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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Takacs, Sarolta A."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Fomin, Andriy. How Dio wrote history: Dio Cassius’ intellectual, historical, and literary techniques.

Degree: PhD, Classics, 2015, Rutgers University

This dissertation explores the process of history-writing by Dio Cassius through comparative literary historiographic analysis. By examining Dio’s Roman History as an integral historiographic endeavor, the dissertation attempts to reconstruct Dio’s overarching methodology. This task is achieved through the analysis of Dio’s own editorial asides and the comparison of Dio with parallel historical accounts, as well as by means of observing consistent features in Dio’s compositional design. The dissertation addresses such aspects of Dio’s methodology as his critical approach to sources, his principles involved in selection, reworking, and presentation of the historical material, his treatment of variant versions, and his use of literary allusions. A more in-depth discussion is devoted both to the role which dreams, portents, and prodigies, as well as wisdom expressions play in the system of causation developed by Dio, and to the historiography of Dio’s speeches. The dissertation revisits the traditional preconceptions regarding Dio’s extensive reliance on Thucydides, and in particular subjects to a systematic critique the hypothesis that Dio shared a Thucydidean pessimistic view of human nature, perceived as a constant. The dissertation analyzes the multi-step procedure of Dio’s causation and his emphasis on retrospective logical analysis of the motivations of influential individuals which determine the outcomes of the historical events. A systematic treatment of the typology, function, and patterns of presentation of speeches in Dio is undertaken in the concluding part of the study. This discussion revisits the traditional dichotomy in interpretation of Dio’s speeches (whether they are just rhetorical set-pieces akin to the progymnasmata of the rhetorical schools or they truly represent the author’s own views) and points toward new interpretative directions which take into consideration other types of intellectual discourse of the period, including those formed by the system of formal rhetorical education. The dissertation draws a portrait of the historical work of Dio Cassius as a mirror of the intellectual and cultural preoccupations of his own time. It treats the Roman History of Dio Cassius as belonging simultaneously to many intellectual orbits: in cultural sense, to both the Greek and the Roman worlds; in generic, linguistic, and literary sense — both to the traditions of classical Attic historiography and to new intellectual trends brought forth by the spirit of the Second Sophistic.

Advisors/Committee Members: Takacs, Sarolta A. (chair), Figueira, Thomas J. (internal member), Connolly, Serena (internal member), Rutherford, Ian (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Style, Literary; Rome – History; History, Ancient; Cassius Dio Cocceianus – Criticism and interpretation

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APA (6th Edition):

Fomin, A. (2015). How Dio wrote history: Dio Cassius’ intellectual, historical, and literary techniques. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/46337/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fomin, Andriy. “How Dio wrote history: Dio Cassius’ intellectual, historical, and literary techniques.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed August 11, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/46337/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fomin, Andriy. “How Dio wrote history: Dio Cassius’ intellectual, historical, and literary techniques.” 2015. Web. 11 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Fomin A. How Dio wrote history: Dio Cassius’ intellectual, historical, and literary techniques. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. [cited 2020 Aug 11]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/46337/.

Council of Science Editors:

Fomin A. How Dio wrote history: Dio Cassius’ intellectual, historical, and literary techniques. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/46337/


Rutgers University

2. Scott, Andrew G. Change and discontinuity within the Severan dynasty: the case of Macrinus.

Degree: PhD, Classics, 2008, Rutgers University

This dissertation examines the figure of Macrinus and his relationship to the Severan dynasty and the third century. As a usurper and non-aristocratic eques, Macrinus presents a problem of continuity within the Severan dynasty and in many ways was the precursor to the so-called "Third Century Crisis" of 235-285. The opening chapters of this dissertation examine the state of Caracalla's foreign and domestic policy at the end of his reign (primarily 215-217), Caracalla's assassination, and Macrinus' accession. There is also a discussion of Macrinus' career prior to his accession and his initial consolidation of power. A central question is how Macrinus legitimized his reign. The evidence, which includes literary, epigraphic, and numismatic sources, shows that he planned a familial succession that would be passed down to his son Diadumenian. Determining how Macrinus expressed his relationship both with the Severans and with his own son is critical for understanding how he tried to situate himself, as usurper, within the ruling family. A further area of importance is Macrinus' program. Though detractors have suggested that the brevity of Macrinus' reign made it impossible to have a coherent program, even in a short reign development can be traced. Macrinus was left with a variety of problems due to the failed policies of Caracalla, and it will be the purpose of this study to assess how he attempted to correct these missteps and how he developed his own policies. Finally, Macrinus was a victim of the struggle for power among the army, the equestrian bureaucracy, and the imperial family. An aspect of the illegitimate nature of Macrinus' reign was the almost instantaneous competition from the Syrian half of the house of Severus, orchestrated by the female relatives of Julia Domna. An investigation into the characters surrounding this power struggle, with particular emphasis on the women of the Severan line, will illuminate the inner workings of imperial families in this period and the power that women could wield.

Advisors/Committee Members: Scott, Andrew G. (author), Brennan, T. Corey (chair), Figueira, Thomas J. (internal member), Takacs, Sarolta A. (internal member), Metcalf, William E. (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Rome – History – Macrinus; 217-218

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APA (6th Edition):

Scott, A. G. (2008). Change and discontinuity within the Severan dynasty: the case of Macrinus. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17386

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scott, Andrew G. “Change and discontinuity within the Severan dynasty: the case of Macrinus.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed August 11, 2020. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17386.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scott, Andrew G. “Change and discontinuity within the Severan dynasty: the case of Macrinus.” 2008. Web. 11 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Scott AG. Change and discontinuity within the Severan dynasty: the case of Macrinus. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2008. [cited 2020 Aug 11]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17386.

Council of Science Editors:

Scott AG. Change and discontinuity within the Severan dynasty: the case of Macrinus. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17386


Rutgers University

3. Hoerl, Alexandra Elizabeth. The necessity of inspiration and the crisis of modern political communication.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2008, Rutgers University

My dissertation seeks to fully recover one of the most important elements of republicanism – and yet an element of republicanism that is overlooked in most of the literature – persuasive political rhetoric ("rhetoric-as-movere") in order to improve political communication and participation in the United States. Through rhetoric-as-movere is not without its problems, I argue that it has two major advantages over the type of political communication necessitated by strict deliberative democracy, a type of political communication that I suggest is rooted in "rhetoric-as-docere," a tradition that developed alongside the rise of scientific empiricism in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: it is better at drawing out action from novice citizens because it does a better job than deliberative democracy of dealing with the barriers to political entry, and it is more inclusive. Rhetoric-as-movere allows an orator to explicitly make use of all the persuasive tools at his or her disposal. While it is true that these tools are at times contrary to "rationality," throughout history they have always been the first recourse of leaders and movements truly concerned with popular participation. I demonstrate this affinity between rhetoric-as-movere and popular participation through an historical survey of movements ranging from 14th century English peasant revolts to 20th century American civil rights movements. I also analyze the development of the rhetoric-as-docere tradition in thinkers like Hobbes, Smith and Hume. I conclude that the rhetoric-as-docere tradition, which includes contemporary deliberative democracy, is predicated upon a suspicion of popular action that renders it insufficient as a model of political communication. Finally, I create a multi-level model of political communication that incorporates rhetoric-as-movere and the republican ethos of civic education as well as certain aspects of deliberative democratic theory and rhetoric-as-docere. Most importantly, I contribute a curriculum of rhetorical education that rehabilitates persuasion and teaches students about the three classical proofs of logos, pathos and ethos as well as modern empirical proofs. Both of the model of political communication and the educational curriculum are crucial for the necessary and proper recovery of rhetoric-as-movere and the improvement of political participation in the United States.

Advisors/Committee Members: Hoerl, Alexandra Elizabeth (author), Schochet, Gordon J. (chair), Bathory, Peter Dennis (internal member), Bronner, Stephen Eric (internal member), Takacs, Sarolta A. (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Communication in politics; Rhetoric – Political aspects

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hoerl, A. E. (2008). The necessity of inspiration and the crisis of modern political communication. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17492

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hoerl, Alexandra Elizabeth. “The necessity of inspiration and the crisis of modern political communication.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed August 11, 2020. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17492.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hoerl, Alexandra Elizabeth. “The necessity of inspiration and the crisis of modern political communication.” 2008. Web. 11 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Hoerl AE. The necessity of inspiration and the crisis of modern political communication. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2008. [cited 2020 Aug 11]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17492.

Council of Science Editors:

Hoerl AE. The necessity of inspiration and the crisis of modern political communication. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17492

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