Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Schloss, Rene S"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Rutgers University

1. Marrero-Berrios, Ileana, 1988-. Development of in vitro osteoarthritis models to study the effects of mesenchymal stromal cell treatments.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2020, Rutgers University

Osteoarthritis (OA), the principal source of physical disability and impaired quality of life in the US, is a chronic age-related disease characterized by the progressive destruction of articular cartilage, leading to total joint deterioration. OA severely burdens the US healthcare system with overall cost of ~185 billion dollars a year. Recent evidence suggests that inflammatory cytokine and chemokine release signals and cellular infiltration ultimately lead to matrix degradation and cartilage destruction. There is currently no cure for OA. Existing treatments alleviate symptoms initially; however, they are not able to alter disease progression and disease development eventually proceeds. Therefore, there is a need to develop effective therapies that could alter OA progression and promote healing in osteoarthritic joints. One approach to alter the progression of OA has been intra-articular administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) which secrete anti-inflammatory and regenerative factors that could alter the underlying pathophysiology of OA. However, these cells are not long-lasting when freely administered. We have previously demonstrated that alginate encapsulation of MSC lengthens their survival and promotes their secretory function, a characteristic that could serve as long term treatment for OA. In this dissertation, we investigated whether treatment with MSC or alginate-encapsulated MSC can provide sustained reduction of OA mediated joint inflammation and destruction, and promote healing in an in vitro model of OA. In addition, we aimed to improve on current OA in vitro models which often rely on chemically or mechanically stimulated chondrocytes, the sole cell component of articular cartilage, without taking into consideration other cell types and their interactions in the articular joint. We developed a multi-culture stackable insert system that allows for the 3D co-culture and investigation of multiple cell types, cell-cell interactions, and cell responses to their environment. Such experiments could provide powerful new tools and therapies in an otherwise irreversible progressive disease.

Advisors/Committee Members: Yarmush, Martin l (chair), Schloss, Rene S (internal member), Freeman, Joseph W (internal member), Hung, Clark T (outside member), School of Graduate Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: Osteoarthritis; Mesenchymal stem cells

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Marrero-Berrios, Ileana, 1. (2020). Development of in vitro osteoarthritis models to study the effects of mesenchymal stromal cell treatments. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/62546/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marrero-Berrios, Ileana, 1988-. “Development of in vitro osteoarthritis models to study the effects of mesenchymal stromal cell treatments.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed July 16, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/62546/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marrero-Berrios, Ileana, 1988-. “Development of in vitro osteoarthritis models to study the effects of mesenchymal stromal cell treatments.” 2020. Web. 16 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Marrero-Berrios, Ileana 1. Development of in vitro osteoarthritis models to study the effects of mesenchymal stromal cell treatments. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2020. [cited 2020 Jul 16]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/62546/.

Council of Science Editors:

Marrero-Berrios, Ileana 1. Development of in vitro osteoarthritis models to study the effects of mesenchymal stromal cell treatments. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2020. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/62546/


Rutgers University

2. Ghodbane, Mehdi, 1985-. Simultaneous analyte quantification in low volume samples using a microfluidic device.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2015, Rutgers University

Immunoassays are one of the most widely performed assays in clinical and research settings due to their sensitivity, specificity, and ability to measure wide ranges of analytes. Recently, immunoassay technology has greatly improved due to the development of multiplex platforms, capable of measuring multiple analytes in a single sample. However, immunoassays are costly, time-consuming, and require relatively large sample volumes that inhibit their use in specific applications. Performing immunoassays using microfluidic devices has been shown to significantly reduce assay time, cost, and sample and reagent consumption. However, previous immunoassay devices possess drawbacks that prevent their broad use, including: low sensitivity, limited dynamic range, inability to change the analyte specificity, specialized reagent requirements, inability to produce quantitative data, and low sample throughput. Therefore, the objective of this dissertation was to develop a microfluidic immunoassay device overcoming the aforementioned limitations. A proof-of-concept device was developed capable of performing 8 parallel immunoassays on commercially available antibody conjugated microbeads. This eliminates the need for specialized reagents while allowing any analyte, for which antibodies are available, to be measured. Furthermore, we developed the first experimentally validated computational fluid dynamic model of antibody antigen binding in microchannels. Design of experiments (DOE) and multi-objective optimization techniques were used in conjunction with the model to optimize an IL-6 immunoassay with a sensitivity of 358 fM using only 1.35 μL of sample volume. The device design was then scaled-up to allow 32 samples to be processed simultaneously. With the expanded device, we demonstrated high-sensitivity, a large dynamic range, and quantification of 6 cytokines (Il-1b, Il-6, IL-10, IL-13, MCP-1, and TNF-a). Finally, we measured in vitro experimental supernatants in parallel using the microdevice and a conventional benchtop assay. The microdevice provided comparable results while reducing sample volume from 50 to 4.2 μL. In summary, we demonstrated a low-volume, highly sensitive assay with a large dynamic range capable of processing large numbers of samples using commercially available reagents. Due to these advantages, the technology in this work has far-reaching in vitro, in vivo, and clinical applications.

Advisors/Committee Members: Yarmush, Martin l (chair), Schloss, Rene S (internal member), Maguire, Tim J (internal member), Zahn, Jeffrey D (internal member), Ramachandran, Rohit R (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Microfluidics; Immunoassay – Methods

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ghodbane, Mehdi, 1. (2015). Simultaneous analyte quantification in low volume samples using a microfluidic device. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/46345/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ghodbane, Mehdi, 1985-. “Simultaneous analyte quantification in low volume samples using a microfluidic device.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed July 16, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/46345/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ghodbane, Mehdi, 1985-. “Simultaneous analyte quantification in low volume samples using a microfluidic device.” 2015. Web. 16 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Ghodbane, Mehdi 1. Simultaneous analyte quantification in low volume samples using a microfluidic device. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. [cited 2020 Jul 16]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/46345/.

Council of Science Editors:

Ghodbane, Mehdi 1. Simultaneous analyte quantification in low volume samples using a microfluidic device. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/46345/

3. Naser, Mohammad, 1985-. Light scatter based label-free assessment of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2018, Rutgers University

Live-cell imaging has become increasingly important to the scientific community as researchers aim to understand the morphology and dynamics of the subcellular structures. Specifically, mitochondrial morphology under healthy and pathologic conditions is an emerging area of interest, with applications in neuroprotective drug discovery amongst many. Fluorescent dyes act as the current biological gold standard for visualizing organelles in live-cell imaging, yet they have been shown to cause adverse effects on subcellular functions, prompting the development of alternate, “label-free”, methods of imaging. By employing Optical Scatter Imaging (OSI), which is based on optical Fourier filtering where scattered light is filtered by the hardware using size and orientation sensitive Gabor filters, images can be acquired label-free and processed to extract morphometric data. As groundwork for developing a label-free method for probing mitochondria, we first demonstrated that optical scatter imaging with principal component analysis (PCA) can classify apoptosis-competent Bax/Bak-expressing, and apoptosis resistant Bax/Bak-null immortalized baby mouse kidney (iBMK) cells without the use of fluorescent labels. Furthermore, in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells (BAEC), a different cell type, we revealed that label-free Optical Scatter Imaging (OSI) can be combined with digital segmentation to create dynamic subcellular masks. These masks can be used to extract the “orientedness” of organelles, which corresponds to an organelle’s degree of orientation, allowing the quantification of organelle morphology during cell injury induced by calcium overload. In order to optimize this label free imaging and processing method for neuronal mitochondria, we applied a size-encoding parameter, “Smax”. All in all, we have developed different approaches to detect and quantify morphological changes associated with mitochondria and other organelles in three different cell-types and we have compared the results with a fluorescent data. This ultimately implies that our label-free imaging technique can be modified for use in many cell types, enabling numerous possible research applications in organelle visualization.

Advisors/Committee Members: Boustany, Nada N. (chair), Pierce, Mark C. (internal member), Schloss, Rene S. (internal member), Firestein, Bonnie L. (internal member), Petitjean, Mathieu (outside member), School of Graduate Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: Microscopy

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Naser, Mohammad, 1. (2018). Light scatter based label-free assessment of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/59176/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Naser, Mohammad, 1985-. “Light scatter based label-free assessment of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed July 16, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/59176/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Naser, Mohammad, 1985-. “Light scatter based label-free assessment of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.” 2018. Web. 16 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Naser, Mohammad 1. Light scatter based label-free assessment of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jul 16]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/59176/.

Council of Science Editors:

Naser, Mohammad 1. Light scatter based label-free assessment of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2018. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/59176/

.