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You searched for +publisher:"Rutgers University" +contributor:("Nealen, Andrew"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Mi, Xiaofeng, 1978-. Representation and depiction of 2D shapes using parts.

Degree: PhD, Computer Science, 2010, Rutgers University

We describe a 2D shape abstraction system that aims to clarify the structure without loss of the expressiveness of the original shape. To do this, traditional approaches in computer graphics typically use simplification techniques based on local adjustments of vertices, edges and faces. However, this thesis argues that an effective depiction can benefit from a computational representation compatible with a human’s understanding of the shape. To support this argument, we first present a system that parses a 2D planar shape into a part-based structure that approximately respects the structural organization in human perception. Then we show that simplifications of this representation align with the common artistic practices in shape abstraction, in which only prominent parts are preserved and the visual structures are more clarified than using traditional simplification methods based on local adaptation of geometric details. To compute the part structure of a given shape, we first propose that a part connects to the rest of the shape via its transition. Then we use a simple but general model to mathematically locate and describe this transition. We show that our model generalizes previously discovered theories on how the human visual system parses a shape into parts. It also provides a plausible way of explanatory shape analysis that requires clean pruning of parts without leaving attachment traces. Following insights from cognitive science, we have designed a set of heuristics to resolve ambiguities in the representation of the shape. A set of stroke-based tools is designed so that the user can interact with the system to guide the shape analysis as well as to evaluate and optimize the performance of the parser. Geometric thresholds and part selection tools are provided for the user to specify a subset of the part structure computed from the above step. The abstraction is done by simply reconstructing the shape from this subset. The reconstruction respects the geometric properties of the original part attachment and allows topological alternations of the structure resulting from elimination of less salient parts, which greatly improves the flexibility in the reconstruction. The perceptual study we have conducted confirms that human subjects indeed prefer our abstractions over the traditional 2D shape simplifications by Douglas-Peucker or Progressive Meshes, both of which try to approximate certain geometric properties during the simplifications.

Advisors/Committee Members: Mi, Xiaofeng, 1978- (author), DeCarlo, Doug (chair), Nealen, Andrew (internal member), Stone, Matthew (internal member), Finkelstein, Adam (outside member), Singh, Manish (outside member).

Subjects/Keywords: Computer graphics; Rendering (Computer graphics); Computer vision

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mi, Xiaofeng, 1. (2010). Representation and depiction of 2D shapes using parts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056580

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mi, Xiaofeng, 1978-. “Representation and depiction of 2D shapes using parts.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed September 22, 2019. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056580.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mi, Xiaofeng, 1978-. “Representation and depiction of 2D shapes using parts.” 2010. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Mi, Xiaofeng 1. Representation and depiction of 2D shapes using parts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2010. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056580.

Council of Science Editors:

Mi, Xiaofeng 1. Representation and depiction of 2D shapes using parts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056580

2. Gerstner, Timothy, 1987-. Pixelated abstraction.

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2013, Rutgers University

Pixel art remains a contemporary art form and a common rendering technique in digital games and media. However, the manual creation of pixel art is often time consuming and requires a degree of skill that is not easily obtained by novices of the art. Few, if any, methods exist to automatically generate pixel art. Naive downsampling techniques such as nearest neighbor and cubic downsampling do not adequately preserve features or maintain a vibrant palette. In this thesis we present our work on automatically and semi-automatically converting high resolution images into an output that approximates the manual results of pixel artists. This is a multi-step, iterative algorithm that simultaneously solves for a palette and a mapping of segments of the input image to pixels in the output. We provide a set of controls that give the user flexible influence on the output and the ability to work anywhere between a purely automated and purely manual process. We present the automated and semi-automated results of our algorithm and compare them to the results generated using naive downsampling techniques and the manual results produced by expert pixel artists. Through a formal user study and interviews with expert pixel artists, we demonstrate that our results offer an improvement over the naive methods. Advisors/Committee Members: Gerstner, Timothy, 1987- (author), Nealen, Andrew (chair), Metaxas, Dimitris (internal member), Stone, Matthew (internal member).

Subjects/Keywords: Computer drawing; Art, Modern – 21st century

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gerstner, Timothy, 1. (2013). Pixelated abstraction. (Masters Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068859

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gerstner, Timothy, 1987-. “Pixelated abstraction.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed September 22, 2019. http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068859.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gerstner, Timothy, 1987-. “Pixelated abstraction.” 2013. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Gerstner, Timothy 1. Pixelated abstraction. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rutgers University; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068859.

Council of Science Editors:

Gerstner, Timothy 1. Pixelated abstraction. [Masters Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068859


Rutgers University

3. Borosán, Péter, 1983-. Automatic meshing and rigging for the creation and deformation of 3D shapes.

Degree: Computer Science, 2014, Rutgers University

Subjects/Keywords: Shapes; Computer graphics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Borosán, Péter, 1. (2014). Automatic meshing and rigging for the creation and deformation of 3D shapes. (Thesis). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/42368/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Borosán, Péter, 1983-. “Automatic meshing and rigging for the creation and deformation of 3D shapes.” 2014. Thesis, Rutgers University. Accessed September 22, 2019. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/42368/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Borosán, Péter, 1983-. “Automatic meshing and rigging for the creation and deformation of 3D shapes.” 2014. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Borosán, Péter 1. Automatic meshing and rigging for the creation and deformation of 3D shapes. [Internet] [Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2014. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/42368/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Borosán, Péter 1. Automatic meshing and rigging for the creation and deformation of 3D shapes. [Thesis]. Rutgers University; 2014. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/42368/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.