. In addition to this, South Africa has international law obligations to address GBV and gender inequality. For example, under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (1979), States are obliged to address private acts of violence and to remove discrimination against women in all fields, including health. However, despite this progressive framework of rights, some interpretations of these integral rights have been unduly formalistic, in addition to being disengaged from the lived reality of many women. There is also a substantial gap between policy and practice, with the implementation of existing legislation a continuing problem. It is therefore imperative that we analyse the right to have access to health care services through a gender lens so as to transcend a purely legalistic perspective and to interrogate gendered social processes and power relations. This thesis analyses how existing law and policy can be transformed so as to be more responsive to these lived realities and needs of survivors of GBV.

AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Geslagsgebaseerde geweld (hierna ‘GGG’) in Suid-Afrika het uiterste vlakke bereik. Hierdie gewelddadige manifestasie van geslagsongelykheid word vererger deur die feit dat vroue buite verhouding erg deur armoede, die MIV/vigs-epidemie en ontoereikende gesondheidsorgdienste geraak word. Dit is ondanks Suid-Afrika se vooruitstrewende grondwetlike en wetsraamwerk wat op die oog af hoogs bevorderlik vir die bestryding van geslagsongelykheid en GGG voorkom. Die Grondwet verskans, byvoorbeeld, die reg op gelykheid (artikel 9), menswaardigheid (artikel 10), lewe (artikel 11), vryheid en sekerheid van die persoon (artikel 12) en toegang tot…

Advisors/Committee Members: Liebenberg, S., Stellenbosch University. Faculty of Law. Dept. of Public Law..

Subjects/Keywords: Law; Dissertations  – Law; Medical care  – Law and legislation  – South Africa; Health services accessibility  – South Africa; Discrimination against women  – Law and legislation  – South Africa; Women  – Violence against  – South Africa; Right to health  – South Africa; Department of Public Law

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bannister, T. (2012). The right to have access to health care services for survivors of gender-based violence. (Thesis). Stellenbosch University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/71802

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bannister, Tarryn. “The right to have access to health care services for survivors of gender-based violence.” 2012. Thesis, Stellenbosch University. Accessed December 11, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/71802.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bannister, Tarryn. “The right to have access to health care services for survivors of gender-based violence.” 2012. Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Bannister T. The right to have access to health care services for survivors of gender-based violence. [Internet] [Thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/71802.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bannister T. The right to have access to health care services for survivors of gender-based violence. [Thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/71802

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Stellenbosch University

2. Muller, Gustav. The impact of Section 26 of the Constitution on the eviction of squatters in South African law.

Degree: LLD, 2011, Stellenbosch University

ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This dissertation considers the housing rights of unlawful occupiers in the post-1994 constitutional dispensation. Section 26 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 affords everyone a right of access to adequate housing. This provision is a decisive break with the apartheid past, where forced eviction banished black people to the periphery of society. The central hypothesis of this dissertation is that the Constitution envisages the creation of a society that is committed to large-scale transformation. This dissertation posits that it is impossible to realise the full transformative potential of section 26 of the Constitution in the absence of an independent and substantive understanding of what it means to have access to adequate housing. This dissertation traverses legal theory as well as the common law of evictions, constitutional law and international law. A consciously interdisciplinary approach is adopted in seeking to develop the content of section 26 of the Constitution, drawing on literature from social and political science. This dissertation develops an organising framework for giving substantive content to section 26(1) of the Constitution with reference to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms; the Revised European Social Charter, the American Convention on Human Rights and the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights. This dissertation shows that the adjudication of eviction disputes has moved away from a position under the common law where Courts had no discretion to refuse eviction orders based on the personal circumstances of the squatters. The adjudication of the eviction of unlawful occupiers now requires a context-sensitive analysis that seeks to find concrete and case-specific solutions. These solutions are achieved by considering what would be just and equitable for both the land owner and the unlawful occupiers. This dissertation also shows that the government has a markedly different role to fulfil in post-apartheid evictions through the necessary joinder of local authorities to eviction proceedings, meaningful engagement with unlawful occupiers and the provision of alternative accommodation in terms of its constitutional and statutory obligations.

AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Hierdie proefskrif ondersoek die behuisingsregte van onregmatige okkupeerders in die post-1994 grondwetlike bedeling. Artikel 26 van die Grondwet van die Republiek van Suid-Afrika, 1996 gee elke persoon die reg op toegang tot geskikte behuising. Hierdie bepaling is ‘n duidelike breuk met die apartheid-verlede waar gedwonge uitsettings swart mense na die periferie van die samelewing verban het. Die sentrale hipotese van hierdie proefskrif is dat die Grondwet beoog om ‘n samelewing te skep wat verbind is tot grootskaalse transformasie. Hierdie proefskrif voer aan dat dit onmoontlik is om die volle transformerende potensiaal van artikel 26 van die…

Advisors/Committee Members: Liebenberg, S., Van der Walt, A. J., Stellenbosch University. Faculty of Law. Dept.of Public Law..

Subjects/Keywords: Public law; Dissertations  – Public law; Landlord and tenant  – South Africa.; Right to housing  – South Africa.; Discrimination in housing  – South Africa.; Squatter settlements  – South Africa.; Eviction  – South Africa.; Public Law

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Muller, G. (2011). The impact of Section 26 of the Constitution on the eviction of squatters in South African law. (Thesis). Stellenbosch University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/18122

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Muller, Gustav. “The impact of Section 26 of the Constitution on the eviction of squatters in South African law.” 2011. Thesis, Stellenbosch University. Accessed December 11, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/18122.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Muller, Gustav. “The impact of Section 26 of the Constitution on the eviction of squatters in South African law.” 2011. Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Muller G. The impact of Section 26 of the Constitution on the eviction of squatters in South African law. [Internet] [Thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/18122.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Muller G. The impact of Section 26 of the Constitution on the eviction of squatters in South African law. [Thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/18122

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.