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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Toledo, Alvaro"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Allan, Rachael. Process of creating a more efficient real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia miyamotoi that inhabit deer ticks.

Degree: MS, Microbial Biology, 2019, Rutgers University

Ixodes scapularis, the most abundant tick species in New Jersey, is a vector for a host of human diseases, including Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, and B. miyamotoi. The prevalence of these diseases continues to steadily increase, and it has become critical to develop molecular methods to detect them. This project focuses on transitioning from a standard PCR and gel electrophoresis methodology to real-time PCR to screen for four common pathogens found in deer ticks – B. burgdorferi, B. miyamotoi, A. phagocytophilum, and B. microti. Primers and probes were created to target genes that were unique to each pathogen. They were tested using standard PCR and gel electrophoresis and were then optimized with real-time PCR using SYBR Green and TaqMan methodologies. The primer specificity was also assessed using tick DNA as a template utilizing a SYBR Green methodology. 158 deer ticks were tested for the presence of pathogens – 11.39% of deer ticks tested positive for B. burgdorferi, 6.33% tested positive for B. microti, 6.96% tested positive for B. miyamotoi, and 10.76% tested positive for A. phagocytophilum. With all of these steps completed, a multiplex PCR assay can be created to screen for all four pathogens in one single test tube. Advisors/Committee Members: Toledo, Alvaro (chair), Zylstra, Gerben (internal member), Kerkhof, Lee (internal member), School of Graduate Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: Tick-borne diseases  – Testing; Anaplasmosis  – Testing; Babesiosis  – Testing; Borrelia burgdorferi  – Testing; Borrelia  – Testing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Allan, R. (2019). Process of creating a more efficient real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia miyamotoi that inhabit deer ticks. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60584/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Allan, Rachael. “Process of creating a more efficient real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia miyamotoi that inhabit deer ticks.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed November 25, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60584/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Allan, Rachael. “Process of creating a more efficient real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia miyamotoi that inhabit deer ticks.” 2019. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Allan R. Process of creating a more efficient real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia miyamotoi that inhabit deer ticks. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2019. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60584/.

Council of Science Editors:

Allan R. Process of creating a more efficient real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia miyamotoi that inhabit deer ticks. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2019. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60584/


Rutgers University

2. Al-Tameemi, Hassan Mohammed Jasim, 1977-. Transition metals homeostasis in Staphylococcus aureus.

Degree: PhD, Microbial Biology, 2019, Rutgers University

Staphylococcus aureus is a public health concern. It can evade the immune system and develop resistance to many antibiotic classes. The human immune system employs diverse mechanisms to overcome S. aureus infections including disrupting iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) homeostasis at the host-pathogen interface. The work presented herein described iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster synthesis as a potential antimicrobial target. We demonstrated that Suf (sulfur mobilization)-dependent Fe-S cluster synthesis is essential in S. aureus. Importantly, the Suf system is not present in mammals suggesting that it is a promising antibiotic target. A strain with decreased suf transcription exhibited phenotypes that are associated with impaired Fe-S protein maturation. These phenotypes included a reduction in the activity of Fe-S cluster-dependent enzymes and growth inhibition in media deficient in metabolites that require Fe-S enzymes for synthesis. The impairment in Fe-S cluster biogenesis led to increased sensitivity to reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species and decreased survival in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. We explored how copper harm S. aureus, by creating a ΔcopAB ΔcopBL strain (cop-) that was defective in removing copper from the cytosol. We isolated cop- strains with Tn insertions in mntABC that resist copper. When cultured with copper, strains containing the mntA::Tn mutation had less copper load than the parent strains. Manganese bound MntR repressed MntABC. The ?mntR strain had reduced growth and increased copper load under copper stress. The introduction of the mntA::Tn allele annulled these phenotypes. Over-expression of MntABC amplified cellular copper load and sensitivity to copper. The mntA::Tn mutation presence also protected Fe-S enzymes from inactivation by copper. We also found that copper was not substantially inhibiting the growth of S. aureus by poisoning NrdEF under the growth conditions utilized; however, when NrdEF function was decreased by copper, the ribonucleotide reductase function is decreased by the addition of hydroxyurea. The introduction of a mntA::Tn allele improved growth of both ΔcopAZ and ΔcopBL strains from copper intoxication suggesting that the presence of a second copper detoxification system protects S. aureus from MntABC-dependent copper intoxication. The data presented are consistent with a model wherein copper enters S. aureus cells via the MntABC importer and poisons Fe-S enzymes. Taken together, the work presented in this thesis supports the viability of targeting Fe-S synthesis as a viable therapeutic approach and established a novel role for mntABC in copper homeostasis.

Advisors/Committee Members: Boyd, Jeffrey M (chair), Zylstra, Gerben J (internal member), Barkay, Tamar (internal member), Toledo, Alvaro (outside member), School of Graduate Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: Metals homeostasis; Staphylococcus aureus

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Al-Tameemi, Hassan Mohammed Jasim, 1. (2019). Transition metals homeostasis in Staphylococcus aureus. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/61680/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Al-Tameemi, Hassan Mohammed Jasim, 1977-. “Transition metals homeostasis in Staphylococcus aureus.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed November 25, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/61680/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Al-Tameemi, Hassan Mohammed Jasim, 1977-. “Transition metals homeostasis in Staphylococcus aureus.” 2019. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Al-Tameemi, Hassan Mohammed Jasim 1. Transition metals homeostasis in Staphylococcus aureus. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/61680/.

Council of Science Editors:

Al-Tameemi, Hassan Mohammed Jasim 1. Transition metals homeostasis in Staphylococcus aureus. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/61680/

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