Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Stellenbosch University" +contributor:("Cousins, Thomas"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Stellenbosch University

1. Dube, Charles. Zimbabwean migrants and the dynamics of religion and informal support associations in mediating everyday life in Cape Town.

Degree: PhD, Social Anthropology, 2017, Stellenbosch University

ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This ethnographic study is about Pentecostal spirituality and everyday social life among migrant members of Forward in Faith in Cape Town, South Africa. My focus is on the capacity of the church to reach into and shape individual congregants’ daily lives, through its various doctrines, moral instructions and forms of ‘social surveillance’. The study explores the extent to which individual believers conform to these injunctions in their daily social life both inside and outside the associational and formal context of the church. While much has been written about the effort made by Pentecostals to make a break with relations they had before conversion, and the challenges attendant to those attempts, this literature has not addressed the everyday social relations of believers in multiple and layered public and private spaces. I aim to critically engage contemporary scholarship on religion which assumes that born again Christians enact these church messages and injunctions into their daily lives in ways that influence their definitions and daily practices of social life. Is it possible that individual congregants may find ways to be convivial with non-congregants simply in order to get along with them? What does the church bring to the daily lives of its members? Is there a split or disjuncture between the spaces of the church and everyday life? What do other experiences outside of the church bring to the everyday lives of individual congregants? My findings indicate that in everyday life, people are pragmatic. Since congregants in my study lived in a socially diverse world, how their relations were built outside the church were informed by this diversity. For example, despite the existence of various social media platforms (WhatsApp and Facebook) to share information regarding accommodation, and job opportunities, most church members preferred to share apartments with non-church members. The desire to escape ‘social surveillance’ from fellow church members and leadership was one of the reasons for this preference. While they were aware of the church’s message about the ‘polluting’ world and the dangers of sharing social spaces with non-believers, in daily existence individual congregants arranged their lives and made decisions by themselves. In spaces outside the church, believers and non-believers sat together, ate together, travelled together in public transport and met in other public spaces. Through these mundane daily experiences, they arrived at an everyday ethics of conviviality. This study therefore concludes that, due to the complex social, cultural, economic and political environment Stellenbosch University within which the church operated in South Africa, it was limited in its capacity to influence church members’ daily lives

AFRIKAANS OPSOMMING: Hierdie etnografiese studie handel oor Pinksterspiritualiteit en die alledaagse sosiale lewe onder trekkers van Forward in Faith gebaseer in Kaapstad, Suid-Afrika. My fokus is op die kapasiteit van die kerk om uit te reik na en die individuele…

Advisors/Committee Members: Robins, Steven, Cousins, Thomas, Stellenbosch University. Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dept. of Social Anthropology..

Subjects/Keywords: Zimbabweans  – Migration; Zimbabweans  – Religion; Lifestyles  – Zimbabwe; UCTD

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dube, C. (2017). Zimbabwean migrants and the dynamics of religion and informal support associations in mediating everyday life in Cape Town. (Doctoral Dissertation). Stellenbosch University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/102690

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dube, Charles. “Zimbabwean migrants and the dynamics of religion and informal support associations in mediating everyday life in Cape Town.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Stellenbosch University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/102690.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dube, Charles. “Zimbabwean migrants and the dynamics of religion and informal support associations in mediating everyday life in Cape Town.” 2017. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Dube C. Zimbabwean migrants and the dynamics of religion and informal support associations in mediating everyday life in Cape Town. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Stellenbosch University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/102690.

Council of Science Editors:

Dube C. Zimbabwean migrants and the dynamics of religion and informal support associations in mediating everyday life in Cape Town. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Stellenbosch University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/102690


Stellenbosch University

2. Raad, Rene. Nursing the stigma : conflicting realities of abortion.

Degree: MA, Sociology and Social Anthropology, 2018, Stellenbosch University

ENGLISH ABSTRACT: In 1996, South African women gained the right to exercise “control over their bodies” through the Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act (CTOPA). This was a crucial advance for women, as it represented the recognition of reproductive rights by South Africa’s first democratically elected government. In 2018, despite having this public service available, many South African women still seek out informal abortion services or pay to have their pregnancy terminated at private healthcare facilities. With the legal framework of the CTOPA supporting a woman’s right to terminate her pregnancy, there should be little need for additional services outside of the public healthcare sector, yet the large number of advertisements for unaccredited abortion services plastered on the walls of public transport and lamp posts suggest otherwise. Various explanations are offered for why women do not make use of state-sanctioned, formal abortion services, including social stigmatization, religious dissuasion, and lack of knowledge of available services. Another possible reason that deters South African women seeking to safely terminate their pregnancies is that public healthcare providers leave women feeling degraded and ashamed. In this thesis, however, I examine the experiences and perspectives of those who are involved in providing safe and legal abortion services and explore how these providers navigate the moral ambiguities of a woman’s right to choose. By spending time in three non-governmental organization healthcare facilities, I reflect on the experiences of Termination of Pregnancy providers in their everyday life – experiences that are constituted and mediated by the various collectives with whom they identify and in which they form their individual moral codes. I do this to understand better how ethical and moral dilemmas are negotiated and how this shapes the understanding of what it means to access the right to safe and legal termination of pregnancy.

AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: In 1996 het Suid-Afrikaanse vroue die reg gekry om ‘beheer oor hul liggame’ uit te oefen deur die Wet op Keuse oor die Beëindiging van Swangerskap. Dit was baie belangrike vooruitgang vir vroue, aangesien dit die erkenning van voortplantingsregte deur Suid-Afrika se eerste demokraties verkose regering verteenwoordig het. Ondanks die beskikbaarheid van hierdie openbare diens, versoek talle Suid-Afrikaanse vroue in 2018 steeds informele aborsiedienste of betaal om hul swangerskap by privaat gesondheidsorgfasiliteite te laat beëindig. Aangesien die regsraamwerk van bogenoemde wet vroue se reg om hul swangerskap te beëindig, ondersteun, behoort daar min behoefte te wees aan bykomende dienste buite die openbare gesondheidsorgsektor, tog dui die groot hoeveelheid advertensies vir ongeakkrediteerde aborsiedienste wat wyd en syd op die mure van openbare vervoer en lamppale geplak word op die teendeel. Verskeie verduidelikings word voorgehou waarom vroue nie gebruik maak van staatsgoedgekeurde, formele…

Advisors/Committee Members: Cousins, Thomas, Stellenbosch University. Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dept. of Sociology and Social Anthropology..

Subjects/Keywords: Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act (CTOPA)  – South Africa; Abortion  – South Africa; Nursing the stigma; UCTD

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Raad, R. (2018). Nursing the stigma : conflicting realities of abortion. (Masters Thesis). Stellenbosch University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/104993

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Raad, Rene. “Nursing the stigma : conflicting realities of abortion.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Stellenbosch University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/104993.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Raad, Rene. “Nursing the stigma : conflicting realities of abortion.” 2018. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Raad R. Nursing the stigma : conflicting realities of abortion. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/104993.

Council of Science Editors:

Raad R. Nursing the stigma : conflicting realities of abortion. [Masters Thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/104993

.