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You searched for +publisher:"South Dakota State University" +contributor:("Gary P. Van Guilder"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Kaur, Gungeet. Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning on Exercise Economy.

Degree: MS, Health and Nutritional Sciences, 2016, South Dakota State University

Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is the application of small bouts of ischemia followed by reperfusion. IPC has shown to enhance exercise performance in varied sports like 5K running, cycling and swimming. However, effect of ischemic preconditioning on running economy have not be investigated so far. We proposed that bilateral ischemic preconditioning will improve running economy in young healthy people. Methods: The study was a randomized single- blinded crossover study. Nineteen men and women were included in the study. Each participant underwent a sham and IPC trial using high pressure cuff (EC20 rapid cuff inflator, DE Hokanson, Inc.) followed by running economy trial (Parvo Medics, TrueOne 2400) of 15 minutes. The sham or IPC trial consisted of 3X 5 min of bilateral leg ischemic at pressure of 15 mm of Hg (sham) or 220 mm of Hg (IPC). Each 5 min stage of bilateral leg ischemia was followed by 5 minutes of reperfusion which was followed by 3X 5 min of submaximal treadmill running. Results The data was completed and analyzed for 18 subjects. The mean age of participants was 27+7 years with BMI for all subjects was 24.6± 3.0 kg/m2. A two way ANOVA was used to assess interaction in running economy (i.e., steady-state oxygen consumption, respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate) in the absence and presence of IPC. In the sham running trial, oxygen consumption progressively increased 22% (P Advisors/Committee Members: Gary P. Van Guilder.

Subjects/Keywords: Sports Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Kaur, G. (2016). Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning on Exercise Economy. (Masters Thesis). South Dakota State University. Retrieved from http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/955

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kaur, Gungeet. “Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning on Exercise Economy.” 2016. Masters Thesis, South Dakota State University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/955.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kaur, Gungeet. “Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning on Exercise Economy.” 2016. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Kaur G. Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning on Exercise Economy. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/955.

Council of Science Editors:

Kaur G. Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning on Exercise Economy. [Masters Thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2016. Available from: http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/955

2. Trachte, Tiffany. Influence of Cardiovascular Risk factors on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning.

Degree: MS, Health and Nutritional Sciences, 2016, South Dakota State University

A powerful therapy against microvascular endothelial ischemia-reperfusion injury is remote ischemic preconditioning (rIPC), which triggers tissue protection by exposing a limb to small cycles of vascular occlusion. Animal models indicate that CVD risk factors reduce the protective benefits of ischemic conditioning. However, there are no human studies investigating how a burden of risk factors interferes with rIPC to prevent endothelial injury. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of risk factor burden on the capacity of rIPC to prevent endothelial reperfusion injury in humans. Twenty-two (age: 45±14 yr., BMI: 31±8 kg/m2) sedentary adults (12 lower burden: ≤2 risk factors; 10 raised burden: 3-5 risk factors) were studied. Digital arterial tonometry (EndoPAT 2000, Itamar Medical Inc.) was used to assess microvascular endothelial vasodilation during reactive hyperemia before and after 65 min of left arm reperfusion injury (20 min brachial artery ischemia followed by 45 min reperfusion) that was preceded by rIPC (right arm: 3X5 min ischemia/reperfusion). All subjects provided written informed consent according to the Internal Review Board guidelines at South Dakota State University. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to assess group differences between the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) before and after reperfusion injury. Statistical significance was set at P Advisors/Committee Members: Gary P. Van Guilder.

Subjects/Keywords: Exercise Physiology; Exercise Science; Medicine and Health Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Trachte, T. (2016). Influence of Cardiovascular Risk factors on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning. (Masters Thesis). South Dakota State University. Retrieved from http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/983

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Trachte, Tiffany. “Influence of Cardiovascular Risk factors on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning.” 2016. Masters Thesis, South Dakota State University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/983.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Trachte, Tiffany. “Influence of Cardiovascular Risk factors on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning.” 2016. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Trachte T. Influence of Cardiovascular Risk factors on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/983.

Council of Science Editors:

Trachte T. Influence of Cardiovascular Risk factors on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning. [Masters Thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2016. Available from: http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/983

3. Rachel, Shelby. Menstrual Cycle and the Vascular Properties of Remote Preconditioning.

Degree: MS, Health and Nutritional Sciences, 2019, South Dakota State University

PURPOSE: A promising therapeutic intervention to counteract endothelial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Limited data from ovariectomized animal models shows that estrogen deficiency abolishes the cardioprotective effects of IPC, whereas estrogen replacement restores protection. This suggests that alterations in female sex hormones, particularly estrogens, that occur naturally during the menstrual cycle is likely to influence the vascular protective properties of IPC. The aim of the present study was to identify how changes in female sex hormones that occur naturally during the menstrual cycle interfere with IPC to provide vascular endothelial protection in women. METHODS: Nine healthy premenopausal eumenorrheic women (age 21±1 yr) not taking any contraceptive medications were studied in a within-subjects design. Primary outcomes with respect to the assessment of vascular endothelial function were measured during the early follicular (after onset of menses; days 1- 6) and at mid-cycle during ovulation (days 10-14 after positive urine ovulation test). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by the forearm blood flow (FBF) response to reactive hyperemia using strain-gauge venous occlusion plethysmography in the absence and presence of endothelial I/R injury (20 min brachial artery ischemia followed by 15 min reperfusion) when preceded by remote IPC (right arm: 3×5 min cycles of ischemia). RESULTS: In the absence of endothelial I/R injury, peak FBF to reactive hyperemia was similar (P=0.19) between the early follicular (19.9±6.1 ml/100ml tissue/min) and ovulation phases (22.1±5.9 ml/100ml tissue/min). In contrast, there was a significant main effect (P=0.001) of menstrual cycle phase on the capacity of IPC to protect against endothelial I/R injury. For example, during the early follicular phase, peak FBF was significantly (P=0.02) diminished 15% with endothelial I/R injury (from: 19.9±6.1 to 17.1±4.1 ml/100ml tissue/min) despite remote IPC. As a result, total FBF during the initial 30 sec of reactive hyperemia (area under the curve) was decreased ~18% (P=0.027) after (41.0±11.4 ml/100ml tissue/min) compared with before (49.6±15.1 ml/100ml tissue/min) endothelial I/R injury. However, during ovulation, remote IPC provided a level of endothelial protection from I/R injury that was not observed in the early follicular phase. Indeed, in the presence of endothelial I/R injury, peak FBF increased 15% (from: 22.1±5.9 to 25.3±6.4 ml/100ml tissue/min; P=0.012). As a result, total FBF was well preserved (P=0.859) after (58.2±14.6 ml/100ml tissue/min) compared with before (58.0±13.3 ml/100 ml tissue/min) endothelial I/R injury. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the menstrual cycle differentially influences the capacity of remote IPC to protect against endothelial I/R injury. Greater circulating estrogens during ovulation may be an important mediator contributing to the protective benefits of remote IPC in women. Advisors/Committee Members: Gary P. Van Guilder.

Subjects/Keywords: endothelial function; menstrual cycle; remote ishemic preconditioning; vascular; vascular endothelial health; Physiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rachel, S. (2019). Menstrual Cycle and the Vascular Properties of Remote Preconditioning. (Masters Thesis). South Dakota State University. Retrieved from https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/3267

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rachel, Shelby. “Menstrual Cycle and the Vascular Properties of Remote Preconditioning.” 2019. Masters Thesis, South Dakota State University. Accessed November 22, 2019. https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/3267.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rachel, Shelby. “Menstrual Cycle and the Vascular Properties of Remote Preconditioning.” 2019. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Rachel S. Menstrual Cycle and the Vascular Properties of Remote Preconditioning. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2019. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/3267.

Council of Science Editors:

Rachel S. Menstrual Cycle and the Vascular Properties of Remote Preconditioning. [Masters Thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2019. Available from: https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/3267

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