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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Vershon, Andrew"). Showing records 1 – 9 of 9 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Hammond, Gifty Naa Ayeley, 1981-. Defining the nanoRNA regulon and the mechanism by which gene expression is controlled and manifested.

Degree: MS, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2014, Rutgers University

 Gene transcription is mediated by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP). RNAP is a multi subunit nucleotidyl transferase that polymerizes ribonucleotides at the 3’ end of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Gene expression; Genetic regulation; Reverse transcriptase

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APA (6th Edition):

Hammond, Gifty Naa Ayeley, 1. (2014). Defining the nanoRNA regulon and the mechanism by which gene expression is controlled and manifested. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/42394/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hammond, Gifty Naa Ayeley, 1981-. “Defining the nanoRNA regulon and the mechanism by which gene expression is controlled and manifested.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed May 09, 2021. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/42394/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hammond, Gifty Naa Ayeley, 1981-. “Defining the nanoRNA regulon and the mechanism by which gene expression is controlled and manifested.” 2014. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Hammond, Gifty Naa Ayeley 1. Defining the nanoRNA regulon and the mechanism by which gene expression is controlled and manifested. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2014. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/42394/.

Council of Science Editors:

Hammond, Gifty Naa Ayeley 1. Defining the nanoRNA regulon and the mechanism by which gene expression is controlled and manifested. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2014. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/42394/

2. Cesario, Jeffry, 1981-. Analysis of the initiation of acentrosomal spindle assembly in Drosophila melanogaster.

Degree: PhD, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2010, Rutgers University

In many species, meiotic spindles assemble microtubules in the absence of centrosomes. An acentrosomal mechanism has been proposed where the chromosomes initiate spindle assembly by… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Drosophila melanogaster; Spindle (Cell division); Microtubules

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APA (6th Edition):

Cesario, Jeffry, 1. (2010). Analysis of the initiation of acentrosomal spindle assembly in Drosophila melanogaster. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056208

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cesario, Jeffry, 1981-. “Analysis of the initiation of acentrosomal spindle assembly in Drosophila melanogaster.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056208.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cesario, Jeffry, 1981-. “Analysis of the initiation of acentrosomal spindle assembly in Drosophila melanogaster.” 2010. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Cesario, Jeffry 1. Analysis of the initiation of acentrosomal spindle assembly in Drosophila melanogaster. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2010. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056208.

Council of Science Editors:

Cesario, Jeffry 1. Analysis of the initiation of acentrosomal spindle assembly in Drosophila melanogaster. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056208

3. Stivers, Peter J., 1985-. Adaptation and regulation of fatty acid composition in candida albicans in response to environmental conditions.

Degree: MS, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2011, Rutgers University

 Candida albicans is a commensal fungus that grows in the mammalian gut at a constant temperature of 37 °C. Like most fungi, Candida albicans membranes… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Candida albicans; Fatty acids

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APA (6th Edition):

Stivers, Peter J., 1. (2011). Adaptation and regulation of fatty acid composition in candida albicans in response to environmental conditions. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061519

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stivers, Peter J., 1985-. “Adaptation and regulation of fatty acid composition in candida albicans in response to environmental conditions.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061519.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stivers, Peter J., 1985-. “Adaptation and regulation of fatty acid composition in candida albicans in response to environmental conditions.” 2011. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Stivers, Peter J. 1. Adaptation and regulation of fatty acid composition in candida albicans in response to environmental conditions. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2011. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061519.

Council of Science Editors:

Stivers, Peter J. 1. Adaptation and regulation of fatty acid composition in candida albicans in response to environmental conditions. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061519

4. Gelfand, Brian Nathan, 1979-. Antisense transcription regulates gene expression in saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Degree: PhD, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2011, Rutgers University

The yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has previously been shown to have a transcriptome comprising over 6,000 protein coding genes, as well as over 900 noncoding RNAs… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Saccharomyces cerevisiae – Metabolism – Genetic aspects

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APA (6th Edition):

Gelfand, Brian Nathan, 1. (2011). Antisense transcription regulates gene expression in saccharomyces cerevisiae. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061207

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gelfand, Brian Nathan, 1979-. “Antisense transcription regulates gene expression in saccharomyces cerevisiae.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061207.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gelfand, Brian Nathan, 1979-. “Antisense transcription regulates gene expression in saccharomyces cerevisiae.” 2011. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Gelfand, Brian Nathan 1. Antisense transcription regulates gene expression in saccharomyces cerevisiae. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2011. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061207.

Council of Science Editors:

Gelfand, Brian Nathan 1. Antisense transcription regulates gene expression in saccharomyces cerevisiae. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061207


Rutgers University

5. Adornato, Philip, 1975-. Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom.

Degree: MS, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2010, Rutgers University

 Incorporating research into a high school classroom is an excellent way to teach students fundamental concepts in science. One program that incorporates this approach is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Science – Study and teaching (Secondary); High school students – Research; Molecular biology – Research

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APA (6th Edition):

Adornato, Philip, 1. (2010). Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056147

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Adornato, Philip, 1975-. “Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056147.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Adornato, Philip, 1975-. “Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom.” 2010. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Adornato, Philip 1. Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2010. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056147.

Council of Science Editors:

Adornato, Philip 1. Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056147


Rutgers University

6. Bhanot, Tamanna Devraj. Evolution of a novel gene pair from a canonical toxin-antitoxin module in Escherichia coli.

Degree: MS, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2008, Rutgers University

 Free-living bacteria are continuously subjected to environmental stress. This stress can be in the form of a change in temperature, pH, osmolarity or nutritional starvation.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Toxins; Antitoxins; Escherichia coli

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APA (6th Edition):

Bhanot, T. D. (2008). Evolution of a novel gene pair from a canonical toxin-antitoxin module in Escherichia coli. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17439

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bhanot, Tamanna Devraj. “Evolution of a novel gene pair from a canonical toxin-antitoxin module in Escherichia coli.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17439.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bhanot, Tamanna Devraj. “Evolution of a novel gene pair from a canonical toxin-antitoxin module in Escherichia coli.” 2008. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Bhanot TD. Evolution of a novel gene pair from a canonical toxin-antitoxin module in Escherichia coli. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2008. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17439.

Council of Science Editors:

Bhanot TD. Evolution of a novel gene pair from a canonical toxin-antitoxin module in Escherichia coli. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17439


Rutgers University

7. Wittig, Stacey Lynn, 1979-. A snapshot of the Artemia genome: to code or not to code.

Degree: MS, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2009, Rutgers University

 The Waksman Student Scholars Program, along with the Introduction to Molecular Biology and Biochemical Research class, were responsible for the publication of 628 Artemia sequences.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Artemia – Genetics; Genomes

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APA (6th Edition):

Wittig, Stacey Lynn, 1. (2009). A snapshot of the Artemia genome: to code or not to code. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051922

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wittig, Stacey Lynn, 1979-. “A snapshot of the Artemia genome: to code or not to code.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051922.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wittig, Stacey Lynn, 1979-. “A snapshot of the Artemia genome: to code or not to code.” 2009. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Wittig, Stacey Lynn 1. A snapshot of the Artemia genome: to code or not to code. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2009. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051922.

Council of Science Editors:

Wittig, Stacey Lynn 1. A snapshot of the Artemia genome: to code or not to code. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051922


Rutgers University

8. Arnold, Nicole, 1980-. Activation of the rat luteinizing hormone following substitution of treonine-413 with selective residues.

Degree: MS, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2010, Rutgers University

 The glycoprotein hormones lutropin (LH), follitropin (FSH) and thyrotropin (TSH) control the many functions of the ovaries, testes and thyroid (27). Humans have two lutropins,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Glycoprotein hormones; Amino acids

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APA (6th Edition):

Arnold, Nicole, 1. (2010). Activation of the rat luteinizing hormone following substitution of treonine-413 with selective residues. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053490

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arnold, Nicole, 1980-. “Activation of the rat luteinizing hormone following substitution of treonine-413 with selective residues.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053490.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arnold, Nicole, 1980-. “Activation of the rat luteinizing hormone following substitution of treonine-413 with selective residues.” 2010. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Arnold, Nicole 1. Activation of the rat luteinizing hormone following substitution of treonine-413 with selective residues. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2010. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053490.

Council of Science Editors:

Arnold, Nicole 1. Activation of the rat luteinizing hormone following substitution of treonine-413 with selective residues. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053490


Rutgers University

9. Tuberty-Vaughan, Lynda, 1967-. Structure-function analysis of the non-helicase domain of Sgs1, the Bloom Syndrome ortholog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Degree: MS, Cell and Developmental Biology, 2011, Rutgers University

 Bloom’s Syndrome (BS) is a rare human disease characterized by genome instability and cancer predispostion. The gene mutated in BS, BLM, encodes a member of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Genomics; Oncogenic DNA viruses

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APA (6th Edition):

Tuberty-Vaughan, Lynda, 1. (2011). Structure-function analysis of the non-helicase domain of Sgs1, the Bloom Syndrome ortholog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061532

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tuberty-Vaughan, Lynda, 1967-. “Structure-function analysis of the non-helicase domain of Sgs1, the Bloom Syndrome ortholog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061532.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tuberty-Vaughan, Lynda, 1967-. “Structure-function analysis of the non-helicase domain of Sgs1, the Bloom Syndrome ortholog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.” 2011. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Tuberty-Vaughan, Lynda 1. Structure-function analysis of the non-helicase domain of Sgs1, the Bloom Syndrome ortholog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2011. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061532.

Council of Science Editors:

Tuberty-Vaughan, Lynda 1. Structure-function analysis of the non-helicase domain of Sgs1, the Bloom Syndrome ortholog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000061532

.