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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Turpin, Barbara J."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Tan, Yi, 1983-. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from aqueous OH radical oxidation of dicarbonyl compounds in the atmosphere.

Degree: PhD, Environmental Sciences, 2010, Rutgers University

Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) affect visibility, health and global climate. Current chemical transport models cannot represent SOA in the free troposphere. Fog/cloud processing, which is the dominant source of atmospheric sulfate, has been recognized as a missing source of SOA globally. Aqueous photooxidation of water-soluble products (e.g., glyoxal and methylglyoxal) of gas-phase photochemistry yields low-volatility compounds including oxalic acid. When this chemistry takes place in clouds and fogs followed by droplet evaporation (or if this chemistry occurs in aerosol water) then products remain in part in the particle phase, forming SOA. However, current aqueous SOA formation mechanism has not shown how the starting concentrations of precursors and presence of acidic sulfate affect product formation. Aqueous phase photochemical batch reactions were conducted with glyoxal and methylglyoxal at cloud relevant concentrations, using hydrogen peroxide photolysis as the hydroxyl radical (∙OH) source. Experiments were repeated at higher concentrations and with/without sulfuric acid. Precursors and products were investigated using ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and IC-ESI-MS. Products included carboxylic acids and higher molecular weight compounds, which are major constituents of aerosols. Sulfuric acid shows little effect on product formation. Dilute aqueous chemistry models successfully reproduced product formation for glyoxal and methylglyoxal at cloud relevant conditions, but measurements deviated from predictions from predictions at elevated concentrations. Higher molecular weight products become increasingly important as precursor concentration increases. Aqueous radical-radical reactions provide explanations for observed higher molecular weight products. Additionally, acetic acid is identified as an SOA precursor for the first time. This work provides an improved understanding of aqueous phase dicarbonyl oxidation mechanism and the overall significance of aqueous SOA formation. Kinetic data are made available to regional and global atmospheric models, and the mechanism described in this work will help people to mitigate adverse aerosol effects.

Advisors/Committee Members: Tan, Yi, 1983- (author), Turpin, Barbara J. (chair), Reinfelder, John (internal member), Seitzinger, Sybil P. (internal member), Carlton, Ann Marie (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Aerosols – Health aspects; Atmospheric aerosols – Research

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tan, Yi, 1. (2010). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from aqueous OH radical oxidation of dicarbonyl compounds in the atmosphere. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056804

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tan, Yi, 1983-. “Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from aqueous OH radical oxidation of dicarbonyl compounds in the atmosphere.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed July 20, 2019. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056804.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tan, Yi, 1983-. “Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from aqueous OH radical oxidation of dicarbonyl compounds in the atmosphere.” 2010. Web. 20 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Tan, Yi 1. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from aqueous OH radical oxidation of dicarbonyl compounds in the atmosphere. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2010. [cited 2019 Jul 20]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056804.

Council of Science Editors:

Tan, Yi 1. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from aqueous OH radical oxidation of dicarbonyl compounds in the atmosphere. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056804

2. Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L., 1984-. Quantifying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud chemistry and cloud droplet evaporation.

Degree: Environmental Sciences, 2013, Rutgers University

Subjects/Keywords: Atmospheric aerosols; Atmospheric chemistry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L., 1. (2013). Quantifying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud chemistry and cloud droplet evaporation. (Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068929

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L., 1984-. “Quantifying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud chemistry and cloud droplet evaporation.” 2013. Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed July 20, 2019. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068929.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L., 1984-. “Quantifying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud chemistry and cloud droplet evaporation.” 2013. Web. 20 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L. 1. Quantifying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud chemistry and cloud droplet evaporation. [Internet] [Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2013. [cited 2019 Jul 20]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068929.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L. 1. Quantifying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud chemistry and cloud droplet evaporation. [Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068929

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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