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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Salyer, Greg"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Biggs, Justin, 1982-. Demanding difference.

Degree: MA, Liberal Studies, 2016, Rutgers University

This cultural critique employs the philosophical concept of potentiality to interrogate the relationship between economic and ontological processes of production - that is, how does our material infrastructure both arise from and shape our nature as socially-imbricated individuals? The reigning neoliberal ideology presents capitalist relations as the final formula for human happiness, suggesting that material surpluses guarantee the fulfillment of our needs and desires. But this elides the possibility of any “ontological surplus” accruing to human communities, the sense of increased degrees of freedom to reorganize social life. It is obvious that extreme material deprivation confines an individual or community’s efforts to the pursuit of necessities, but why, in an age of vast material excess, do we continue to put our time and talents primarily into work-related activities instead of self-work? I argue that the answer hinges on a narrow understanding of potentiality (dynamis). This key concept derives from Aristotle, as do those of economics (oikonomia) and the political life (bios politikos). Putting these ancient ideas in dialogue with events that exemplify our present and discourses that seek to define it, I am to develop a discourse that could effectively subvert the dominant “post-political” neoliberal paradigm and actualize creative resistance to our present conditions. To think this project through from theory to practice, I draw from a set continental philosophers beginning with Marx, Heidegger and Arendt, then progressing to Jacques Lacan, Slavoj Zizek and Catherine Malabou. Each of them has applied philosophy to social conditions, not to develop a “political philosophy” in the old prescriptive and normative sense, but a sort of template for improvisational praxis rooted in conceptual revaluation of current conditions. I attempt to apply this template to our own situation and expand it into a program of discursive action geared toward breaking the ideological deadlock enabling the constant reproduction of an ontologically limiting social order. Advisors/Committee Members: Salyer, Greg (chair).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Biggs, Justin, 1. (2016). Demanding difference. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/49750/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Biggs, Justin, 1982-. “Demanding difference.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed September 19, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/49750/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Biggs, Justin, 1982-. “Demanding difference.” 2016. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Biggs, Justin 1. Demanding difference. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2016. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/49750/.

Council of Science Editors:

Biggs, Justin 1. Demanding difference. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2016. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/49750/


Rutgers University

2. Jensen, Jenifer. Jung, the shadow, and The X-Files.

Degree: MA, The X-Files, 2019, Rutgers University

This paper explores Jung’s theory of the shadow, personal unconscious, and collective unconscious, using The X-Files as its narrative transport. When television show The X-Files premiered on September 10, 1993, it is doubtful anyone anticipated its impact on a generation of television viewers. From advancing the theory of alien intervention in human civilization, to creating “the Scully effect” (Lane), The X-Files is an American pop cultural mainstay. The paradoxical brilliance of the show is that it both influenced and interpreted popular American culture. Something vital about our time in history speaks through the stories it tells. It is not the only science fiction television show to create legions of fans, spawn movies, books, comics, and general obsession in American geekdom. But it is the only television show which began in 1993, ran for almost a decade, and then returned, fourteen years later with episodes seeking transcendent answers about what it means to be human, and the possibility of knowledge, truth, and power in the era of Trump, fake news and social media. Advisors/Committee Members: Salyer, Greg (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Liberal Studies; Jungian psychology; Television series

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jensen, J. (2019). Jung, the shadow, and The X-Files. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60545/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jensen, Jenifer. “Jung, the shadow, and The X-Files.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed September 19, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60545/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jensen, Jenifer. “Jung, the shadow, and The X-Files.” 2019. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Jensen J. Jung, the shadow, and The X-Files. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2019. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60545/.

Council of Science Editors:

Jensen J. Jung, the shadow, and The X-Files. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2019. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60545/


Rutgers University

3. Berry, Jane, 1963-. Healing the warrior’s soul: the use of ceremony and story in healing the invisible wounds of war.

Degree: MA, Liberal Studies, 2017, Rutgers University

The men and women who fight our society’s wars pay a high psychological cost. Levels of mental illness, homelessness, and domestic violence are high, and in 2014 veterans accounted for 18 percent of all deaths by suicide. Clearly this is a significant problem, not just for the veterans and their families, but for society as a whole. This paper examines whether, in caring for veterans, modern medicine can take any lessons from traditional Native American healing methods, in particular in the use of story and ceremony. It explores the concept of moral injury, the historical place of Native American healing, and its significant but often unacknowledged and overlooked contribution to modern medicine. It goes on to examine the way in which story and ceremony are linked, and at the power of story, and addresses the subject of healing the warrior, and the steps which are necessary in order to do this. Finally it touches on the role of story in the modern world, and on the importance of involving the entire community in healing the warrior’s soul Advisors/Committee Members: Charme, Stuart (chair), Salyer, Greg (internal member).

Subjects/Keywords: Veterans – Mental health

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Berry, Jane, 1. (2017). Healing the warrior’s soul: the use of ceremony and story in healing the invisible wounds of war. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/54979/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Berry, Jane, 1963-. “Healing the warrior’s soul: the use of ceremony and story in healing the invisible wounds of war.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed September 19, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/54979/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Berry, Jane, 1963-. “Healing the warrior’s soul: the use of ceremony and story in healing the invisible wounds of war.” 2017. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Berry, Jane 1. Healing the warrior’s soul: the use of ceremony and story in healing the invisible wounds of war. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2017. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/54979/.

Council of Science Editors:

Berry, Jane 1. Healing the warrior’s soul: the use of ceremony and story in healing the invisible wounds of war. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2017. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/54979/

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